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February 12, 1986 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-02-12

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The Michigan Daily -Wednesday, February 12, 1986 - Page 5

HEALTH

&

FITNESS

'U' hospital
hopes for
es
machin
the
permit
From staff and wire reports
The University hospitals have been
ordered by the state Department of
Public Health not to bill patients for
use of its new kidney stone machines
until the agency decides whether to
issue the hospital a permit.
The hospitals, along with Henry
Ford Hospital of Detroit, acquired the
1.7 million machines without ob-
taining certificates of need, which are
required for any capital expenditure
over $150,000.
Officials of both hospitals said Mon-
day they have not yet charged patien-
ts for using the machines, and thus
have not violated the law. Hospital of-
ficials expect a decision on the per-
mits by Friday.
'U' Hospital spokesman Dave
Friedo said yesterday, "We haven't
used the machine on patients - we've
been using it on research." The
machine isn't scheduled to be used on
patients until Saturday, he added, the
day after the new hospital opens.
Friedo said he expects the Hospital
to get the permit. If the permit is
rejected, he said, the hospital might
continue to use the machine in a
research capacity.
The kidney machines, called
Lithotripters, use shock waves to
disintegrate painful kidney stones
without surgery. Eight other
Michigan hospitals have applied to
the state to buy the machines, but the
state's health co-ordinating council
has recommended that only three be
permitted to operate here.
Last Friday's order to the two
hospitals is the first time the state has
issued compliance orders since the
certificate of need law has passed in
1978.

Influenza outbreak:

plagues University

M
1
Y
k

By ROSE PURRELLI
Winter's traditional outbreak of in-
fluenza has once again sent Univer-
sity students scurrying to Health Ser-
vices and campus drugstores.
Dr. Ceasar Briefer, director of
University Health Services, said the
new outbreak has led to five to ten
documented cases each day of in-
fluenza strain B. He added that the
outbreak started about three weeks
ago and is expected to continue until
some time in March.
"THIS IS somewhat more than
weve seen in the past three or four
years, but I'd call it an outbreak, not
an epidemic," Briefer said.
Teenagers and younger children are
most susceptible to the virus, he said,
because older people often have an-
tibodies that prevent them from cat-
ching the current virus.
According to Briefer, most cases
have been "pretty straightforward,"
and no complications or deaths have
been reported. He suggested that
common sense in health habits and a
humidifier in residence halls might
improve the situation, but cautioned
that "There is no way to prevent it
unless you've been immunized
against this specific virus."

Building directors in major campus
dorms had few statistics on the num-
ber of students who have contracted
the virus, but Caroline Gould, building
director at Bursley Hall, said, "In the
past two or three weeks we've been
running about twenty per wing."
MARIE HILTY, an LSA junior, is
one of those unfortunate students
stricken with the flu. Instead of going
to Health Services however, she has
treated herself with a home remedy of
rest and over-the-counter medicines.
"People don't go to Health Services
because of the bad reputation it has.
They prefer to suffer alone," she
said.
The influenza virus has not
significantly affected the rest of
Washtenaw County. Dr. John At-
water, health officer for Washtenaw
County, said that "clearly we don't
have an epidemic," though the
Washtenaw County Public Health
Department is "aware of illness in the
community."
The only confirmed outbreak of the
influenza virus was at Ann Arbor's
Green Hills School. Dr. Atwater said,
where roughly one-third of the student
body has called in sick at one time.

Daily Photo by PETE ROSS
The University's old hospital building stands silently as hospital staff and patients begin moving to their new
location this week. A special committee is currently evaluating possible functions for the old building.
'O Main maybedemolished

(Continued from Page D'
you're almost better off building a latest radiology equipment.
new building." Up until now, the 700,000 square foot
TRESTER and Ayers point to building has been "maintained on a
dilapidated conditions in the old patchwork system kept within," ac-
building that stand in the way of its cording to Keith Molin, director of
continued use. capital projects for the University.
"The hospital was built in the early The building's structural problems
1920's - it isn't air-conditioned, needs originally provided a major reason
new windows, and the plumbing and for building a new hospital.
electrical systems need repair. Under a stipulation in the new
Parking is also a huge problem," hospital contract, the old facility can-;
Ayers said. not be used for patient care. John
"Old Main isn't sufficient for Forsyth, executive director of the
medical technology today. For hospital, said this requirement leaves
example, the floors can't support the him open to the possibility of using

part of the facilities for research.
He admits, though, that some wings
"really ought to be ripped down."
Joe Diderick, director of the
Replacement hospital, maintains
that the most feasible idea generated
so far is partial demolition. He ex-
plained that each of the hospital's
wings can thrive independantly
because utilities are maintained
separately.
"Demolition of the whole building is
unlikely. The best ideas are to keep
portions," he said.

A

What's
Happening

Recreational Sports

4

AIDS antibodies found in saliva

SPRING BREAK HOURS:
February 22 - March 2, 1986

W

. Quad

BOSTON (AP) - Antibodies to the
Aids virus have been discovered in the
saliva of AIDS victims, and this may
explain why the disease isn't tran-
smitted through kissing and other
contact with saliva, researchers say.
The discovery also opens the
possibility of developing simpler
screening tests that would sample
saliva, rather than blood, for evidence
of exposure to the AIDS virus.
THE VIRUS itself has been found
occasionally in the saliva of some
AIDS patients. Yet there is no
evidence that the disease can be tran-
smitted except through sexual inter-

course or injection of tainted blood.
"Saliva seems to be very uninfec-
tious," said Dr. David Archibald of
the Harvard School of Public Health.
"There has to be some reason for
that."
One explanation may be that saliva
contains so little virus that it can't
cause the disease, Archibald said.
But the discovery of the antibodies in
saliva could also mean that these
natural germ fighters have deac-
tivated the microbes so they don't in-
fect others.
ARCHIBALD'S research, conduc-
ted on 93 people, appears in the March

students
'form
SCARF
(Continued from Page 1)
"The empty set was a favorite of a
lot of students. These are scary
results if you're in food service,"
said Tim Pletcher, SCARF co-
'chairman.
In addition, 92 percent of the studen-
ts expressed a desire to have more in-
put into what goes onto their plates in
the cafeteria.
A STUDENT worker in West Quad,
who refused to be identified, agreed
that the West Quad food crew is far
from efficient.
"My God, they cook food an hour
before they need it and store it in a hot
cart. I have problems with that," she
said.
"Everything's supposed to be
wrapped in cellophane when it goes
into the hot cart but sometimes it's
not. I ran French toast all afternoon
that wasn't wrapped. Chicken patties
are never wrapped."
THE STUDENT added that there
are two groups of student workers -
"there's one that cares and works
hard and is responsible. And there's
the other groups that only puts in
three or four hours a week."
"I think there's a sense of apathy."
SCARF will attempt to overcome
apathy and any other problems West
Quad food service may face by
distributing guides in students'
mailboxes on how to improve their
meals in the cafeteria. They also plan
a second survey which will ask
students to rate entrees on a scale
from one to ten.
SCARF members are displeased,
however, by the lack of response from
other West Quad students. The com-
mittee called a mass meeting before
the holidays and only two students
showed up.
"Students want to bitch, but they
will not do anything to help out," said
SCARF member Rachale
Steckleman.
Daily staff writer Dave Aretha
filed a report for this story.

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issue of the journal Blood.
Researchers disagree on how often
the saliva of AIDS victims contains
the virus.
The co-author of the latest study,
Dr. Jerome Groopman of New
England Deaconess Hospital, has
found the virus in the saliva of 44 per-
cent of victims of a pre-AIDS syn-
drome called AIDS-related complex,
or ARC.
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