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February 05, 1986 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-02-05

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 5, 1986 -Page 5

HEALTH &

FITNESS

Food
By KRISTIN POPE
Although health food lover
Ann Arbor's People's Food
organically grown produc
prices, co-op officials are
about wooden food bins that
deemed unsanitary by the
Department of Agriculture.
According to Sam Sarullc
director of the departme
division, cracks in the bins
the co-op's two Ann Arbo
sometimes attract grain bea
THESE insects, said ano
specialist in the departm
carry an organism tha
diseases in humans. He
however, that scientific ev
still sketchy.
The Department of Agric
repeatedly cited the co-
violating a 1968 state food
mandates storing food in a
manner. But Sarullo empha
the laws' vague nature pre
department from enforcing
"Until we can find an al
the stores in which bulk fo
from bins will only be
violating the law," Sarullo s

1 - -_

co-op to r4
AS AN alternative, the department
s flock to is currently drafting a new law that
Co-ops for will specify how bulk food can be
e at low safely and legally stored. Sarullo did
concerned not elaborate on the specifics of this
have been new legislation.
Michigan Meanwhile, the co-op is soliciting
funds from its members to replace the
o, deputy wooden bins at its Packard St. outlet
nt's food with more sanitary plastic containers.
at one of Although financial limitations have,
r outlets, thus far stood in the way, the co-op did
tles. change the bins last fall at its other
ther food store on N. Fourth Street.
ent, may "I am very favorably impressed. It
t causes looks more professional than I have
e added, come to expect a co-op to look,". said
idence is Tom Graven, a food specialist at the
Department of Agriculture.
ulture has GRAVEN complimented the co-op's
ops with efforts to improve its sanitation,
law that calling the installation of new bins "a
sanitary quantum change."
sizes that Randy Holtzman, general manager
vents the of People's Co-op, said workers in-
it. mediately clean the wooden bins and
ternative, destroy or feed to animals any con-
od is sold taminated food whenever the state
cited as issues a citation.
aid. "WE have no severe infestation

emove unsanitary wooden bins

problems," Holtzman said. "I
wouldn't thnk that the bugs would be
harmful. They occur in almost any
food."
HOLTZMAN emphasized that the

organically-grown, chemical-free
produce the co-op prides itself on may
be no healthier than traditional
supermarket items.
"THERE is no advantage to
organically grown food because the

'Until we can find an alternative, the stores in
which bulk food is sold from bins will be cited
as violating the law.'
- Sam Sarullo, Michigan
Department of Agriculture

sells, Heiber said.
"FOOD co-ops in general have
healthy food," Heiber said, but she
called low prices the greatest advan-
tage co-op shoppers can expect.
Co-op prices are generally less ex-
pensive than convenience and grocery
stores. Dannon Yogurt, for example,
costs ten cents less at the Packard Co-
op than at the Blue Front store down
the street.
Canned goods ran at a similar rate,
although vitamins and some produce
are more expensive due to the inac-
cessability of organically fertilized
fruits and vegetables.
SELLING items in bulk quantities
allows the co-op to offer lower prices.
It also provides specialty items such
as brown rice, lentils, pinto beans,
black eyed and split peas, and cooking
supplies.
The co-op runs on a membership
basis, with fees of $10 per household.
For individuals, the co-op offers
alternate four and eight month mem-
berships.
Membership entitles one to a 5 per-
cent discount on all items, a vote in
how the co-op is run, and the oppor-

tunity to volunteer time for an ad
ditional 10 percent discount.
ACCORDING to Kirsten Jensen, the
co-op's education services and mem-
ber services director, "The co-op's
basic purpose it to provide high-
quality whole foods and product lines
with integrity to co-op members and
the community."
Politics also plays a part in the co-
op.
"There is a focus on trying to be
aware of nutritional issues and the
political ramifications. The co-op at-
tracts people who are aware of the
same issues I like to think about,"
said Heidi Champmey, a
manager and co-op member. She did
not elaborate on her political perspec-
tive.
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co-op has not received any other
citations - except for the storage bins
- although the summer months
present a particular problem with
beatles.
Customers say they shop at the co-
op for its low prices and highly-
nutritional products, some of which
cannot be bought at other stores.
But Irene Hieber, a dietician at Un-
viersity Health Services, says the

body cannot tell the difference bet-
ween organically grown food and
chemically fertilized food," Hieber
said.
Hieber added that shoppers should
be wary of eliminating red meat -
which is unavailable at the co-op -
from their diets because the meat
contains eight essential amino acids.
These elements can be obtained in
equal quantity from the grains, beans
and dairy products that the co-op

Democrats respond

Reagan calls for new

to Reagan
(Continued from Page 1)
In a pointed reference to the con-
tinuing large trade imbalance with
Japan, the senator said: "The country
that rebuilt Germany and Japan after
World War II should not just surren-
der in the battle for foreign trade. It
will be a bitter irony if we lose the
trade war after winning the World
War."
BUT MITCHELL said the United
States, under Reagan administration
policies, is losing that war and is run-
ning up a trade deficit of nearly $150
billion in the process.
"IT IS, said Mitchell, "the biggest
trade deficit ever run up by any coun-
try in the entire history of the world."
"In every market, from cars to

's address
cameras, from Europe to South
America - even in our own country -
the competition is winning," he said.
Mitchell said the United States must
respond by increasing productivity
and competition in world markets and
by making sure at home that all
Americans - "even the most power-
ful among us - play by the same
economic rules."
Giving Democrats credit for first
proposing tax reform and saying the
Democratic-controlled House passed
a tax reform bill last year, Mitchell
said that over the past four years, 50
of the nation's largest corporations,
earning a total $57 billion in profits,
didn't pay one cent in federal income
tax."

Reagan
... sets future agenda

welfare sti
(Continued from Page 1)
back by horse-and-buggy programs
that waste tax dollars and squander
human potential. We cannot win that
race if we are swamped in a sea of red
ink."
Replying to repeated calls by some
in Congress to raise taxes to reduce
the federal deficit, Reagan said, "I'm
sorry, they're asking the wrong
people to tighten their belts. It's time
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we reduced the federal budget and left
the family budget alone."
Reporting the state of the union
"stronger than a year ago and
growing stronger each day," Reagan
reminded the Congress and a national
television audience. "It wasn't long
ago that we looked out on a different
land - locked. factory gates and long
gasoline lines. Intolerable prices and
interest rates turning the greatest
country on Earth into a land of broken
dreams."

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