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January 24, 1986 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-24

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 24, 1986 - Page 11

Sky-high Skiles takes on Blue

':

(Continued from Page 1)
said Michigan head coach Bill
Frieder, "you could take Scott Skiles,
and Rob Gibbs, who is a walk-on for
me, and you might have the best
backcourt in the nation. This guy is
phenomenal."
"HE'S capable of beating us."
Yes, he is capable of beating
Michigan; what the rest of the Spar-
tans do is incidental. Skiles is in the
franchise.
Aside from Skiles, the Spartans
consist simply of one good guard
(Darryl Johnson), a 6-8 center who
averages 2.3 points per game (Barry
Fordham), and two extraordinarily av-
erage forwards in Larry Polec and
Vernon Carr.
It doesn't take a genius, therefore,
to figure out that the Wolverines will
try to work the ball inside almost
every time down the court. MSU head
coach Heathcote sure knows it, which
is why he is considering juggling his
lineup.
"WE'RE talking about starting a
legitimate center instead of Fordham
or moving him to forward," said
Heathcote. "That means starting
Mario Izzo or David Mueller, although

Height is key for 'M'

neither is very active or ready to play
in the Big Ten at this time."
Realistically, no matter what lineup
changes State makes, Michigan will
dominate the rebounding and inside
scoring. The Spartans strategy will be
to counter Michigan's overbearing
size with quickness. Michigan does
have a weakness in defending the
transition game, and Skiles and crew
run it as well as anyone.
So how does Frieder plan to defend
that quickness? He's not quite sure.
"IF I HAD any guts, I'd start Hen-
derson, Wade and Tarpley and see
what they do," said Frieder. "Would
that force them to go to a bigger
lineup or would they just try to out-
quick us?"
Basically, Frieder has two options
in countering the Spartan speed.
Either hope the Wolverine beef can
outrebound MSU by enough to keep
the transition game from developing,
or add some speed of his own to try to
match up.
On that front, Frieder is contem-

plating starting either Glen Rice or
Garde Thompson in place of Butch
Wade.
IT'S unlikely that any lineup shif-
ting will take place, however. The in-
timidation factor alone in the front
court match should be enough to coun-
teract even the most torrid shooting
from Skiles.

micigan is a team that doesnt
have a weakness," said Heathcote.
"We have to play a near-perfect game
to upset a club that, talent-wise and
experience-wise, is better than our
club.
"They might not only be the best
rebounding club in the Big Ten, but in
the country as well."
Still, a little luck and a rousing Jen-
nison Field House crowd could go a
long way toward overcoming
Michigan's talent and experience.
Remember Minnesota.

THE LINEUPS
Michigan (17-1, 5-1) Mich. State (11-5, 24)
(6-6) Richard Rellford ..... (11.9) F (6-8) Larry Polec........(11.1)
(6-8) Butch Wade.........(5.3) F (6-6) Vernon Carr........(13.1)
(6-11) Roy Tarpley.........(14.7) C (6-8) Barry Fordham........(2.3)
(6-3) Gary Grant.........(13.3) G (6-2) Darryl Johnson.......(14.5)
(6-5) Antoine Joubert.....(11.9) G (6-1) Scott Skiles........(25.4)
SITE: Jenison Fieldhouse
TIME: 7:05 p.m.
RADIO: WUOM (91.7 FM), WAAM (1600 AM), WWJ (950 AM), WPAG
(1050 AM)
LAST MEETING: MICHIGAN 75, Michigan State 73 (February 23, East
Lansing)
SERIES LEADER: MICHIGAN 71-47

Alford,
Indiana
cut down
Purdue in
OT, 71-70

BLOOMINGTON (AP) - Steve
Alford scored 27 points last night, get-
ting 13 of Indiana's final 17 and
scoring the only field goal in over-
time, leading the Hoosiers to a 71-70
Big Ten Conference basketball vic-
tory over the 15th-ranked Purdue.
With all three Indiana front-line
starters out on fouls or injury, Alford
took over during the closing minutes
of regulation play.
The Boilermakers, who dropped out
of a first-place tie with idle Michigan
in the Big Ten race, took their biggest
lead at 69-64 with four minutes
remaining, but they didn't get another
field goal the rest of the game.

Alford, the conference scoring
leader, hit one free throw. Reserve
Steve Eyl got a rebound basket and
Alford hit two more foul shots to tie
the game 69-69 with 2:37 to go.
Iowa 76, Northwestern 43
CHICAGO (AP) - Jeff Moe scored
12 points, 10 during a 16-point run, as
Iowa beat Northwestern, 76-43, in Big
Ten basketball last night.
Iowa, 14-5 overall and 4-2 in the con-
ference, sped to a 7-0 lead behind two
baskets and a free throw from for-
ward Roy Marble.
Iowa substituted freely, as 13
Hawkeyes scored.

Illinois 67, Ohio St. 65
COLUMBUS (AP) - Ken Norman
and Bruce Douglas each hit two free
throws in the final 23 seconds as
Illinois held on for a 67-65 victory over
Ohio State in a Big Ten Conference
game last night.
Illinois, now 13-5 overall and 4-3 in
the conference, watched a 13-point
halftime advantage turn into a six-
point deficit late in the game but
scored six of the game's final eight
points to pull out the victory.
Ken Norman scored 27 points with
Anthony Welch adding 16 and Glynn
Blackwell 12 for the Illini.

Michigan center Roy Tarpley jams home two points against Minnesota.
Tarpley and the Wolverines are looking to top Scott Skiles and the Spar-
tans on Saturday.

'M' ENGINEERING STUDENT JUMPS TO NOVICE CHAMPIONSHIP:
Perky Powell parachutes for pride, win

SPRING BREAK

SKI

UTAH

By DAVE ARETHA
Scene: U.S. Collegiate Skydiving
Championships - Marana, Ariz. It's a
bright, chilly morning in late Decem-
ber and the Novice competition is at
its climax. A small crowd focuses in-
tently on a small airplane hovering
above.
Mark Powell, an. aerospace
engineer from Michigan, sits
anxiously in the cabin of the Cessna
206. He has already won one of the
three Novice events for style, but he
needs a victory in accuracy to claim
the Novice Overall Championship. A
pinpoint landing in the third round
would leave the others waiting in the
wings.
! ACROSS FROM Powell is James
Mayberry of Tennessee Tech.
Mayberry is breathing down Powell's
neck in the overall standings, and
staring down his face in the Cessna
206.
"My competition was right in my
face," said Powell. "Eyeball to
eyeball the whole ride to altitude.
Eyeball to eyeball as the doors
opened."

The pilot shouts "EXIT" and the
plane door opens. Powell leaps toward
a 10-meter radius pea-gravel pit a
half-mile below.
At 800 feet Powell checks the
always-shifting wind. At 500 feet, he
sets up his approach "just like you
were landing an airplane," and eyes
his target. With a final check of the
wind, he slams on his steering toggles
and rides hard into the pea-gravel.
BULLSEYE. Powell nearly lands
on a dime. Just a foot and a half from

the center of the target. No one would
do better. Mark Powell is a U.S.
Collegiate Skydiving Champion.
"I was ecstatic when I got up," he
said, grinning. "I knew that I had
taken it, and I was very happy!"
The next day Powell took a victory
dive. It was his first purely fun jump
in nearly two years - all the others
being disciplined practice dives
geared for the Championships.
"I JUST went out of the airplane
and celebrated," he said. "Went nuts

t3V~lgw oION2zJe\ WOOc'
1todl ~\ * . P
ci A 0
150 x'exc Wv
\n \ jvWo
oviss 15 oN 2

for 65 seconds."
A day later came the awards
ceremonies. Powell was honored
along with three Air Force cadets.
"They took the picture of the four
individual champions," said Powell.
"Three guys in uniform and me. I
liked that."
Now Powell is back at Michigan. He
still lives in the Baits single, but the
walls are no longer barren. Medals for
style and accuracy hang on the wall
next to his bed. In between is a plaque
signifying the Overall Championship.
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ext. 7368 free phone call
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Powell
... novice champ
"MY THOUGHTS were about how
bad I wanted to win," Powell recalled.
"Just not messing up. My thoughts
were about how fun skydiving was.
How challenging it was.
"There's an awful lot of things that
go though your head. You could write
a book about 'em."
Indeed. Powell could write about
the 37-hour car ride that took him
from his barren-walled single in Baits
to an old air force barracks "out in the
boonies," or how he spent Christmas
with strangers in the Arizona desert
just so he could have a few extra days
for practice jumps.
HE COULD also write about his low
money supply, since he was one of the
few competitors in the event who
wasn't supported by his school.
"The others didn't have to hitch
rides cross-country and live off Grape
Nuts and crackers that they stole out
of the Bursley cafeteria," Powell
said. "The University didn't even
know I was there."
Powell's book could describe the
"extremely intense feeling of jum-

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