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January 23, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-23

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, January 23, 1986 - Page 3

'U' community backs
research guidelines

By ROB EARLE
The United States Government may
have declassified research proposals
from University professors in order to
get around guidelines that limit
classified research here, according to
a former top research official.
Alfred Sussman, interim University
yice President for Research until last
September, said that government
agencies have dropped the classified
status of proposals when approached
by University officials with the terms
of the current research guidelines.
THE CURRENT guidelines, which
prohibit research that may threaten
human life or that cannot be openly
published, are under review by a
committee of students, faculty mem-
bers, and administrators appointed
by University President Harold
Shapiro.
Speaking last night at the commit-
tee's second open meeting, Sussman
said University officials have forced
he government "on most occasions"
todeclassify projects that would have
'violated the guidelines.
He could not, however, provide
specific examples of this practice,
when questioned by members of the
guideline-review committee.
OVERALL, Sussman warned the
committee of the dangers changing
the guidelines. Opponents of the
review have said weakening the rules
would flood the University with
Classified and military research
projects.
"I believe we ought to very
seriously consider the risks involved
in changing the guidelines," Sussman-
said.

He said the current guidelines have
worked well, particularly for the
Research Policies Committee, a panel
responsible for determining if
proposals conform to the guidelines
before they are sent to executive of-
ficers.
Other speakers at the meeting last
night also expressed their support for
maintaining the guidelines as they
stand.
Art History Prof. Joel Isaacson
stressed the importance of balancing
the freedom of inquiry of researchers
with the protection of the community
from harm.
"Individual interest must be sub-
jugated to the common goal," he said.
In this light, Isaacson siad, "the
review is appropriate and
necessary."
Isaacson suggested going one step
further - applying the guidelines to
non-classified research as well. The
Board of Regents rejected such a
proposal in 1983, even though it had
the support of many students and
faculty members.
An opposing view was presented by
Prof. Chihiro Kikuchi, of the nuclear
engineering department, who said
some relaxing of the guidelines should
take place when the results of the
research could benefit the com-
munity.
Kikuchi conducts "nuclear peace
preparedness research," and needs to
use classified materials in his work.
He said the guidelines should be
changed to exclude the requirement
to publich openly and that reviewers
should be careful about excluding
projects where there is a very low risk
of harm to human life.

Daily Photo by DEAN RANDAZZO
Bernard Malamud, author of The Natural, reads from one of his works yesterday as guest speaker at the Hop-
wood Writing Awards.
Students receivew ritingawards

-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Author Steven J. Bennett will speak on "How to Prosper with Non-
Technical Skills in a High-Tech World" at 4:10 p.m. in Aud. 4 MLB.
Films
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Singing Birds, 7 p.m.; Ecstacy, 8 p.m.; Lady
Chatterley's Lover, 9:40 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Michigan Theater Foundation - 42nd Street, 8 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Performances
Music at Midday - Raffi Kasparin, piano, 12:15 p.m., Pendleton Room,
Union.
Ann Arbor Civic Theater - Lone Star & Laundry & Boubon, 8 p.m., Ann
Arbor Civic Theatre.
Bird of Paradise Jazz Club - Steve Edwards Trio, 5:30 p.m.; Ron
a Brooks Trio, 9:30 p.m., 207 S. Ashley.
School of Music - Recitals, clarinet, Allen Rosenfeld, 8 p.m., Recital
Hall; cello, Kurt Harrison, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Speakers
Japanese Studies - Bernard A. Galler, "The U.S.-Japan Seminar on
Artificial Intelligence, June 1985," noon, Commons Room, Lane Hall.
Muslem Students Assoc. - Islamic coffee hour, "Islam and the West
Making of an Image, Lecture 2," noon, Third floor, League.
Anthropology - Jody Brown, "A Bronze Age Site in the Umbrian
Region of Italy," noon, room 2009, Museum Bldg.
Seminar Series in Cell and Developmental Genetics - James Varan;
"Production of Laminin by Tumor Cells: Biological Implications," noon,
room 1139, Nat. Sci. Bldg.
Germanic Languages and Literatures - Timothy Bahti, "Theories of
Knowledge: Fate and Forgetting in the Early Works of Walter Ben-
jamin," 4:10 p.m., West Conf. room, Rackham.
Delta Sigma Pi - Bob Mylod, "Current and Future Trends in
Banking," 4:15 p.m., Hale Auditorium.
Chemistry - Donald M. Burland, "Holographic Methods for In-
vestigating Solid State Photochemistry," 4 p.m., room 1200, Chemistry
Bldg.
Natural Resources - Frank Voytos and Jim Jordan, "Management
Plan for Michigan's Ottawa National Forest," 3 p.m., room 1046, Dana.
Ophthy./Psych;/Physiol./Bioengineering - Vision lunch seminar,
Hugh Wilson, "Masking and Spatial Patern Discrimination at
Supratheshold Contrasts," 12:15 p.m., room 2032, Neurosci. Bldg.
Med. Chem.-Steven Krawczyk, "Oncogene Expression in the
Development of Neoplasms," 4 p.m., room 3554, C. C. Little.
Linguistics - Donna Jo Napoli, "Mysteries of Prediction," noon, 3050
Frieze.
English - Lem Johnson, "Syllogism-Daggers and the Unretrunable
Heaven of Political Fictions," 8 p.m., W. Conf. room, Rackham.
* Meetings

By JOSEPH PIGOT
Ten University students pocketed
more than $2,450 in prize money
yesterday for their poetry, fiction,
and essays entered in this year's
Hopwood Underclassmen Awards.
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ber-
nard Malamud opened the awards
ceremony in Rackham Auditorium by
reading from his works, The Natural,
The Fixer, and Dubin's Lives, before
an audience of about 250.
Malamud, whose works have been
described as deeper and more
profound thansany other writer about
the condition of Jews, also read three
chapters from his untitled forth-
coming book.
Responding to a question from the
audience, Malamud said he liked
Robert Redford's screen adaptation
of his novel, The Natural.
"Redford's picture was more of a
moral tale," he said. "I went to see it
a couple of times myself. However, I
did not confuse his work with my
work."
The Hopwood Underclassmen
Awards were started in 1931 by
Broadway playwright and University
* alumnus Avery Hopwood, in order to
encourage students to write. Upon his
death, Hopwood left the awards
committee a $300;004 legacy to be
used as prize money.
This year, 77 contestants entered 93
manuscripts in the poetry, fiction, and
essay categories. Ten received awar-
ds.
Another ten writing awards totaling
$4,350 were distributed during yester-
day's ceremony.

Hopwood award recipients were:
Susanna Remold, RC freshman
(essay), Daniel Y. Kim, RC
sophomore (essay), Jeffrey Peters,
RC freshman (fiction), J. Daniel
Ligon, LSA sophomore (fiction), Lisa
Arsuaga, RC sophomore (fiction),
Beth Serlin, RC freshman (fiction),
Mary Lynch, RC sophomore (poetry),
J.L. Utley, LSA sophomore (poetry),
Dena Mermelstein, LSA sophomore
(poetry), Phillip Barnhart, RC
sophomore (poetry).

COMMUNITY NEWSCENTERS

1301 S. University
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
- 662-6150
C - -o
- E N
F E
- U
Auho

Winners of other contests. sponsored
by the English Department were:
Ingrid Tomey, Academy of American
Poets Prize, Gordon Kato, Bain-
Swiggett poetry prize, Marc J.
Sheehan, Michael R. Gutterman
Award in Poetry, Diane Raptosh,
Michael R. Gutterman Award in
Poetry, Paula Kay Gover and Roy W.
Cowden Memorial Fellowships went
to Gilda M. Povolo, Jacquelline
Casenas, Kathleen Halme, Diane
Raptosh and Don Solosan.

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COME JOI1N OUR STAFF
The University of Michigan Housing Division
RESIDENCE HALL POSITIONS 1986-87
The Housing Division is looking for well-qualified candidates to serve as resident staff
members in Residence Halls. We specifically are looking for students interested in:
-Serving as positive academic and group living role models
-Fostering a spirit of community
-Developing and strengthening leadership, communication and group skills and
-Developing programs for a diverse student population.
THERE WILL BE TWO INFORMATION MEETINGS:
Sunday, January 26, 1986 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
Tuesday, January 28, 1986 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
IN AUDITORIUM 3 - MODERN LANGUAGE BUILDING
Representatives from the Housing Division will be there to provide information and
answer questions regarding candidate qualifications, selection processes and job
expectations. Applications are available only at these meetings.
ALL NEW APPLICANTS ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND
ONE OF THESE MEETINGS
An Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer
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Michigan Productions - Mass meeting, 5:30 p.m., room 429, Mason
Hall.
University Age Concerns Council - Lunch meeting, noon, League.
Archery Club -7 p.m., Coliseum.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship -7 p.m., Kuenzel Room, Union.
University Alcoholics Anonymous - noon, room 3200, Union.
Miscellaneous
Law School - Debate, Yale Kamisar and Joseph Granco, "Was Miran-
da a Mistake?" 4 p.m., Law School.
Community News Center - Science Fiction author autographs, 5 p.m.,
1301 S. University.
Nectarine Ballroom - Dollar Night with D. J. Dorian Deaver and D. J.
The Wizard, 510 E. Liberty.
University Club - Soundstage.
Computing Center - Computing Course, "Learning to Use the MTS
File Editor," 7p.m., room 1013, NUBS.
Microcomputer Education - Workshops, Excel (Pt. II), 8:30 a.m.;
RX - -..4 !1.. «4 l . .« ' ff . ....- 411,kef.«.....rk ...«.. T« «.

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