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January 22, 1986 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-22

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ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Wednesday, January 22, 1986

Page 5

Kelsey digs up blasts from past

Pianist sparkles

By Lisa Jaffe
O N SATURDAY, January 25, the
exhibition Twenty-five Years of
Discovery at Sardis will open at the
Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. The
exhibition will include drawings,
watercolors, photographs and text
panels which present a summary of
the significant archaic finds made by
the joint Harvard-Cornell ar-
chaeological expedition near Sart, a
village in what is now southwestern
Turkey. The expedition staff, which
includes not only archaeologists but
also art historians, architects,
*biologists and other scientists, began
an intensive investigation of the
region of Sardis in 1958.
Although twenty-five years of ex-
cavations covered but a small percen-
tage of the total area of the ancient
city, the study has disclosed an exten-
Records
' Anne Hills - Don't Explain
(Hogeye)
Hills has spent the last several
years working with the likes of Tom
Paxton and Bob Gibson (she even
played the Ark three years ago with
the two of them) and has established
herself as one of the folk world's
premier back-up vocalists.
Moving into the foreground with
this release, she has mixed success,
but winds up with one or two trium-
phs.
The John Ims' penned "Two of a

sive range of knowledge about the
development of the urban site from
the prehistoric through the Turkish
periods.
Sardis was one of the cultural cen-
ters of the world in the middle of the
sixth century in terms of architecture,
sculpture, ivory carving, and jewelry.
It was in the years between 600 and
550 B.C. that the greatest
achievements in the artistic sphere
were made, and under Croesus him-
self, they reached a peak. This peak of'
extraordinary creativity, wealth, and
influence was followed by a gradual
descent lasting some three centuries.
Rising from a low point in Hellenistic
times, Sardis in its last major phase
emerged as a prosperous Graeco-
Roman and Late Antique City.
The major results of the expedition
relate to the Lydian and the Roman
Imperial-Late Antique-Early Byzan-

tine periods. The Lydian gold
refineries, city walls, a Roman bath
gymnasium complex and an ancient
synagogue are some of the sites
unearthed by the expedition. The
discovery that is unique to Sardis is
the Jewish synagogue, a structure
adapted from a Roman basilica,
which was previously part of the
gymnasium. Over 200 feet in length,
this is the largest ancient synagogue
ever to have been found. The rich
decoration consisted of elaborate
floor mosaics and geometric wall
designs. This building has been
restored, and its forecourt columns
re-erected around a huge stong vase
which has served as a fountain.
The novelty and importance of the
results of the Harvard-Cornell ex-
pedition go far beyond individual
buildings, complexes or indeed the
city of Sardis. The excavation of the
bath gymnasium, Synagogue, Byzan-

tine Shops, and House of Bronzes,
brings into focus an amazing inter-
play of civic, athletic, cultural, com-
mercial, artistic, political, and
religious forces involving the interac-
tion of Greeks, Romans, Jews and
Christians in a city formed in the
Christian world as one of the Seven
Churches of Asia.
In addition to the exhibit, Professor
Fikret Yegul will give a lecture en-
titled "The Bath-Gymnasium Com-
plex at Sardis: 25 Years of Ex-
cavation and Restoration" Friday,
January 24 in Angell Hall, Auditorium
D, 8:00 p.m.
The Kelsey Museum of Archaeology
will run the exhibition Twenty-five
Years of Discovery at Sardis through
Monday, April 14. The museum is
open to the public Monday through
Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and
Saturday and Sunday, from 1:00 to
4:00 p.m.

Pianist Jutta Czapski, wife of
Detroit Symphony music director
and conductor Gunther Herbig,
recently made a most auspicious
debut with the Detroit Symphony
orchestra at last week's subscrip-
tion concerts.
The delightful East German
played a sparkling performance of
Shostakovich's Second Piano Con-
certo, and although the piece is not
in the front seat of piano concert.
repetoire, Ms. Herbig gave it a
breathtakingly fresh inter-
pretation. Her first movement
began ever so simply, merely
stating the stark single-noted
theme in both hands, but as the
music moved onward, suddenly
Czapski became enveloped in a
brilliant march which pranced
along like toy soldiers.
The second movement's writing
is in cantilena style, almost
reminiscent of some of Polish
composer Frederic Chopin's
writing. Here, Czapski produced a
velvety and round tone quality
which sang each note like a single
pearl on a necklace strand, each
one delicate and polished.
With such a robust and driving
finale as the Shostakovich Second
Piano Concerto has, and with the
motivating and inspired perfor-
mance Czapski gave it, it certainly

deserves a bigger part in general
programming and performance.
Guest conductor Kazimierz
Kord's performance of the
Rachmaninoff Symphony No. 2 af-
ter intermission was also the same
way: Solid, structurally sound, and
with admirable playing on all of
the orchesta members' parts.
Rachmaninoff's many luscious
melodies and harmonies which fill
up the score of the Second Sym-
phony were all highlighted
gloriously making the after-inter-
mission just as delightful as the
first half.
Also, his opening orchestral tone
poem: Mussorgsky's A Night on
Bald Mountain was brilliant,
decisive and moving. The or-
chestra played with vivaciousness
and an appropriate sense of
demonic drive.
-Neil Galanter
7 Barber Stylists
Professional' eExperienced
NO WAITING I
DASCOLA STYLISTS
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Liberty off State ......... 668-932g

Kind" is one of the year's finest folk
singles. With a catchy tune perfectly
suited for Hills' voice and lyrics that
paint a fresh picture of highway
loneliness, it has the earmarks of a
classic'
Similarly her rendition of Paxton's
"Johnson" staves off the biggest
danger that Paxton faces; his own
stagnation. Hills' treatment is strong
and moving, and is generally more
powerful than Paxton's own.
She has somewhat less success
moving into jazz-like vocals with
"Last Day of Pompeii" (written by
Mike Smith of "The Dutchman"

fame). Here she proves her voice is
beautiful and flexible, but something
is still missing.
The backup playing is strong, par-
ticularly Stuart Rosenberg's man-
dolin. Rosenberg, as co-producer,
seems the perfect foil for Hills, which
makes the rumors that they've had a
falling out all the more disappointing.
In addition to the generally strong
performances, the album is notewor-
thy for the forum it gives many of the
Chicago area's best young
songwriting talent. In addition to
Smith (who never seems to get
anything of his recorded other than
"The Dutchman") and Ims, Tim

Henderson and Andrew Calhoun
provide a total of three tunes.
Calhoun, who recently opened at the
Ark for Jesse Colin Young, said he
hoped to swing back through town in
the coming semester. Hills' singing
colors his songs in a way he cannot,
yet she loses some of the personality
essential to his work.
In all, Don't Explain is a strong and
unexpected album. If she can con-
tinue to tap into the wealth of young
folk talent that hasn't gotten ex-
posure, Hills should remain a top folk
singer for years to come.
--Joseph Kraus

0;:

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BUT he loves
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Become a Daily photographer -
Get into concerts for free,
Go backstage and meet the stars,
Stand on the sidelines at U of M
football games,
Impress members of the opposite sex (or
the same sex, if you prefer).
- J
Portfolio review: Sunday, January 26, 1986
Bring anything photographic. New time: 1:00 P.M. at
Student Publications Building, 420 Maynard.
Call Dan or Andi at 764-0552, for more information.

* *
*
I'HOP WOOD*
UNDERCLASSMEN .
IA WARD SI
* *
* * Academy of American Poets Prize*
* * Bain-Swiggett Prize
* Michael R. Gutterman Award
* * Roy W. Cowden Memorial Fellowship *
WITH .
Fiction Reading By:
BERNARD MALAMUD
AUTHOR OF:
The Natural
The Fixer
God's Grace
The Stories of Bernard Malamud
Pictures of Fidelman
* OPEN TO THE PUBLIC *
- WEDNESDAY, JAN.22 *
4:00 P.M.
Rackham Auditorium
**

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