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December 11, 1985 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-12-11

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, December 11, 1985 - Page 3
Three scholars to be honored

(Continued from tage 1)
Kung, one of the most controversial
figures in the Roman Catholic church,
supports the ordination of women as
priests and advocates the right of
priests to choose whether or not to
remain celibate, said Astrid Beck, a
program associate in the University's
Studies in Religion Program.
"HE HAS spoken out on issues that
others have not dared to touch," Beck
said.
Kung will make a preview ap-
pearance 4:00 p.m. Saturday in Hill
Auditorium with a lecture entitled,
"Is there one true religion or are there
many?" The lecture is free and open
to the public.
Although his liberal views have kept
him from advancing in the Catholic
Church, Kung is a pioneer "because
he's staying within the Church," Beck
said.
"THE University, by honoring
someone like this, is making a
statement (and) valuing the prin-
ciples for which he stands," she ad-
ded.
Dando, who is internationally
famous for his contributions to
criminal procedure in Japan, began
his career when torture was still a
legal means of criminal punishment
in that country.

"(Dando) entered an area which
was of vital importance to those who
were trying to put together a liberal
state" where individuals had rights,
said law Prof. Francis Allen.
"He is probably without any doubt
the most distinguished Japanese legal
scholar," Allen said. "many of his
students occupy important positions
in ... government agencies and cor-
porations."
Each term honorary degree
recipients are nominated by an Honorary
Degree Committee, which is com-

posed mainly of faculty members.
The names then go to the board of
regents for approval and, if approved,;
are put into a pool, said James Shortt
assistant to President Shapiro. Up to
five honorary degrees can be awarded
each term, and those names are
chosen randomly from the pool.
Nelson Mandela, a jailed South,
African civil rights leader, was recen-
tly nominated for an honorary degree.
The Honorary Degree Committee will
consider it during its next meeting
this spring.

Daily Photo by JAE KIM
River run
Michelle Overway, an engineering freshman, jogs through the drizzle yesterday under Huron River Drive in
Gallup Park.

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Iowa murder brings fears offarm violence

v v . -.

HILLS, Iowa - A rampage by al
frustrated farmer who killed three
-4eople and then committed suicide
could lead to more bloodshed by far-
mers facing debts and foreclosure, a
counselor said yesterday.
"I think a lot of farmers harbor
those same feelings" of frustration
and helplessness under the stress of
heavy debts, said Dan Levitas of
Prairiefire, a Des Moines-based far-
mer advocate group.
- DALE BURR, a farmer for some 40
ears, was $800,000 in debt Monday
when he killed a bank executive, his
wife, another farmer and himself.
Burr killed John Hughes with a
shotgun blast at the Hills Bank and
Trust Co. after the bank refused to
cash a check on his overdrawn ac-
count, authorities said.
"Our fear is this will provide a
stimulation to push people in the
direction of acting on their feelings,"

Levitas said, calling on Washington
for help. "I have personally dealt
with farmers on the phone who had a
loaded shotgun and were ready to get
into the pickup and go down to the
bank."
"Tensions are high in the coun-
tryside," Levitas said, from farmers
who have thought not only of taking
their own lives, but of acting on their
aggression and taking the lives of
others as a result."
LOW CROP prices, relatively high
interest rates, high costs and low land
values have combined to force people
off farms that, in many instances, had
been in their families for generations.
Land has been lost in forced sales and
equipment and livestock have been
seized. Mental health experts say
bankers, because of their role in
making yearly loans to buy seed and
long-term mortgages to buy land, of-
ten become the target when things go

wrong.
"No incident can more tragically
reflect the brewing violence in the
Farm Belt than the senseless killing
of John Highes," said Rep. Jim
Leach, (R-Iowa), a friend of Hughes.
"The irony is that there was no
more thoughtful, compassionate
banker in lows."
BURR LEFT the bank shortly after
he was told he could not cash a check,
went to his pickup truck and returned
a few minutes later with a .12-guage
shotgun concealed under a heavy
coat.
After killing Hughes, he drove to a
Johnson County farm where he shot
and killed Richard Goody, with whom
he had argued about farmland. He
committed suicide in his truck after a
deputy had stopped him and
authorities later discovered the body
of Burr's wife, Emily at the couple's
home.
"It's almost a combat mentality,"

said Pete Zevenbergen, director of the
'Community Mental Health Center of
Linn County in Cedar Rapids. "When
you're besieged, yu're really feeling
you don't have alternatives and
become irrational. The guy you're
shooting isn't necessarily the
enemy."
In the minds of some troubled far-
mers, bankers are the enemy. Four
percent of agricultural lenders in a
recent Iowa survey said they or an
employee had been physically
assaulted by a customer.
"I have a friend who was with a
PCA (Production Credit Association)
who told me he kept a loaded revolver
in his desk," said H. Rand Petersen,
president of the Shelby State Bank in
Harlan. "If it comes to that, I'm get-
ting out of the business. It's no fun
any more."
Levitas said he was not surprised by
the shootings. "We had been an-
ticipating and warning of this for
some time," he said.

A-

What's
Happening

HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Join the Men's Glee Club on the Diag at 4 p.m. for Christmas caroling.

Senate resolves to
crackdown on felons

Recreational Sports
16th ANNUAL SKI SWAP
Saturday, December 14, 1985
9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
SPORTS COLISEUM
Fifth Ave. & Hill St.
BARGAIN HUNTERS WELCOME!

Films
Cinema Guild - Un Mauvais Fils, 7 p.m., La Rupture, 9:05 p.m., MLB
3.

Mediatrics - Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence, 7 & 9:15 p.m.; Paper
Chase, 9:30 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Performances
Ark - Open mike night, hootenany, 8 p.m., 637S. Main.
Bird of Paradise - Ron Brooks Trio.
Michigan Union Cultural Programs - Early Music Ensemble, Edward
Parmenter, director, 8 p.m., Pendleton room, Union.
School of Music - University Choir/Philharmonia, 8 p.m., Hill Aud.;
Early Music Ensemble, 8 p.m., Pendleton room, Union; recital, trumpet,
Daniel D'Addio, 8p.m., Rectial Hall.
Speakers
American Statistical Assoc. - Roger Wright, "Hetereoscedastic
Models, Finite Population Sampling and Electric Utility Load Resear-
ch," 8 p.m., Room 146, Grad. Business Bldg.
Chemistry - Ketan Trived, "X-Ray Fluorescence, A Technique for
Non-Destructive Elemental Analysis," 4 p.m., room 1200, Chemistry
Bldg.; Kenneth Fish, "Xanthine Oxidase: Recent Studies on Mechanism
of Catalysis," 4p.m., room 1300, Chemistry Bldg.
Classical Studies - Arthur Pomeroy, "Death Notices in the Classical
Historians," 4:10 p.m., room 2009, Angell Hall.
Commission for Women - Brown bag lecture, Colleen Dolan-Greene
and Grace Willis, "Child care, Part-time Work and Personnel Policies Af-
fecting Work and the Family," noon, room D1202, Med. Prof. Bldg.
Electrical and Computer Science - Thomas Knoll, "Recognizing Par-
tially Visible Objects Using Feature Indexed Hypotheses." 5 p.m., room
2076, E, Engineering.
Engineering - Norman I. Badler, "Positioning and Animating Human
Figures in a Task-Oriented Environment," 4 p.m., room 241, 10E Bldg.
Physiology - Glenn I. Hatton, "Reversible Neuronal- Glial Plasticity
in the Adult Mammalian Brain," 4 p.m., room 7745, Med. Sci. II.
Meetings
Dissertation Support Group - 1:30 p.m., room 3100, Union.
Ensian Yearbook - 7 p.m., Student Publications Bldg.
Michigan Gay Union - 9 p.m., 802 Monroe.
Science Fiction Club - Stilyagi Air Corps, 8:15 p.m., League.
Student Counseling Services - Adult children of alcoholic parents,
10:30 a.m.
Miscellaneous
Guild House Campus Ministry - Beans and rice dinner, 6 p.m., 802
Monroe.
Hillel - Hanukkah party, 7:30 psm.,1429 Hill St.
Microcomputer Education - PageMaker demo, Gavin Eadie, Ap-
plication Program for Macintosh, 2:30 p.m., room 4003, SEB; workshops:

LANSING (UPI) - Resolutions
declaring a "condition of emergency"
exists in Detroit because thousands of
accused felons are on the loose
cleared the Senate and were sent to
the House yesterday.
The chamber also approved a
resolution giving its special Safe
Streets Committee subpoena powers
and sent the House a bill apparently
making it easier for police to obtain a
search warrant.
The two Detroit resolutions
authorize the Department of State
Police to use troopers normally
assigned to road patrols in the area to
help serve the estimated 9,287 out-
standing felony warrants in the city.
Some individual criminals may face
more than one warrant.
Effective for 180 days, the main
resolution also asks the U.S. Marshals
Service to reinstitute its so-called
Operation FIST program to catch
fugitives.
Sen. John Kelly, the Detroit

Democrat sponsoring the resolutions,
said there are up to 2,000 repeat offen-
ders among the people facing warran-
ts.
"Those people know they can roam
the streets with impunity," Kelly
said.
He called crime Detroit's top
problem in attracting business.
Responding to criticism, Kelly said
the resolutions do have legal standing
and are substantive. Critics, however,
said they will have little impact.
Sen. Lana Pollack (D-Ann Arbor)
said the resolutions are "comprised
entirely of rhetoric."
Meanwhile, Democratic Sen. Jackie
Vaughn of Detroit said the measures
are not wanted by local officials. "We
do not need any more occupation
troops in Detroit," Vaughn said,
unless aid is requested by the city.
Fellow Detroit Democratic Sen.
David Holmes said state police repor-
ts show suburbs are actually more
crime-ridden.

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'U' forms AIDS task force

(Continued from Page 1)
Dolan-Greene plans to make
recommendations by primarily
talking to members of the different
academic departments of the Univer-
sity. "To my knowledge there have
been no cases of AIDS within the
faculty or personnel of the Univer-
sity," she added.
Heidke sees potential for a student
with AIDS to be discriminated against
in the residence halls. "considering
the epidemilogy of the disease,
however, I am unaware of any reason
why a student would be removed from
the dormitory in such an instance," he
added.
Task forces similar to the Univer-
sity's have been set up at Columbia
University and New York University.
Between the two schools one
professor, three staff members and
two students have already died as a
result of AIDS.
lint.
PAA TREE
RESTAURANT

The National Education Association
has encouraged universities to adopt
guidelines for admitting students with
AIDS on a case-by-case basis and
providing alternative education
programs for students too sick to at-
tend class.

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