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December 06, 1985 - Image 16

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-12-06
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w w V

9

E

COVER

RELI

o~ffaRith
By Rachel Gottlieb
W NDING THEIR way through
Leningrad, driven by a desire to elp
peopl wo are big hedprioe i
their own homeland eitwoaUniversity
rfsenik families last summer.
he Jsnewish families are among
10,000 families that have applied to
leave nnthe Soviet Unin but have been
denied exit visas. They are among
400,000 families that have requested
invitations from a broad - a
prerequisite to applying for exit
visas.
After such applications, Jews are
often fired, demoted, or denied
promotions at their jobs. Harassment
by the KGB is common, as is
harassment by colleagues.
Refuseniks have been arrested on
trumped-up charges of 'hooliganism'
and 'anti-Soviet activity,' and in some
cases have been imprisoned and tor-
tured.
After being lost for three hours,
LSA seniors Jennifer Roth and Karen
Muchin finally found the apartment of

the Bagamolny family. They walked
in silence up the steps of the dimly lit
concrete building, being careful not to
draw attention to themselves by
speaking English, which could poten-
tially endanger the Bagamolnys, who
are not allowed to fraternize with
Westerners.
Once inside the apartment, the
students were quickly ushered into a
tiny room to avoid confrontation with
on f BenamnBagmony's
colleagues, who ais in another rooms.
Tay Bagmon etered the rom
and in hushed and hurried whipers
she begged the students for news and
shared the details of her situation.
Later, Benjamin joined the studen-
ts for dinner. "They were so warm to
us," Roth said. "Tanya cooked us a
large dinner, and they were so happy
to see us. Their warmth made us feel
lie we hda purpose.
BENJAMIN BAGAMOLNY is list-
ed as "the most refusenik" in the
Guiness Book of World Records. He
has been waiting for an emigration
visa for the past 19 years. Bagamolny
has been refused, in part, because he
served in the Soviet military in 1971
and, according to the Soviet gover-
nment, this makes him a security
risk. Bagamolny asserts that he was
not privy to military secrets during
his service.
Tanya Bagamolny has been waiting
for an exit visa for three years. "She
is suffering very much," said
Natasha Sauerbilov, Tanya's sister,

who now lives in San Francisco. When
Tanya applied for her exit visa she
was fired from her job as a professor
at the University of Moscow. Accor-
ding to Natasha, Tanya is having
trouble adjusting to her new life.
Raoth and Muchin are members of
the University-based chapter of
Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry,
which has adopted the Bagamolny
family. Another member, LSA senior
Marcy Fleischer, visited five
refusenik families last summer. In
Moscow, she visited an American-
born ref usenik, Abe Stolar.
Stolar was born in Chicago in 1911,
but when his father returned to
Russia in 1931, the family travelled
with him. In 1936 Stolar's father was
arrested in Stalin's purges, and one
year later his mother and sister were
arrested. They all died in the Gulag
Archipelago. Stolar escaped arrest
and later fought the Nazis in the
Russian Army. In 1975, Stolar, his
wife Gitta, and their son Mikhail ap-
plied for exist visas, which were gran-
ted that year-.
"But when thy got on the plane to
leave, the KGB made them get off -
they said Gitta's passport was not in
order. She was accused of having
done classified work after she
retired," Fleisher said.
The Stolars were f orced to
relinquish their Soviet citizenship
when they applied to emigrate. They
also gave up their apartment, and are
now, "living out of suitcases," accor-
ding to Fleisher.
In March 1985, Stolar was told to
resubmit his application for exit
mission to leave. Although Stolar has
been waiting for his visa for over 10
years, "he's in good spirits because
he hs a lot of friends in America who'

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sounds silly, right? I have to agree.
Then again, it works. Ian Ast-
bury, is a kind of a jerk, granted, with
his majestic themes, but he's got one
rockin' crew of Sitting Bulls behind
him. Side two is treat with "Phoenix"
- a megalomaniac ode to Hendrix
solos, "Hollow Man" and "She Sells
Sanctuary" - groovy, snotty Stones-
ish freakouts. They want to be rock
stars, let's face it. There's really no
reason they shouldn't be, here in
America, land of the braves.
-Richard Williams
This Mortal Coil - It'll End
in Tears (Atco)
Love has failed again. You walk
home among the gray autumn trees
and then climb the stairs to your cold,
quiet room. The silence is too painful.
Now is the time to listen to something
really depressing. If you've been
wrapping yourself in paisley threads
and dragging on clove cigarettes for
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the past year or so, chances are many
bands are too passe to fit your mood.
Indeed, moodiness must be in now, as
This Mortal Coil's album, It'll End in
Tears, can surely attest to. Songs
about failed love never seem
to go out of style.
T.M.C. is actually a studio project
which brings together members of
such fashionable, cutting-edge Brit
bands as the Cocteau Twins, Colour
Box, and Dead Can Dance. The
resulting album sounds like mood
music made by pop musicians. A
reasonably good effort, as it assumes
its listeners want something in-
telligent and different.
Unfortunaely, T.M.C. never.
relaxes enough to enjoy its fancy
studio equipment. Instead, every cut
on the album must proclaim "ART!"
with much sweaty, furrow-browed
labor.
T.M.C. is fond of experimentin
with strings and sythesizers and the
effect is often pleasing. A sweet cello
weaves its way in and out of an

"almost-does-justice" cover of Alex
Chilton's lovely "Kangaroo." The
cello works well against Gordon
Sharp's distinctive vocals, and the
usual guitar, drums, and bass bed-
ding. Elizabeth Fraser's voice floats
like lace above a baroque string sec-
tion on "Another Day"; she makes
the lyrics incomprehensible, but it
doesn't matter. Her voice works like
any other instrument - in this case, a
soulful flute.
Alas! the album gets bogged down
too soon in Creative Expression.
Another Chilton cover, "Holocaust,"
has a self-pitying, hypochondriac
piano and only Chilton's good lyrics to
pull it through. "Fond Affections," a
song originally from Rema-Rema, in-
vites us to . . . all sit down and cry
and you'd almost take them up on it if
it weren't for the song's loony, slow-
motion '40s melody.
The instrumentals on the album are
more successful, however. "The Last
Ray" begins with a moody syn-
thesizer and drum background, and

later adds a pleasant guitar line.
Soon, flecks of acoustic guitar poke
through the musical weave like
sunlight in the trees.
"FYT" is industrial pop music with
the expected factory noises; the tune
- played on a synthesizer - is static
and the noises behind it change. It's a
different approach, and it's certainly
not relaxing.
"Barramundi" is an instrumental
that uses the sounds of the sea and a
wimpy melody; it works neither as
mood music nor pop music, though it
is pleasant in a dazed, stupid way.
Lisa Gerrard of Dead Can Dance
contributes the most interesting in-
strumentals. Her voice floats dream-
like and menacing in "Dreams Made
Flesh." The song, with an anxious
string background, is like a bad night
at a mental institution. Gerrard's
voice also floats and dives amid an
odd fog of instruments in "Waves
Become Wings," a song that sounds
like an Islamic chant. Gerrard uses a
looped accordion that drones away
like a walk through a Middle-Eastern

BENJAMIN BAGAMOLNY: He's still waiting. . .

SoEERY TU E SDAY ALL S EATS
50MONDAY THRU FRIDAY F

I
I

treated that badly," said Fleisher.
Most refuseniks, however, don't
share Stolar's high spirits, and are
looking to the West for support, as

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Jennifer Roth found in her visit with
the Bagamolnys.
"The Bagamolnys feel desperate
and abandoned," Roth said. Benjy's
been attacked on the street, and their
several times," she added.
While Roth was visiting the
Bagamolny family, Tanya's friend
Olga, also a refusenik, stopped by en
route to Siberia. -
hear attck a a ork campd in
Sberia. Olga heard about the attack
what her husband's condition was. He
had been sentenced to hard labor for
being an activist and speaking out for
human rights," Roth said.
"UTHAT CAN YOU say to a
VTwoman who is going to Siberia
- alone - just to knock on a
gate . . . not even knowing if anyone
would talk to her? All we could do was
cry," Roth said.
According to Karen Muchin, Tanya
Bagamolny is convinced that Jews in
the free world aren't doing enough to
hp te rfuseniks. Muchin descried
womanewho is alwaysetrying toi get
Natasha in California, and said,
'atshau isn't doing anything to help
Contac ted several week s ago,
Natasha said, "I'm doing all I can.
I'm writing to everyone I can think of.
I can't understand it. Deep in my

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- - 4... ~ 6,1985. - ~ . .-----.. ....~..

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