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December 03, 1985 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, December 3, 1985-- Page 5

COMPUTERS

Fron
Richmond, Va. (AP) - Ar-
chaeologists are turning to Space Age
technology to help them unlock Stone
Age secrets.
Microcomputers are being used to
store notes, pinpoint sites and even
take pictures of historic treasures as
their smaller sizes and price tags
make them a practical tool for ar-
chaeologists.
MICROCOMPUTERS have
revolutionized the work ar-
chaeologists do," said Sylvia Gaines,
associate anthropology professor at
Arizona State University in Tempe.
Virginia's Department of Highways
and Transportation uses a computer
to store data about sites on or eligible
O for the National Register of Historic
1 Places, said Lyle Browning, senior
archaeologist.
"Then if we're going to run a high-
way over that location, we ask the
computer to tell us what's there,"
he said.
ARCHAEOLOGISTS also use comput-
ers as electronic draftsman, creating
maps from coordinates fed into the
machine, according to Marley Brown,
director of archaeological excavation
at Colonial Williamsburg.

digs

to

databases

Archaeologists turn
more to computers

Some archaeologists share infor-
mation by trading disks, but only on a
regional basis.
The technology exists to operate a
nationwide data network, according
to Gaines, but a method to safeguard
the sensitive information has to be
devised before one can be used.
HACKERS who top into the systems
"could sell the information to pot hun-
ters who go to a site and dig up pots,
ornaments and jewelry, and then sell
them for megabucks," she said.
Computer archaeology is not
limited to the United States.
Archaeologists from five countries
working at Carthage in Tunis used
computers to reduce the confusion of
communicating in five languages,
Gaines said.
COMPUTERS were also used to
examine the relation of Britain's

Stonehenge to celestial events, to
studey Neolithic houses along the
Danube River and to explore sites in
Mexico.
Archaeologists' increased use of
computers prompted Gaines to create
"Advances in Computer
Technology," a semiannual
publication that circulates in 21 coun-
tries.
Archaeology students are taking
courses in word processing and
programming, Ms. Gaines said, and
the Society of American Archaeology
offers seminars on computers to
professionals.
AT VIRGINIA Commonwealth
University in Richmond, ar-
chaeological research lab director
Dan Mouer links a video camera to a
computer to record pictures of ar-
tifacts at excavation sites.

Mouer said he can send the
digitized gray-scale images, similar
to photocopies, to other ar-
chaeologists for consultation.
Computers also cut the tedium of
some chores, the scientists say. Ar-
chaeologists who use them as word
processors say it enables them to
transcribe notes for reports in half the
usual time. Mouer uses a portable
computer as an electronic notebook in
the field.
ELSEWHERE in Virginia, ar-
chaeologists at sites in Weyanoke and
Claremont Manor are writing their
own computer program because they
found commercial ones were
designed primarily for business use.
Archaeologist Paul Peebles said the
program will allow him to make a
finer and more efficient analysis of
the three-quarters of a million ar-
tifacts collected from the two exten-
sive sites.
"But the computer is still just a
tool," he said, "it can't do the final
analysis."
"The computer is letting us do.
things that no one ever even con-
sidered doing before because it took
too much time."

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Chips
shirink
Christmas
gadgets

By the Associated Press
Santa Claus may think small electronically
when it comes to stocking stuffers this year,
because replacing the standard fare of fruit and
candy could be a miniature stereo system or a
phone-answering machine the size of a paperback
book.
Electronic microchips, increasingly more
powerful in terms of expanded function, have led
microcircuitry to a new level of smallness, notes
Mark Kernowski, a digital design engineer who
works with telephone-answering machines.
TECHNOLOGY is progressing so rapidly, he
says that within five years answering devices
could become smaller than today's models, some
of which measure about 41-by-6 inches.
"For this to happen, semiconductor memory
would have to be employed, meaning that a chip

would replace the tape in recording the infor-
mation," according to Karnowski, of Phone-Mate
in Torrance, Calif.
Industry marketing sources report sales of
audio electronics relatively constant in recent
years, although the answering machine has had to
fight for acceptance. But with the development in
the art of miniaturization also has come a shift
toward simplicity, and the machine is now less in-
timidating.
"The buying public is becoming more and more
receptive to the answering machine," says Bob
Jaeger, vice president of merchandising for
Macy's, San Francisco. "The machines are much
more consumer-oriented than say, 10 years ago.
"People were turned off by them because they
perceived them as being too complicated, and in
some instances they were."

Associated Press

Conference From Space

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AIDS task force debated

(Continued from Page 1)
information," and added, "I don't
think anyone knows what's hap-
pening" in terms of policy.
Health Service has published a
pamphlet in response to queries about
the disease entitled "What Everyone
Should Know." It also sent a letter to
all students inviting them to use its
services along with forty health-
related pamphlets as information
sources.
The Health Education Office
within the Health Service currently
serves students with questions about
AIDS through its various outreach
programs in residence halls that are
set up upon request of residence staff.
Late last month, the housing office
held an in-service session on AIDS for
housing officials and building direc-
tors.
Marvin Parnes, housing program
director, said the purpose of the in-
service was to provide some "basic
information to people ... and to talk
about approaches to education so they
can go off and access what is needed
in their areas."
People at the meeting "felt that
education and information should be
made available," Parnes said, but
"no one is feeling that there's any
kind of crisis here."
"We have no plans for a housing-
wide program," he added.
Parnes said that educational efforts
would be left up to individual building
directors since they now have the in-
formation and are "in a better
position to judge what would be help-
ful in their building."
John Heidke, associate director for
housing education, said the housing
office has come up with an internal
statement that they have "no inten-
tion of moving people out of the
The Undergraduate
Law Club
presents:
Allan Stillwagon
Dean of Admissions,
U of M Law School.
Tuesday, December 3
7 p.m., Michigan Union
ANDERSON ROOM
PIZZA HUT
Now accepting applications
for Cooking and Waiting day-
time and evening help.

residence halls who would be suspec-
ted of or confirmed of having AIDS."
Parnes also said he personally feels
the housing office "will make every
effort to protect the rights of people
with AIDS from unwarrented
harassment and prejudice."
But several students expressed the
desire to see an AIDS victim kicked
out of the residence hall situation.
LSA freshman Michael Gerow said
he would like to see a University-wide
program on AIDS so more people
would know about the disease. "Most
people want to avoid it (AIDS)," he
said. If a person living in the dorm is
found to have AIDS, "I can see people
saying ... get him out."
An LSA sophomore, who asked that
his name be withheld, agreed with
Gerow that most residents would be
upset and would want the person to
leave the dorm. He added that
residents would "not harass them;
just avoid them."
Valerie Salkin, an LSA sophomore,
said dorm workshops on AIDS
probably wouldn't be helpful because
students would fear their friends
would think they were gay if they at-
tended.
Tomorrow: The gay community's
reaction to the AIDS outbreak.

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