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December 02, 1985 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Monday, December 2, 1985- Page 5

Peres issues apology
to U.S. over spy case

(Continued from Page 1)
completely," Peres told the Cabinet.
"Our relations with the United
States are based on solid foundations
of deep friendship, close affinity and
mutual trust," Peres said.
SECRETARY of State George
Shultz, en route to South America,
said, "I think this is an excellent
statement and we are satisfied by it
and we welcome it. We have full con-
fidence in Israel's determination and
ability to pursue this case down to the
last detail and to bring those respon-
sible to account."
It was Israel's first apology since
the Federal Bureau of Investigation
arrested Pollard and accused the 31-
year-old American Jew of selling
military secrets to Israel for $50,000
over the last 18 months.
His wife, Anne Henderson-Pollard,
was arrested the next day and
charged with unauthorized possession
of national defense documents.
Peres' government hopes its
belated apology to the United States
for using a U.S. Navy analyst as a spy
will stem the controversy and prevent
lasting damage to U.S.-Israeli ties.
THE STRAIN caused by the arrest
of Pollard, was the worst since the rift
created when Israel invaded Lebanon
in June 1982.

Officials and commentators ex-
pressed fear that a continuing flap
would affect Israel's relations with
the U.S. Congress, which has been
generous in providing economic and
military aid totaling $4 billion in 1985.
Pending legislation includes a
proposal to reduce interest rates on
the repayment of debts from 11 percent
to 7 percent. The change could have a
major impact on Israel's economic
recovery program by saving the
treasury an estimated $700 million, of-
ficials said.
CONGRESS has also supported
Israel on key policy questions such as
a U.S. arms sale to Jordan that had
been proposed by President Reagan's
administration as an enticement to
the Arabs for peacemaking.
There was also concern the Pollard
case might provoke a change in public
opinion that would rebound on the
Jewish community in the United
States, which numbers about 6
million.
"The shadow cast by the Pollard af-
fair on U.S. Jewry is no less severe
than the tension caused by the affair
between the two governments," the
liberal Haaretz daily said in an
editorial yesterday.
HAARETZ said Jews had "per-
suaded most of the American public

that the support they offer to every
Israeli interest does not contradict
their devotion to their American
homeland."
The statement did not relate to U.S.
demands that Israel return documen-
ts it allegedly bought from Pollard
and allow questioning of two Israeli
diplomats who were recalled from the
United States last week. But Israel
Television said the government would
probably accede to both these
requests.
Israeli officials have stressed the
Pollard case did not extend to the up-
per echelon of government. But some
sources, who spoke on condition of
anonymity, said the probe had un-
covered unexpected activity that
could be politically explosive.
They refused to elaborate, but said
it was unlikely that all the information
on the unit's activity will ever be
published.
In unusually tough language, the
State Department criticized Israel
Friday for failing to "provide the full
and prompt cooperation we requested
a week ago."
President Reagan said in his weekly
radio address Saturday that the
United States will "root out and
prosecute the spies of any nation." He
did not mention specific names.

**
Michigan Guild's Christmas Art Fair
December 7 & 8
Hours: Saturday 10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Sunday 11:00 am - 5:00 pm
150 artists at the University of Michigan COLISEUM
(located at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Hill Street.)
" FREE PARKING " $1.00 admission " Children under 12 FREE."

State poll split on divestment
(Continued from Page 1)

Michigan's colleges, universities
and cities are being pressured for
similar actions regarding their in-
vestment portfolios.
Of those surveyed, 48 percent had
heard or read about apartheid and 51
percent had not.
AMONG THOSE familiar with the
issue, 83 percent could identify it
correctly as a form of racial
discrimination practiced by the
government of South Africa.

Knowledge and information about
apartheid were strongly related to in-
come and education, but not to race.
Men were more familiar with and
knowledgeable about the issue than
women.
Those familiar with the apartheid
issue were presented with two alter-
native positions on divestiture.
Fourty-seven percent of those
familiar with the apartheid issue
agreed the American government and

corporations should not invest in
South Africa as long at it practices
apartheid, while 45 percent felt in-
vestments and other forms of contact
are important to influence the South
African government to change its
policy.
Divestiture was more likely to be
supported by Democrats (57 percent),
those with lower levels of income (58
percent), black respondents (81 per-
cent), and women (54 percent).

ted,
syst
wro
sidi
TH
wer
tim
wer
agg
ple
chin
per,
pero
enf
ther

Few report rapes, si
(Continued from Page 1) percent were reported by the victims,
they remain hidden from the 13 percent by another household
em that was established to deter member and 22 percent by other
ngdoing. Hidden crime is in-pople.
ous because you cannot fight it." pe eq
HE SURVEY showed that rapes for not reporting crimes, the study
e reported only 47 percent of the concluded, was that the victim "felt
e. Other crime reporting rates that the incident was not important
"e: robbery, 52 percent; ta h icdn wsntimotn
ravated assault, 58 percent; sim- enough." For violent crimes, the
rassautd ssa41, percent; ursm-reason most often given, 28 percent of
assault, 41 percent; purse-snat- the time, was that "it was a private or
ig, 51 percent; and burglary, 49 personal matter."
cent. CRIMINOLOGISTS and law enfor-
f the personal crimes reported, 3 cement policy makers in recent years
cent had been discovered by law have tended to put more stock in the
orcement authorities, and figures and trends reported by the
efore went into police logs. Sixty Bureau of Justice Statistics. These ex-

1

uay says
perts argue that the mere routing of
reported crimes to the FBI's
headquarters by some 16,000 state and
local law enforcement agencies un-
derstates the nature of the crime
problem.
ANN ARBOR
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Your best buy'
322S. State St.
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Read and Use Daily Classifieds

Cartoon
moose loses
.his. voice
(Continued from Page 1)
SCOTT ALSO was the voice behind
Mountie Dudley DoRight; Mr.
Peabody, a supergenius dog, and
George in the Tarzan takeoff,
"George in the Jungle."
Scott was raised in New Jersey and
attended college in Denver, Colo. He
entered the animation field at the end
of World War II and became a story
man and script writer for Warner
Bros., where he worked on Bob Clam-
pett's televised puppet show, "Time
for Beany."
Scott moved to United Productions
of America, where he wrote cartoons
in the 1950s. The production company
won an Academy Award for best
animation for "Gerald McBoing-
Boing" in 1950, a cartoon adapted
from a Dr. Seuss story.
In 1958, Scott joined Jay Ward
Productions, maker of the Rocky
*shows, and still was affiliated with the
production company when he died.

A e
.p

What's
Happening

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