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December 02, 1985 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-12-02

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, December 2, 1985 1

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.:ems oppose
WASHINGTON (AP) - President "They
Reagan's judicial nominees, once Ronald
they are confirmed, could leave a judges,"
conservative mark on the federal General
judiciary, for decades. But for now assistant
they face testy Democrats who are "They're
escalating their rhetoric and their (procedu
tactics against.the nominees. Democ- somehow
rats, unaccustomed to being the like the
minority party in the Senate, are ac- out."
cusing Republicans of relentlessly
rushing candidates through the con- The out
firmation process. far long
They have threatened to block all Reagan b
judicial nominees, have used a 761 feder,
parliamentary move to abruptly halt in the ba
a confirmation hearing, and have give prospects
individual candidates a rough time. other va
THE nominees themselves have trition, a
remained humble and subdued, have ap
cautiously showing off their calm federal j
judicial temperament. But the office.
Reagan administration has been WITH
iore than willing to jump into the Democra
fray on their behalf. Recently

Reagan's judicial nominees

don't like the idea that
Reagan is nominating
said Grover Rees, Attorney
Edwin Meese III's special
on judicial nominations.
looking for phony process
ral) issues, saying that
this is a railroad. They don't
way the '84 election turned
tcome of the dispute will last
ger than election results.
has named 233 of the nation's
al judges, 28 candidates are
ckground-check pipeline and
s are being sought for 29
acancies. Add normal at-
nd it is likely Reagan will
pointed a majority of the
udges by the time he leaves
THE stakes so high,
ats refuse to play dead.
, Sen. Joseph Biden of

Delaware, ranking Democrat on the
Judiciary Committee, told the panel:
"Not a single judge will get out of
my committee or off the floor, if we
can help it, unless we agree to an or-
derly procedure by which we can
process these judges and investigate
them fully.
Biden is demanding at least five
weeks' time between a candidate's
return of a committee questionairre
and a committee vote, a limit to three
nominees in one day's confirmation
hearings, and inclusion of additional
questions posed to the nominees.
THE NEW information sought by
Democrats includes a nominee's
plublic statements and speeches,
details of political contributions
received for those who ran for office,
how much time they spent serving the
disadvantaged, and whether they
belong to any organization that

discriminates on the basis of race, sex
or religion.
Democrats also demand to know
whether the nominee gave assurances
to anyone involved in the selection
process regarding their position on
any issue - an obvious response to
those who believe there should be a
conservative litmus test for judicial
candidates.
An attempt at peacemaking will be
scheduled soon, with a delegation of
Democrats led by Minority Leader
Robert Byrd meeting with
Republicans headed by Majority
Leader Robert Dole.
But until the meeting, neither side is
taking steps to cool the dispute. On the
contrary :
" On Nov. 7, Democrats led a
charge on the Senate floor that almost
scuttled the nomination of Alex
Kozinski to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals.

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IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
S.A. union opposes pass laws
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South Africa's biggest union
federation, 1 day old and claiming to represent 400,000 workers, allied it-
self with black anti-apartheid activists yesterday and demanded that
restrictive pass laws be abandoned within six months.
In another development, South Afrcan and U.S. business executives
were reported stepping up pressure on the government to end its system
of racisl segragation, under which 5 million whites dominate 24 million
voteless blacks.
Pass laws require blacks to carry documents proving that they have
permission to work or live in or near white areas. The laws result in tens
of thousands of blacks being prosecuted each year, and are a foundation
of apartheid. The laws also mean separation for many black families,
with the husband working in an area where his family is not permitted to
live.
The South African Press Association quoted Barayi as telling inter-
viewers later that the federation aimed to fill a vacuum created when the
African National Congress guerrilla movement was banned in the 1960s.
The federation was formed Saturday in Durban and claims 36 affiliated
unions with more than 400,000 members -nearly 40 percent of South
Africa's 14 million unionized workers.
Senate to vote on PAC limit
WASHINGTON - The Senate is set to take its first vote this week on a
proposal to limit money that members of Congress can accept from
political action committees, the fastest growing source of campaign fun-
ds.
Supporters contend lawmakers' consciences will be tested by the vote,
while opponents argue that the proposed restrictions will infringe on the
political process and need further study.
Both sides agree on two points: PAC contributions to incumbents in
Congress are soaring, and the outcome of tomorrow's scheduled roll call
is uncertain.
"This is the first Senate vote that squarely faces the issue of whether-
PACs are a problem. That's an important test for every senator," says
Sen. David Boren (D-Okla.).
His bill would restrict House candidates to $100,000 in PAC money
during each two-year election cycle. Senate limits would range from
$175,000 to $750,000, depending on a state's population.
This week's showdown is the first time in eight years that campaign
finance reform has even been debated on the Senate floor. In 1977, a
House-passed bill to create public financing was killed by a'filibuster.
Malfunction shuts down reactor
MIDDLETOWN, Pa. - The Unit No. 1 nuclear reactor at Three Mile
Island automatically shut down yesterday when an electrical generator
malfunctioned. No emergency was declared but some radioactive
steam was vented into the air.
"No emergency condition exists or was declared at the plant," said
Lisa Robinson, a spokeswoman for GPU Nuclear Corp., the company that
operates the plant. She said she did not know when the plant could resume
operation.
Control rods dropped into the reactor's core at about 2:10 a.m. yester-
day to cut off the nuclear reaction when the generator malfunctioned, she
said.
Although the steam contained a "minute amount" of radiation, she
said, it "was of no consequence to public health and safety."
Aquino 's widow may run
against Marcos for presidency
MANILA, Philippines - Corazon Aquino, widow of Benigno Aquino,
promised a cheering crowd of 15,000 yesterday that "you will hear what
you want to hear" when she announces this week whether she will run for
president.
Mrs. Aquino, who would oppose incumbent President Ferdinand Mar-
cos, told the crowd at Santo Domingo Cathedral that she would make her
"official announcement" next week.
Inside the cathedral, a priest sprinkled holy water on bundles of
1,200,286 signatures uring Mrs. Aquino to run in next year's elections.
Mrs. Aquino, 52, had stipulated that 1 million signatures had to be collec-
ted supporting her candidacy before she would consider the race.
The Mass came on the eve of the reading of the verdict in the trial of 26
defendants, all but one from the military, accused in the August 1983
shooting of former Sen. Benigno Aquino.
Aquino, Marco's chief rival, was assassinated at Manilla Airport when
he returned from three years of self-imposed exile in the United States.
Aquino murder suspects deared
MANILA, Philippines - Three civilian judges acquitted armed forces
chief Gen. Fabian Ver and 25 other defendants yesterday of all charges in
the assassination of opposition leader Benigno Aquino, saying the killer
was Rolando Galman.
The court ordered all defendants released.
About 100 angry demonstrators outside the courtroom pounded on the
metal lamp posts as three court clerks, over a period of more than two
hours, read the verdict clearing all defendants of double murder charges
n the deaths of both Aquino and Galraan, an alleged communist agent.
"It is safer to error in acquitting than in punishing," the court said. It

said acts attributed to Ver, who had been accused of covering up the
crime, were "not indicative of mischief."
The verdict was carried live on both government and private television
networks.
"Thank God, it's all over," Ver said as he left the courtroom. Asked if
he was ever in doubt of the decision, he replied: "Never, because there
was never any cause for accusing me or indicting me."
01 he MUichigan lVaiIQg
Vol XCVI - No. 61
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the Fall and Winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April - $18.00 in Ann Arbor; $35.00 outside the city. One term -
$10.00 in town; $20.00 out of town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and Sub-
scribes to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles
Times Syndicate, and College Press Service.

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COOKIES
NIGHT OWLS TAKE A STUDY BREAK!
Buy 2 or more of Mrs. Peabody's cookies
or brownies after 9:00 p.m. and get
a FREE beverage!

Special Feature:
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DECEMBER 1, 1985

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Editor in Chief.................NEIL CHASE
Opinion Page Editors.......... JODY BECKER
JOSEPH KRAUS
Managing Editors ......GEORGEA KOVANIS
JACKIE YOUNG
News Editor..............THOMAS MILLER
Features Editor...........LAURIE DELATER
City Editor .............. ANDREW ERIKSEN
Personnel Editor........... TRACEY MILLER
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks, Laura
Bischoff, Rebecca Blumenstein, Joanne Cannella,
Philip Chidel, Dov Cohen, Kysa Connett, Tim
Daly.,Nancy Driscoll, Rob Earle, Rachel Gottlieb,
Stephen Gregory. Linda Holler, Mary Chris
Jakelevic, Vibeke Laroi, Jerry Markon, Eric Mat-
tson, Amy Mindell, Kery Murakami, Jill
Oserowsky, Christy Riedel, Michael Sherman,
Jennifer Smith, Jeff Widman, Cheryl Wistrom.
Associate Opinion Page Editor .. KAREN KLEIN
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Gayle Kirshenbaum,
David Lewis, Henry Park, Peter Mooney, Susanne
Skubik

Chief Photographer ...............DAN HABIB
PHOTO STAFF: Jae Kim, Scott Lituchy, John
Munson, Matt Petrie, Dean Randazzo, Andi
Schreiber, Darrian Smith.
Sports Editor ................. TOM KEANEY
Associate Sports Editors..........JOE EWING
BARB McQUADE, ADAM MARTIN.
PHIL NUSSEL, STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: DaveAretha Mark Borowsky,
Debbie Frances, Liam Flaherty, Steve Green-
baum, Rachel Goldman, Jon Hartmann, Darren
Jasey, Phil Johnson, Rick Kaplan, Christian Mar-
tin, Scott Miller, Greg Molzon, Brad Morgan,
Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis. Chris Parker, Mike
Redstone, Duane Roose, Jeff Rush, Scott Shaffer,
Pete Steinert, Douglas Volan.
Business Manager .........DAWN WILLACKER
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Classified Manager...G.GAYLA BROCKMAN
DISPLAY SALES: Lori Baron, Sheryl Biesman,
c. -. L.ni 91- r A. n r.. v

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