100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 22, 1985 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 5 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 22, 1985
Jazz for Life'

recruits stars to help the poor

(Continued from Page 1)
"THIS IS a problem which is
foreboding for everyone. As the un-
derclass expands, who is going to
provide money for social security?
"People look very disfavorably on
welfare, but everyone needs an oppor-
tunity to participate in society and, by
ignoring these children and their
problems, the middle class is acting
against its own best interest. This is a
very future-oriented project - the
children are the future," Johnson con-
tinued.
Fundraising for the program begins
at tomorrow's Michigan-Ohio State
football game, where Jazz for Life
will sell T-shirts to make money to get
the project off the ground.
JAZZ FOR Life's plans call for a
Spring '86 pilot concert at Hill
Auditorium to kick off the project. A
six-week series of community-based
projects staged nationwide will begin
in September, culminating in mid-
October with a national Jazz for Life

'This is a very future-oriented project -
the children are the future.'
- Louis Johnson
Jazz for Life organizer

Festival drawing together the biggest
names in jazz.
Johnson hopes to generate several
million dollars in ticket sales alone.
Jazz for Life is also currently
negotiating a record deal for a com-
pilatory jazz album.
So far, Johnson and Woodruff have
contacted celebrities - ranging from
jazz greats George Benson and Wyn-
ton Marsalis - to comedian Bill
Cosby and NBA star Kareem Abdul
Jabbar. All are interested in

cooperating with the project, Johnson
said.
CBS RECORDS and United Way
public relations representatives with
whom Johnson has met say the
students' youth and inexperience in
the fund-raising arena could be ex-
tremely positive factors in securing
corporate and other assistance.
Thus far, the program has been
mostly funded by Johnson and
Woodruff. They will be meeting soon
with representatives from Stroh's and
Domino's in an attempt to secure cor-
porate sponsorship.
Terry Lynn Tilton, a board member
and founding member of the National
Academy of Jazz, a non-profit cor-
poration dedicated to the advan-
cement of the art form, said she is ex-
cited about working with Jazz for Life
and will likely serve on the project's
Board of Directors.
"THEY'VE GOT the energy to get it

together," Tilton said. "They have a
cause and a reason motivating them,
and they know where they need help.
They're not big-headed - they are
reaching out to people with experien-
One of the first people Johnson con-
facted to help with the project was Dr.
Herb Wong, president of the National
Association of Jazz Educators and
Palo Alto Records. Wong, a former
ecology professor who has been in-
volved with the interconnections of
human/ecological studies and jazz,
responded with enthusiasm to the
idea.
"It seemed that at last there was a
project that would gather the many
threads of society and culture for the
basic human problems that the
project is aimed at solving," Wong
said.
Sarri said the need to assist im-
poverished youth is great. "One out of
four children in America live in pover-
ty. A majority of poor people in the
U.S. are children," she said.
JOHNSON and Woodruff haven't
had as much success rounding up
student volunteers as they've had in
recruiting big-name stars.
"The crux of the problem," Johnson
said, "is that the central thing has
been two law students barnstorming
the country and making national con-
tacts ... We've made big strides and
now we have to consolidate in Ann Ar-
bor. Right now we have a core group

of just six or seven graduate students
who are putting in a lot of time."
Jazz for Life has doled out two
projects to graduate school
professors. MBA students, under the
guidance of David Brophy, are
working on a budget, while Prof.
Mary Anne Watson's communication
class is putting together a video which

will describe the program. Sarri is
seeking child care programs in need
of financial assistance.
The group is looking for studentsrto
work ~on media relations, funding, ar-
twork, and securing performers.
Johnson said he is trying to secure
academic credit for students who
become involved.

HAPPENINGS
(Continued from Page 3)
University Club - Pre-game champagne all-you-can-eat-brunch, 10
a.m., University Club.
William L. Clements Library - Special exhibit, Mackinac Island,
"Furs, Fudge and Forts," 9 a.m., Clements Library.
Sunday
Highlight
The International Affairs Education Project will sponsor a talk on the
results of the Geneva summit tonight. Speakers include Daniel Axelrod of
the department of physics and the Union of Concerned Scientists, Joanne
Watson of the Detroit YWCA and Edward L. Palmer, executive director
of the Black Press Institute in Chicago. The forum will begin at 7 p.m., in
the Pond room of the Union.
Films
Alternative Action - Question of Silence, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., Aud. A,
Angell Hall.
Chinese Student Assoc. - Aces Go Places, 1 p.m.; Actresses Behind the
Stage, 3 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Cinema Guild - Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, 7 p.m.; Look
Back in Anger, 8:40 p.m., Natural Science Bldg.
Hill StCinema - Wooden Gun, 7:15 & 9 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Mediatrics - African Queen, 7:30 p.m.; Caine Mutiny, 9:30 p.m., MLB
4.
Performances
Ark - Tom Chapin, 8 p.m., 637 S. Main.
Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra - In concert with youth soloist, 3:30
p.m., Michigan Theater.
Performance Network - Sticks and Bones, 8 p.m., 408 W. Washington.
School of Music - Opera, Cosi fan Tutte, Mozart, 2 p.m., Mendelssohn
Theater, University Players, Marathon 33, Patricia Boyette, director,
Trueblood, 2 p.m.
School of Music - Faculty Recital, Michigan Chamber Players; Per-
cussion Ensemble, Michael Udow, conductor, 8 p.m., Vocal Arts Theater;
Trombone recital, Jeff Ballast, 2 p.m., Recital Hall; Violin, Timothy Ed-
wards, 4 p.m., Recital Hall; Double Bass, Ma.
School of Music - Michigan Chamber Players, 8p.m., Rackham Aud.
University Music Society - New Philadelphia String Quartet, 4 p.m.,
Rackham Aud.
Speakers
Women's Action for Nuclear Disarmament - Arthur Vander, "Com-
mon Sense and the Prevention of Nuclear War," 7:30 p.m., 1679 Broad-
way.
Meetings
Alpha Phi Omega - 7 p.m., Michigan Union.
Miscellaneous
Hillel - Israeli folk dancing, 7:30 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
His House Christian Fellowship - Dinner, 6 p.m.; Bible study, 7 p.m.,
925 E. Ann.
Lutheran Campus Ministry - Worship, 10:30 a.m., Lord of Light.
University Lutheran Chapel - Worship, 9:15 & 10:30 a.m.; Supper, 6
p.m., 1511 Washtenaw.
WELS Campus Ministry - Reformation worship, 10 a.m., Redeemer
Lutheran Church.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109
i I

By JUNE HAVOC
f1;. ^#ftA hV Dnhiris Rnvnffn rndirn.-#&A hu Q;t-hnrd KI!2@#tepk

LOOK..
We realize that the papers
are gone by early morning.
Unfortunately for the late risers,
The Michigan Daily can't afford
to print more than 10,000 copies.
So, please, share your paper
or put it back in a rack when
you're done reading it.
THIANK YOU

U Council discusses code

(Continued from Page 1)
was brought up at last week's council
meeting at the urging of Dan Shar-
phorn, a policy advisor to the Office of
Academic Affairs and the council's
legal advisor.
Sharphorn said that while the
University is not legally responsible
for what happens in Greek or co-op
housing at the school, the courts have
recently ruled against universities.
For exampke, he said a student
successfully sued the University of
Colorado last year after he injured
himself on a trampoline in one of the
school's fraternities.
HOWEVER, Sharphorn yesterday
said there has been no precedents i
nthe state. And councilmembers
decided the University would have to
deal with such a situation if it ever
arose.
Alan Lutes, president of the Intra-
Fraternity Council, told the council
yesterday that the IFC has been able
to handle crimes in Greek houses on
its own. He added that the IFC has
been working on its own judicial
system, including a five-member
hearing panel that would be able to
apply such sanctions, as expulsion
from a fraternity.
In addition, Lutes said he felt
fraternities were being "singled out."
"We have no special relationship
with the University," Lutes said.
"We're only registered with MSA, as
is any other student organization."
One concern among councilmem-
bers has been that the IFC has a
STSNUMBER
GRELSUATT F
GRE 310-TOEFL N
GREP MPCAT LONE
DAT-MCAT-VAT IN TEST
WA 1.3 PREPARATION
An br I 48104
FM6EMS-CGFMS
SPEEOREANI-"pCB-1
ESTROMWtuxiiy2 3CLASSES FORMING NOW AT
20 3 49 .
23EHoover w i
AnnA ' 4N
In New SE ale
Stnkey M Kaplan Erucatronai Center Lid EDUCATIONAL CENTER

student account with the University,
allowing them to rent out rooms in the
Michigan Union for fraternity ac-
tivities.

COMF
-S.I

ORT AND FAX
LIVE HAPPIU
EVER AFTER

Special Sale
$2990
VALUES
TO
240

In the past, women have had
choose between fashion and cc
fort. And that's a choice that n
- never be made again. DanceSpc
offer the comfort and stability o
running shoe as well as the fashi
able look of a dance shoe. T
come in many different colors. A
?. .^.= many different styles for every fa
ion need. with DanceSports, co
:.<fortable feet are always in fashion

SHION
It0
om-
ieed
orts
A a
They"":r >: "":{. s ' ":f
end
sh-
om-
.e

Rockport

DOWNTOWN
217 S. Main
open Fri. 'til 8:30

MAST'S
VISA - MASTEIf CARD - AMERICAN EXPRESS

CAMPUS
619 E. Liberty
open Fri. 'til 8:00

U U

r

(

i

May '86 MBAs
RARE OPPORTUNITY
FOR ONLY A FEW
America's largest consumer products company, Philip Morris,
is looking for top-of-the-class MBAs due to graduate in May,
1986. They will work in corporate, domestic and international
planning and marketing at our New York World Headquarters
or divisional locations.
We're scheduled to interview on your campus on
Fehruarv 12. Tn ign un fnr an interview anl for more infor.

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan