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November 22, 1985 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-11-22

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 22, 1985

Michigan-Ohio State rivalry runs wild

(Continued from Page 1)
cheap work of art having little or no
aesthetic interest.")
MICHIGAN field general Bo
Schembechler refuses to be intimin-
dated by Ohio State. His sole
Domino's ,pizza franchise is planted
on High Street - smack dab in OSU
territory. Qf course, a franchise based
behind enmy lines does have its
drawbacks, as OSU patrons boycott
the business when the Wolverines
beat the Buckeyes.
"If OSU loses," said Domino's
worker Joe Arradine, "we do really
bad."
Although it seems unwise for
Wolverine and Buckeye fans to invade
enemy turf, many remain zealous.
Check out Ohio State's Delta Upsilon
fraternity, which is in the midst of
relaying a football from Ohio Stadium
to Michigan Stadium. Forty-five to 50
road warriors will divide up the 210-
mile charity run for- the Diabetes
Association.
ALSO TAKE note of the Ohio State
Lanterns, OSU's student newspaper's
football team. Despite being snuffed,
21-0, by the Daily Libels last year, the
Lanterns will venture to Michigan's
Tartan Turf tonight to try it again.
Libel's coach Tom Miller said the
Lanterns should stay home.
"There's no question in my mind,
Ohio State doesn't stand a chance,"
said Miller.
"We're definitely fired up. In the
mornings, I have the team wake up to
a Bob Ufer tape."
THE LANTERNS, however, have
their own booster in assistant coach
Patty Wise.
"We're going to mutilate and slan-
der the Libels," Wise barked. "Censor
them. Eradicate the whole team. Beat
them 'til they're black and blue."
Both the Lanterns and the Buckeyes
may conquer Michigan this weekend,
but it will be bittersweet day in Her-

Daily rnoTo Dy UMRRIAN ,v
A ticket scalper and student exchange big bucks for tomorrow's Michigan-Ohio State game. Some scalpers
said tickets are not selling as well as expected, due to the inclement weather expected for the game.

shey, Pa., before Ohio State beats
Michigan in the candy bar depar-
tment. At last count, the Wolverine
Bar was outselling the Buckeye Bar
400 cases to 315 cases, according to its
distributor, University Food. And ac-
cording to the latest University Food
poll, the Michigan snack ranked num-
ber three of 38-college brands sold in
the nation - six notches ahead of
OSU.

Wolverine Bars are just part of the
propaganda that is indundating Ann
Arbor's citizens. The 1985 Extirpation
Bowl News with the headline, "Blue
Pulverizes Hapless Ohioans, 28-9!" is
popping up on campus. Local stores
are also propagating "I hate Ohio
State" painter hats, "OHIWIHATE
OHIO STATE" T-shirts, and "Hap-
piness is crushed Buckeye nuts"
bumper stickers.

The propaganda is even greater in
Columbus.
"We've got five or six kinds of T-
shirts," said Hand of High Street's
College Tradition. "We have shirts
that say, 'Why go to hell when you can
ride a bus to Ann Arbor,' and 'In
Poland they tell Michigan jokes."'
"We also have a figurine. It's a dog
dressed in Ohio State colors and it's
taking a leak on a Michigan helmet."

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Bo visits Bo at practice

(continued from Page 1)
Bo and her husband John Derek
were in Detroit yesterday to purchase
a new Lincoln Town Car from the
Ford Motor Company. The car is ex-
pected to be used in another Derek
film.
BEFORE joining Wolverine prac-
tice, the Dereks took a tour of campus
with Michigan football recruiter Fritz
Seyferth.
"Gosh, it's cold," Derek said as she
stepped out of the tour van.
"SHE's coming over to eat and then
they're leaving," Schembechler said.
"I've got some game films to look

at," he said. And it's probably safe in
saying that Bo (you know which one)
won't be in any of those movies.
Incidentally, it's Bo hoo to rumors
that Bo and Bo will appear at today's
Student Alumni Council pep rally at
noon on the Diag.
"I'm not expecting her," said
organizer Chris Oldenburg.
Although the Dereks won't be
present the rally is still scheduled to
be inspiring.
"Bash a Buckeye, Boost a Child" a
Special Olympics fundraiser will take
place today on the Diag from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at Schneider's Party Store,
1336 S. Main.
Wolverine Civitan Club member
Larry Durst said his organization is
co-sponsoring the driv with the Evans
Scholars. There will be 5 bushels of
buckeyes on hand for people to smash
at $1 per buckeye.
+" +&
4lrutiE0

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
Six die in S. African violence
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Police opened fire yesterday at a
crowd of tens of thousands of black protesters outside Pretoria, witnesses
said. A newspaper reported at least six people were killed and hundreds
injured.
Police headquarters confirmed two deaths but made no mention of
violence at the gathering estimated by reporters to number more than
50,000 in Mamelodi, a sprawling black township north of Pretoria, the
country's administrative capital.
It apparently was one of the biggest confrontations in 15 months of
violence against apartheid. The legal system by which 5 million whites
rule 24 million voteless blacks. Officials say more than 800 people,
primarily blacks, have died in the rioting. Two-thirds have been killed by
police and the rest by other blacks in tribal disputes, general criminal at-
tacks, and mob violence, directed in some cases against blacks seen as
cooperating with the white government.
The Mamelodi protesters were demanding lower rents, an end to
restrictions on funerals and the departure of soldiers and extra police
from Mamelodi.
Hurricane threatens Fla.
PANAMA CITY, Fla. - Hurricane Kate charged ashore with 100 mph
winds yesterday, the first November hurricane to make landfall in half a
century, as more than 100,000 people fled waterfront homes for the fourth
time in as many months.
The hurricane spawned tornadoes that ripped the roofs off buildings in
the Panama City area, toppled Apalachicola's main water tower, and
tore down power lines and trees. Roads were washed out or blocked by
floodwaters and fallen trees.
In Florida, more than 100,000 evacuated low-lying areas in 10 counties
since Wednesday, many at the order of Gov. Bob Graham. Civil defense
officials in the region estimated 75 to 90 percent of the people under man-
datory evacuation instructions, plus thousands more voluntarily, had fled
inland.
Two people drowned off Key West and a third was killed by a fallen
tree, bringing the number of deaths attributed to the 11th storm of the
Atlantic hurricane season to at least 13.
Senate broadens Contra aid
WASHINGTON - The Senate gave final passage yesterday to a bill that
broadens U.S. support for Nicaraguan rebels - allowing unarmed air-
craft, trucks, and secure radios - although still banning U.S. military
training, advice, and lethal supplies.
The 1986 intelligence authorization bill cleared the Senate on voice vote
without debate, after winning House approval Tuesday by 387-21. The
compromise, which was hammered out by congressional negotiators,
now goes to President Reagan for his signature.
Although the bill provides undisclosed amounts for worldwide U.S. in-
telligence activities, the most controversial part remained Reagan's
support for rebels - known as Contras - fighting to overthrow
Nicaragua's leftist government.
Thebill states that the $27 million in "humanitarian" non-lethal aid, ap-
proved last summer, can be spent to buy the rebels "transportation
equipment ... so long as no modifications are made ... to inflict serious
bodily harm or death."
Congressional sources, refusing to be identified, said that section clears
the way for the administration to send unarmed planes, helicopters, am-
bulances, and trucks to the rebels and would seem to permit the vehicles
to be used later to transport military equipment or troops.
Explosion caused June's
Air-India crash, report says
NEW DELHI, India - India's director of air safety said an explosion in
the cargo hold apparently caused the crash of an Air-India jumbo jet last
June 23 in which all 329 people aboard were killed, according to his report
obtained yesterday.
The report by Hoshiar Singh Khola said the conclusion was based on
analysis of the cockpit voice recorder and the air control tower tapes at
Shannon, Ireland.
"It appears that an explosion occurred on board the aircraft," Khola
said in the 78-page report.
A copy of the report was made available to The Associated Press by a
source who requested anonymity.
The Boeing 747 plunged into the Atlantic Ocean off the Irish coast last
June on a flight from Canada to Bombay in western India.
Indian investigators have speculated that Sikh extremists planted a
bomb on the plane in Toronto, where the flight originated.
"Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests a sudden and unexpected
disaster occurred in flight," the report said.
Soviets shorten space mission
MOSCOW - The Soviet control center cut a space mission short and
brought three men back to earth from the orbiting Salyut-7 laboratory
yesterday because the commander fell ill and needed hospitalization.

It was the first time a space flight was known to have been shortened by
a crew member's illness either in the Soviet Union or the United States.
The official news agency Tass issued the first word of the mission
commander Vladimir Vasyutin's illness yesterday afternoon, more than
an hur after he and his companions made a "soft-landing" in the Soyuz
T-14 capsule on the steppes of Central Asia.
Tass usually announces the separation of space capsules from the or-
biting lab about 24 hours before cosmonauts return to Earth.
In this case, officials apparently were reluctant to acknowledge
Vasyutin's illness untill all three men were home safely.
Vol XCVI -No. 57
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the Fall and Winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April - $18.00 in Ann Arbor; $35.00 outside the city. One term -
$10.00in town; $20.00 out of town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and Sub-
scribes to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles
Times Syndicate, and College Press Service.

r

r

4

14

14

THIS IS TDKS
50TH ANNIVERSARY.

10

11

COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
Sunday Service:
9:30 a.m. at Mack School 920 Miller,
Ann Arbor
10:45 a.m. Sunday School and Adult
Bible Study
Philip H. Tiews, Pastor
For more information call 761-1999.
* * *
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division St.
Episcopal Campus Ministry
Rev. Andrew Foster, Chaplain
WEDNESDAYS at 5:00 p.m.-Libera-
tion Eucharists: Celebration of the
Holy Eucharist followed by a simple
shared meal, for people who are con-
cerned about social justice and peace.
For more info. call 665-0606
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw
Dr. Paul Foelber, Interim Pastor
663-5560
SERVING UM STUDENTS
Worship Services at 9:15
and 10:30a.m.
Sunday Supper at 6:00 p.m.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St. (between State & Division)
Sundays: 9:55 worship, 11:25 Bible
Study groups for both Undergrads and
Graduate Students.
Thursdays: 5:30 Supper (free) and
Fellowship.
CENTER OPEN EACH DAY
for information call 663-9376
ROBERT B. WALLACE, PASTOR
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1

Editor in Chief.................NElL CHASE
Opinion Page Editors .......... JODY BECKER
JOSEPH KRAUS
Managing Editors.......GEORGEAKOVANIS
JACKIE YOUNG
News Editor.............THOMAS MILLER
Features Editor........... LAURIE DELATER
City Editor..............ANDREW ERIKSEN
Personnel Editor............TRACEY MILLER
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks, Laura
Bischoff, Rebecca Blumenstein, Joanne Cannella,
PhilipChidel, Dov Cohen, Kysa Connett, Tim
Daly, Nancy Driscoll, Rob Earle, Rachel Gottlieb,
Stephen Gregory, Linda Holler, Mary Chris
Jakelevic, Vibeke Larol. Jerry Markon, Eric Mat-
tson. Amy Mindell, Kery Murakami, Jill
Oserowsky, Christy Riedel, Michael Sherman,
Jennifer Smith, Jeff Widman, Chery Wistrom.
Associate Opinion Page Editor .. KAREN KLEIN
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Gayle Kirshenbaum
David Lewis, Henry Park, Peter Mooney, Susanne

Chief Photographer...............DAN HABIB
PHOTO STAFF: Jae Kim, Scott Lituchy, John
Munson, Matt Petrie, Dean Randazzo, Andi
Schreiber, Darrian Smith.
Sports Editor ................. TOM KEANEY
Associate Sports Editors..........JOE EWING
BARB McQUADE, ADAM MARTIN,
PHIL NUSSEL, STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha, Mark Borowsky,
Debbie Frances, Liam Flaherty, Steve Green-
baum, Rachel Goldman, Jon Hartmann, Darren
Jasey, Phil Johnson, Rick Kaplan, Christian Mar-
tin, Scott Miller, Greg Molzon, Brad Morgan,
Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis, Chris Parker, Mike
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Pete Steinert, Douglas Volan.
Business Manager.......DAWN WILLACKER
Sales Manager.........MARY ANNE HOGAN
Assistant Sales Manager............ YUNA LEE
Marketing Manager........CYNTHIA NIXON
Finance Manager............ DAVID JELINEK
Classified Manager ......GAYLA BROCKMAN
DISPLAY SALES: Lori Baron. Sheryl Biesman.

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- __ _ .I _ a- I

I

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