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November 19, 1985 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-11-19

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Page 5 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 19, 1985

COMPUTERS

Greek police shoot boy,
violent rioting results

Computer conference lets
students enter their views

ATHENS, Greece (AP) -
Rioting erupted yesterday in
Athens and two other cities in nor-
thern Greece after a policeman
fatally shot a 15-year-old boy who
was throwing fire bombs at a
police bus.
At least 70 youths were taken in-
to custody, in what police said was
the worst violence Athens has seen
in years. Authorities said there
were scores of policemen and others
injured, but gave no numbers as

the unrest continued into the night.
THE DEATH of Michalis
Kaltezas enraged a mob of self-
proclaimed anarchists, who went
on rampage yesterday through
downtown Athens, breaking win-;
dows of banks and shops and
engaging police in hit-and-run bat-
tles.
Authorities said policemen in the
firebombed bus were not injured.
The youth died from a shot in the
head.

By DIANNE KNAUSS
With topics ranging from smoking
to student government, students
around campus have banded together
to express their views. But, instead of
rallies and public forums, these
students are using computers to
communicate.
Though computer conferencing has
been around for a few years, Univer-
sity students have usually shied away
from participating in the conferences
simply because their computer time
was allotted for course work.
SINCE SEPTEMBER, however,
the University has offered every
student $50 worth of computing time
per term on the University computer
system, MTS. Dubbed request ac-
counts, they have allowed the
establishment of an MTS computer
conference specifically for students.
The conference, called MEET:
STUDENTS, was started back in Sep-
tember by a group of students who
had shown interest in other MTS con-
ferences.
"(We) started talking about a con-
ference by, of, and for students," said
James Heaton one of the conference
organizers.
WHEN THE University obtained
another computer for MTS and
decided to let students have the
"free" computer time, the concept of
a student conference took shape.
MEET: STUDENTS currently has

Once you get in (MEET:STUDENTS),
it's really worth it. You can't stop - you
get addicted.
-James Heaton
Engineering junior

about 200 users, 120 of which are fairly
active, said Maya Bernstein, a
residential college senior and an
organizer of the conference.
Though those numbers may not
seem impressive, Bernstein said
MEET:STUDENTS is comparable to
other active conferences on MTS.
ON MEET:STUDENTS, users can
choose from over 100 "items," each of
which addresses a different topic.
Participants can view responses
from other users as well as adding
comments of their own.
Some of the items, like one called
Sex and Singles, a questionnaire
taken from Playboy, have created
more interest than others. The
questions didn't provoke debate, but
many of the responses did.
"A couple of people didn't show a

whole lot of decorum," Bernstein
said. "I was, perhaps, a little conser-
vative about it - worrying about what
people were saying. It got into a little
bit of a debate that digressed into Fir-
st Amendment rights."
SENIOR engineering major Paul
Anderson, who is active on
MEET:STUDENTS, said the con-
ference was a good way for him to in-
teract with other people, although
he'd like to see more diversity among
users.
"I'm disappointed by the lack of a
wide variety of people. It fails its ob-
jective of a wide spectrum of com-
munication...about 10 percent (of the
users) are not computer science and
engineering people," Anderson said.
A lot of the problem, Bernstein said,
is due to the fact that many people are

afraid of computers.
"The stigma that computers are
just for math and computer science
students is crap," Bernstein said.
"(Computers) can be used to build
bonds between people."
ANOTHER PROBLEM with getting
non-science majors involved, is that
to obtain a request account, a student
has to trek up to the North Campus
Computing Center.
"It's hard to get students up to Nor-
th Campus," said Jimi Lee Haswell,
an LSA junior, and participant on
MEET:STUDENTS. "They're trying
to experiment with getting (request
accounts) at CRISP."
Any student with a computer ac-
count on MTS can access the
MEET :STUDENTS conference.
Users must first log on to the UB
computer. In the past, there was only
one computer, known as UM.
But this summer, MTS added a
second computer, UB, where all the
student request accounts are held.
After signing on, a user must type
the command,
#Source MEET: STUDENTS
From there, the conference will
help you get started. Heaton en-
couraged other students to get in-
volved.
"It's scary to people with no
background in computers, but once
you get in there, it's really worth it.
You can't stop - you get addicted."

SOFTWARE EXCHANGE
S
This Week's Special
PORTABLE 3 "
"::. MICRO DISK CARRIERS. .Z"
THE EASEL $12.95 .
THE POCKET PAK $9.95
The safe and convenient way to carry your disks.
Software;Always 25%

6euwn4a rc4

SMn. -T
Stir

01. RS:
hurs. 10-6:30
ri. 10-9
at. 10-5
n. closed

.il .M N. II M ..

I

DON'T LET THE
'U'
FOOL YOU!
ABOUT IBM COMPUTER PRICES
THE'U' GSP
service $20 Free
fee$2
warranty 90 days 6 mos.
delivery you pick to your
it up door
delivery 3-5 wks. 1-3 wks.
time _____________
financing none available
purchases only 1 unlimited
per student
WE WILL BEAT ANY UM PRICE
ON COMPARABLE SYSTEMS

NEED TO PULL A
COMPUTING "ALL-NIGHTER"?
Computing Center's Public Stations
UNYN and NUBS Now Open 7 Days, 24 Hours!
(Terminal room in 1028 E. Engineering, too!)

WHEN:
NEW
EXTRA HOURS:
(Buildings & Machines)
SERVICES:
NEW
EXTRA HOURS:
(Consulting)

November 16 through December 15
11:30 p.m. Saturday -12 noon Sunday
11:30 p.m. Sunday - 8:00 a.m. Monday
UM and UB MTS Hosts Available
Input/Output windows Open.
Microcomputers and Terminals Available
Printers Available
7 p.m. - 11 p.m. Sunday UNYN ONLY!

" FREE Installation

" FREE Service and Counseling

gsp Graphic Software Products
617 E. University Suite 260
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48104
(313) 663-0088

QUESTIONS: Call the Computing Assistance Center
(CAC) 763-0583
Note: NUBS closed for cleaning weekdays only 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.

1

Il

nigh
University of Michigan
Medical Center
Invites You to Hear
Bertram Pitt, M.D.
William O'Neill, M.D.
Division of Cardiology
Department of Internal Medicine
U-M Medical Center
ATTACKING
HEART
DISEASE:
NEW ADVANCES
IN TREATMENT
Doctors Pitt and O'Neill ore
investigating the most
advanced techniques for
treating heart disease. They
will answer your questions and
discuss new methods in
attacking the number one cause
of death in the U.S.
Tuesday,
November 19, 1985
7:30 - 9:00 p.m.
Refreshments Follow
Ann Arbor Inn
Ballroom
Huron at Fourth Avenue
Free
No reservations
necessary
Health Night Out is a
continuing series of public
information programs in the
interest of your good health.
For more information, col
(313) 764-2220

Drn&jmMonrvl-I e l

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