100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 14, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 14, 1985 - Page 3

:." ." ....... "......"s.."..."......." ..a.."" . .. " .t*********.. . *.."...".....__.____ ........._. ...

Sudarkasa
k calls for
A spirit of
Td
tC

7

(Continued from Page 1)
Sudarkasa said.
Her report on recruitment that was
published last spring was never made
public. She commented that a lot was
lost by not making the report public.
"We made the impression that there
was something to hide, but there
really wasn't."
Her next report, on retention, will
not be out until at least December, she
said. It was expected out earlier.
ACCORDING TO Sudarkasa, the
report is overdue because "I did not
correctly assess what goes into a
retention report. Retention is more
difficult than recruitment because
one has to look at a variety of social

and academic issues," Sudarkasa
said.
Sudarkasa has recently sent out a
questionnaire to 3,000 students,
minorities and non-minorities. She
also expressed desire to form a group
of students who will help with the
publication of such a report. She said
she hopes the questions will provide
her with student input.
She and the Michigan Student
Assembly have encountered difficulty
in defining exactly what a student
task force, which Sudarkasa wants to
establish, will entail.
According to Sudarkasa, MSA wan-
ts a committee rather than a "task
force."

cooperation'

Wolfe parodies college athletics

By MATTHEW BENSON
Three Ann Arbor ministers yester-
day taped copies of a petition regar-
ding U.S. Policy in Central America,
signed by nearly 1,000 local residents,
to Congressman Carl Pursell's office
door.
The petition, which has been cir-
culating for about two weeks, asks
that an "Ordinance Establishing
Initiatives for Peace in Central
America" be put to a city-wide vote in
April. If passed, the ordinance would
require the city clerk to notify local
legislative representatives that the
citizen's of Ann Arbor oppose military
aid to Central America, and support
the right of self-determination for
those nations.
REVS. JIM LEWIS, Don Coleman,
and Nadean Bishop, who represent
the coalition for Peace in Central
America which organized the petition
drive, said they posted 95 pages of
signatures on Pursell's door as a
symbolic re-enactment of Martin
Luther posting his 95 theses for
reformation on a church door in 1517.
The group said the action was an ef-
fort to show Pursell (R-Ann Arbor) the
support they are receiving from other
Ann Arbor residents.
Pursell, however, was in
Washington yesterday, and two of his
staff members inside the office did not
come to the door when Lewis and
Bishop knocked.
"WE HAD no way of knowing what
might have resulted had we asked
them in," said Cindy Hutchins, an

Ministers tape petition to door

(Continued from Page 1)
down. I think things are funny. Some
things that others find very
depressing I laugh at."
Following his comic monologue,
Wolfe spoke about his upcoming
novel Bonfire of the Vanities. Bon-
fire is Wolfe's first novel.
OFTEN, HE put on a pair of white
glasses, saying that he was going to
read from the manuscript. He
never did, choosing instead to
describe several characters, ex-
plaining one scene with bravado.

assistant to Pursell. "We need to
maintain atcertain degree of decorum
in this office, and we've had difficult
experiences with demonstrators in
the past."
Coleman said that the coalition
originally was formed to educate
people about Central America. "We
came up with the ballot petition as an
active and effective way of doing

that."
"We thought of asking a city council
member to sponsor the resolution..."
Coleman said, "but we wanted to keep
the campaign on a human, grass-roots
level."
The group must gather almost 4,000
signatures by Jan. 6 to get the
proposal on the ballot.

As he was prepared to finally read
a scene, he announced that his time
was up and proceeded instead to a
question and answer session.
"I was using the threat as a prop,"
Wolfe said. "I was baiting the
audience. No one really wants to
hear a manuscript read. It's very
dry. '"
SUMMING UP the scene, Wolfe
said, "Hell hath no fury like a
husband whose wife cuts him off
from his true lust. And if she ac-

tually catches him, the anger
recedes and he drowns in a nearby
pond of sentimental guilt."
Speaking about the pitfalls he
discovered in writing a novel, he
said, "We don't live in a plausible
age. What if twenty years ago
someone wrote that small groups of
armed people could freeze the world
by taking over old people's cruises,
dusty embassies, or airplanes? He
would have been scoffed at."

DETROIT
41AK1 & TRAVEL SHOW
FRI. NOV 15-SUN., NOV 17
COBO HALL
FRI. (5-10 pmi SAT (Nx)-10 pm), SUN. (Nxx-6 pm)
MEET SUZY CHAFFEE AND SEE HUNDREDS OF SKI
& TRAVEL EXHIBITS, SHOWS AND BOOTHS, PLUS:
* FREESTYLE SPORTS SKI DECK SHOW, PRESENTED
BY DUNHAM'S SPORTS OUTFITTERS * FASHION
PREVIEW '86, PRESENTED BY THE BAVARIAN
VILLAGE SKI SHOPS * SKI WORKSHOP DEMOS *
VACATION PLANNING CENTER * WARREN MILLER
SKI FILMS * AND MUCH, MUCH MORE
WIN A FREE SKI VACATION TO VAIL COURTESY OF

HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Yehuda Amichai, Israel's leading poet, will be giving a poetry reading
(in English) on campus tonight. Amichai is the author of a number of
books of poetry and prose. He will read at Hillel, 1429 Hill St., at 8 p.m.
Admission is $2.00.
Films
Alternative Action - Putney Swope, 7:30 & 9:15 p.m., MLB 4.
Cinema Guild - Citizen Kane, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Cinema II - Blackmail, 7 p.m.; Destiny, 8:30 p.m., Natural Science
Bldg.
Ethnographic Film Series - Les Maitres Fous; Trobriend Cricket. 7
p.m., Lec. room 2, MLB.
Eyemediae - The World of Buckminster Fuller, 8 p.m., Kerrytown
Concert House.
Hill St. Cinema - Simon, 7 & 9 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Major Events - The Roches, 8 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Michigan Theater Foundation - The French Lieutenant's Woman, 7 &
9:15 p.m., Michigan Theater.
The Video Yearbook - Showing of last year's video, 10 a.m., ground
floor, Union.
Performances
Major Events - Concert, Michael W. Smith and Kathy Troccoli, Hill
Auditorium.
School of Music - Craig Solvie, trumpet recital, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Speakers
ARK - Nancy Vogl, 8p.m., 637 S. Main St.
Ann Arbor Libertarian League - Bette Erwin, "Political Preference
and Psychodynamics," 7p.m., room C, League.
Biology - Erich Staedler, "Chemoreception in Some Phytophagous In-
sects," 9a.m., 1053 Natural Science Bldg.
Biostatistics - Victor G. DeGruttola, "Multivariate Linear Models for
Longitudinal Data: Resistant Methods and Influence Analysis," 3:30
p.m., M4332 SPH II.
CRLT - Robert B. Kozma, Using Computer Simulations in the
Classroom, 4:30 p.mm, room 2219, SEB.
Chemistry - Yael Barshad, "Electron Diffraction Study of Super-
sonically Generated Clusters," 4 p.m., 1200 Chemistry.
Engineering - Joel Levine, "Methane and Carbon Monoxide in the
Troposphere, 1950 & 1985: Some Photochemical Considerations," 4 p.m.,
2231 Space Res.; M.B. Pursley, "Frequency-Hop Packet Radio Net-
works," 4 p.m., 2031 East Engineering Bldg.
Finance Club - J. Bistsch, Paine Webber, "Corporate Internships," 4
p.m., Wolverine Room.
Japanese Studies - Brown bag lecture, "Working in Japan: Student
Experiences," noon, Commons room, Lane Hall.
Linguistics - Steven Dworkin, "On the Frontier of Diachronic
Phonology and Diachronic Morphology," noon, 3050 Frieze.
Marketing Club - P. Douglas, Quaker Oats, "Brand Management," 4
p.m., Michigan Room.
Medical Chemistry - Eddy Esmans, 4 p.m., 3554 C.C. Little Bldg.
Mus. Anthropology - Jeffrey R. Parsons, "Regional Archaeology in
Iceland: Implications of the 1985 Eyjafjordur Survey," noon, room 2009,
Music School.
Ophthy/Psychology/Physiology/Bioengineering - George Siegel,
"ATPase in Retina and Brain," 12:15,2055 MHRI.
Residential College - Peter Witteveen, "Glimpses Outside Tokyo:
Teaching in Rural Japan 1984-85," 7:30 p.m., room 126, East Quad.
Russian and Eastern European Studies - Richard Clogg, "Contem-
porary Greek Politics," 4 p.m., room 200, Lane Hall.
University Alcoholics Anonymous - noon, room 3200, Union.
Western European Studies - A. Richard Turner, "Poetry and Power in
Italian Renaissance Landscape," 8p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
Meetings
College Democrats of America -7 p.m., Pond rooms, Union.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship - Why Christianity? 7 p.m., Hen-
derson room, League.
Regents -1 p.m., Regents' room, Fleming.
University Council - 4 p.m., room 3909, Union.
Miscellaneous
Computing Center - Workshop, Laura Bollettino and Richard Conto,
"Microcomputer Communications with Kermit," 3 p.m., 1013 NUBS.
Department of Romance Languages - Workshop, History of Rhetoric,
8 p.m., W. Lecture room, Rackham.
HRD - Workshops, Managing Change, 9 a.m.; Job Search, 7 a.m.
Hillel -Poetry reading, Yehuda Amichai, 8 p.m., Hillel, 1429 Hill St.
Hillel Foundation - Poetry reading, Yehuda Amichai, 8 p.m., Hillel.
His House Christian Fellowship -Bible study, 7:30 p.m., 925 E. Ann St.

Michigan League - International Night, India 5 p.m., cafeteria.
Office of Admin. Sys. - Workshop, Introduction to Wang Glossary, 1
n M

0 CONTINENTAL AIRLNES

&ThMark

MSA may
reduce funds
if new group
is formed
(Continued from Page 1)
The assembly defines constituent
contact as sending out mailings to
constituents, sponsoring discussions
with students, and forming liasons
with individual school or college
governments.
MSA is also planning two ballot
questions that will ask students
whether they approve of the Board of
Regents imposition of a mandatory
fee for students to fund the Univer-
sity's computer expansion.
THE REGENTS in September
voted to charge all students $50 next
term and 100 each term thereafter to
nearly triple the number of computers
around campus. But MSA members
Steve Heyman thinks the decision was
made without sufficient student input.
Heyman, who chairs MSA's
Legislative Relations Committee,
said the University rushed the fee to
the regents, forcing "students to pay
the price for the University's poor
planning."
"Because the Administration con-
trols the information at this Univer-
sity we're at their mercy when they
want our input," Heyman said.
ALTHOUGH HE is not opposed to
the concept of a computer fee,
Heyman said he will attempt to per-
suade the regents to postpone next
term's fee if enough students vote for
more input in University computer
decisions.
Douglas Van Houweling, the
University's Vice-Provost for infor-
mation technology and the man who
presented the computer fee plan to the
regents, said yesterday the Univer-
sity's Executive Officers will "pay
close attention to what the students
tell us, but that doesn't necessarily
mean that we'll do what they want."
Van Houweling acknowledged that
the process was hurried, but he said
that waiting any longer to approve the
computer fee would have dealt a
-serious blow to the University's
technological capability.
He pointed to the Computer Policy
Committee, a student committee that
will be formed within the next several
weeks as an example of student input
into University computer policy.
"I've been interested in student in-
put from the very beginning, and for-
ming this committee is the best way to
do this," Van Houweling said.
Correction
The student pictures on page 3 of the
Daily yesterday was LSA sophomore
Julie Raden, a member of the cast
the campus production of Evita. A
cutline in yesterday's Daily incorrec-
tly identified Raden.

$1 DISCOUNT OFF REGULAR ADMISSION WITH THIS AD
Nol \,ltd in ( nniunction with <an other oTer.

Citicorp In vestment Bank
is pleased to invite seniors and
graduate students to attend a presentation
outilning our exciting career opportunities
in SALES and TRADING, PUBLIC
FINANCE and CORPORATE FINANCE.
Backed by the resources of Citicorp, the largest global
financial service organization in the world, we have at our disposal
the largest capital base of any investment bank, plus
the most sophisticated technological network in existence.
We are:
" The Largest Foreign Exchange Dealer
* The Only Truly Global Investment Bank
" The #1 Bank in the Commodities Market
" The Industry Leader in the Swaps Market
" One of the Top 3 primary dealers in U. S. Government Securities
Please join us to learn more about these job opportunities.
DATE: November 19, 1985 TIME: 4-6 p.m.
LOCATION: Hale Auditorium
SPEAKER: J. Michael Payte, Vice President,
North American Investment Bank
TOPIC: Swaps and the International Capital Markets
CITICORP@ IN VESTMENT BANI(

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan