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November 08, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HAPPENINGS-
Friday
Highlight
Cultural anthropologist Clifford Geertz will deliver the 1985 Tanner
Lecture on Human Values on "The Uses of Diversity" at 4 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheater. Geertz, the Harold F. Linder Professor of Social
Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., will
discuss the justification of political and ethical claims across cultural
boundaries. The event is free and open to the public.
Films
See WEEKEND magazine
Performances
See WEEKEND magazine
Speakers
South & Southeastern Asia Studies - Karl Hutterer, "Travels Through
Sip Song Banna: A Southeast Asianist in China," noon, Lane Hall Com-
mons room.
Meetings
Student Legal Services - 3:30 p.m., Union.
Breast Cancer Education/Support group - noon, Simpson Memorial
Institute Library.
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - 7:30 p.m., Packard Road
Baptist Church.
r Korean Christian Fellowship -9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
Cornerstone Christian Fellowship - 7 p.m., Third floor, Rm. C,
League.
Juggling Club -3 p.m., Union.
Miscellaneous
« MHRI - Seminar, Neal Birnberg, "CIS & Trans Activism of Opioid
Peptide Gene Expression," 3:45 p.m., 1057 MHRI.
Guild House Campus Ministry - Forum, Lemuel Johnson, "Blacks,
Nuclear War & the U-M," noon, 802 Monroe St.
Microcomputer Education Center - Workshops: Intro to Microcom-
puters, 1 t0 3 p.m., Rm. 3113; Basic Concepts of Microcomputer
Telecommunications - Using Window with Your IBM-Compatible
Microcomputer, Pt. I, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Microsoft Multiplan for
IBM-Compatible Microcomputers; Microsoft Word for the MacIntosh,
Pt. Ia, 1-5 p.m.; Microsoft Word for the Macintosh, Pt. Ib, 3-5 p.m., Rm.
3001, School of Education building.
Economics - Seminar, Paul Sweeny, "The Growth of the Financial
Sector & Its Implications for the World Economy," noon to 2 p.m., Angell
Aud. D.
Gay Liberation - Coffee house, 8 to 11p.m., 802 Monroe St.
Minority Women's Task Force - Workshop, Personal Financial Plan-
ning, 4 p.m., Rm. S6330, University Hospital.
' Academic Women's Caucus - Discussion, "What is the Climate for
Academic Women at the University?" noon, 350 S. Thayer St.
International Folk Dance Club - Lessons, 8:30 p.m., Angell School,
1208 S. University St.
Aerospace Engineering - Seminar, Thomas Ver Schure, "The F-15,
Past, Present, and Future," 3:30 to 5 p.m., 107 Aerospace Engineering
building.
Nuclear Engineering - Colloquium, John Kelly, "Research on Severe
Accidents on Light Water Reactors," 3:45 p.m., White Aud., Cooley
Building.
Engineering - Seminar, C.W. Lee, "Weighted Minimum Variance
Control of Servo-Damper System with Input Energy Constraint," 4
p.m., 1018 Dow Building.
Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations - Conference, "Par-
ticipation and the Changing Role of Unions," 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., North
Campus Commons.
Canterbury House - Open house for Episcopal students, 4 to 6 p.m., 218
N. Division St.
Saturday
Highlight
A symposium on the Tanner Lecture, "The Uses of Diversity," will
take place at 9:30 a.m. in the Rackham Amphitheatre. The symposium
will feature Clifford Geertz, The Institute of Advanced Study; Steven
Lukes, Balliol College, Oxford University; Richard Rorty, University of
Virginia; Dan Sperber, University of Paris.
Films
See WEEKEND magazine
Performances

See WEEKEND magazine
Meetings
Ann Arbor Go Club - 2 to 7 p.m., 1433 Mason Hall.
Miscellaneous
Armenian Students' Cultural Association - Dance, 8 p.m., St. Nicholas
Greek Orthodox Church, 414 N. Main St.
Friends Meetinghouse-Salvadoran Dinner and Program, 6:30p.m.
1420 Hill St.
Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations - Conference, "Par-
ticipation and the Changing Role of Unions," 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., North
Campus Commons.
Sunday
Highlight
The School of Art is presenting a symposium on European Expressionism
at 3 p.m. in Auditorium A of Angell Hall.
Films
See WEEKEND magazine.
Performances
See WEEKEND magazine
Meetings
Alnha Phi Omega -7 n.m.. Union.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 8, 1985 - Page 3

Student resigns from

1

University
By KERY MURAKAMI
Eric Schnaufer, an outspoken op-
ponent of a code of non-academic con-
duct and one of three students on the
University Council, resigned from the
council yesterday, saying he didn't
want to jeopardize the credibility of
the body.
Ben Cooper, an LSA senior, was
named by the Michigan Student
Assembly to take Schnaufer's place.
"I RESIGNED in part to take away
one of the administration's excuses
for ignoring the University Council
and student views represented by the
council," he said.
Schnaufer, a law student, said
members of the University's admin-
istration had expressed concern of
having a "biased" student on the
council. He said he didn't want to give
University President Harold Shapiro
ammunition which could be used to
supersede the council in January.
Shapiro last month told students in-
volved in the code issue that he would
bypass the council and submit last
year's code proposal to the regents for
Ships inch
their zway
through
canal
(Continued from Page 1)
The Furia, which was in the lock
when the wall collapsed, was the first
into the 80-foot-by-730-foot lock, and
with a blast of its horn and an engine
surge it headed toward Lake Ontario
bound for Egypt.
OTHERS, including the Prairie
Harvest, Quebecois, and Rebecca
Oma, were expected to make it
through the canal yesterday, Darcy
said.
Ship owners expressed relief about
the reopening, but continued to worry
about how long the weather would
allow the seaway to remain open past
its normal mid-December closing
date.
Pat Doherty, vice president and
manager of N.M. Patterson and Sons
in Thunder Bay, Ontario, said that
even with favorable weather, his
shipping company would not be able
to recoup all its losses.
Last year, after a lift bridge at
Valleyfield, Quebec, failed and
clogged traffic for 18 days, the seaway
was able to extend its season into the
first week of January, but ship owners
still incurred an estimated $8 million
in losses, according to industry
figures.
Correction
A caption in yesterday's Daily iden-
tified see-sawers trying to raise funds
for children's cancer research as
members of the Chi Phi fraternity.
They're from the Chi Psi fraternity.

Council
approval unless the council recon-
sidered the administration's proposal
or finished its own draft by the end of
the year.
THE COUNCIL has not recon-
sidered last year's code proposal and
is not expected to complete its work
this year.
Schnaufer, who was actively in-
volved in "No Code" protests last
year, said he feared regents may ap-
prove-the administration's proposal,
thinking the council did not finish its
work because of stalling by
Schnaufer.
Suzanne Cohen, a law student and
co-chair of the council, said she didn't
expect any changes in the students'
stance after Schnaufer's departure.
Cooper's views on the code are
similar to those of the two other
students on the council and the one
advocated by Schnaufer this year.
They say the University should have
jurisdiction over non-academic offen-
ses only when civil laws do not
adequately deal with problems.

RAYMOND E. SULLIVAN
Fellowships in
Natural Resources

for graduate study in
Forest Resource Management
Resource Ecology
Water and Air Resources
Resource Economics and Policy
Yearly stipends up to $7,000, plus research assistantships,
available for Ph.D. candidates
Stipends ranging from $1,000 to $4,000, plus assistantships,
available for study leading to Master of Forestry, Master of
Environmental Management, or Master of Science degrees
Write or call for information and applications
Director of Admissions and Financial Aid, School of Forestry
and Environmental Studies, Duke University, Durham,
North Carolina 27706, (919) 684-2135
Or talk with a representative on your campus

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