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November 07, 1985 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ARTS
Thursday, November 7, 1985
Genus XI7~ ?ditiowick up where '~"
the Genus EditiOn y~~ghed o~X.
j-j ~ NXu5iC~ NXu5iC ~ /

The Michigan Daily

Page 7

Basement bands hit Ass
San Pedro spiritual brethren. Not to obscurity of the late '60s and the in-

By Hobey Echlin
INWHAT promises to be one of the
INgreatest rock 'n' roll new music
shows of our time, Sleep, Private
Angst, and Crossed Wire make an un-
precedented Ann Arbor appearance
at East Quad's Halfway Inn this
Friday night.
Crossed Wire will open with an ex-
panded repertoire, following the final
mix of their new album Fall Through
Morning. Featuring Chris Moore on
vocals and lead guitar, Rob Mc-
Cullough on rhythm guitar, Rob Mc-
Cullough on rhythm guitar, Kurt
Marshky on bass, and Bud Burcar on
drums, Crossed Wire draws on the
spirit of the Damned and their own
musical background to produce an
upbeat approach to music that com-

bines the best elements of guitar-
oriented rock and straight-forward
rock in an all-around powerful ap-
proach to original music.
Vocalist Moore's songwriting
ability, and the band's ability to pick
up on Moore's guitar lines, whether
it's Marchke's ecstatic bass line on
"Sound Salvation," or Burcar 's
machine-gun drumming on "Climb,"
is as refreshing as it is altogether
strong. Truly a band of musicians, as
creative as they are fun, Crossed
Wire's Ann Arbor debut is not to be
missed.
Following Crossed Wire will be
Private Angst, Detroit veterans with
an ear for the diverse. Labelled by
many as the Detroit version of the
Minutemen, those who know better
recall that Private Angst has been
playing better music longer than their

get too judgemental, but Private
Angst's "Egoland"~ single, with its
hellacious bassline and four-speed
shifting tempos, was out long before
the Minutemen had the chord shifts to
"Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love" down.
Besides playing numerous gigs in
the Detroit hardcore scene, they have
also played the Blind Pig and plenty
of Wayne State University lunchtime
shows as well. Greg Gordon's
multifarious approach to music of all
kinds is alone worth the price of ad-
mission.
But wait, there's more, as
Sleep-longtime veterans of the
Detriot scene who are now gaining a
broad audience - combinee all the

novativeness of the 'OS into an
amalgamation of fervent rock 'n' roll,
Sleep features the phenomenal Chris
Girard, (Matthew Smith of It's Rainig
calls him "The greatest guitarist in
the world"). "In the beginig, rock
and roll was a real physical and
human thing, with real pounding
drums, etc., no synth stuff, and we
like to think of ourselves as con-
tinuing that history," said Girard in
an interview in last week's Weekend.
Detroit's three best bands, rising
from underground obscurity, hit the
college scene full force, as Crossed
Wire, Private Angst, and Sleep play
the Halfway Friday night, and all for
only three bucks.

Featuring:

'Ubu Roi' runs tonight through Sunday at the New Trueblood Theatre;
shows begin at 8 p.m. Tickets are $5, $3 for students and are available
through the Michigan League Box Office.
~ Ubu' to slash and burn

RPrmdise
JAZZ CLUB
The Bird of Paradise
A nn A rbor's Only Jazz Club
Located at 207 South Ashley
662-8310

LIVE JAZZ
ENTERTAINMENT
WJe're not just a nightclub. Come join
us May-Friday, 5 P.M. -8 P.M. for
* After work Snacks
A LSO
Wed.-Friday & Football Saturdays
Live Music 5:30 P.M. - 7:30 P.M.

By Seth Flicker.
KATHER UBU is vulgar, power-
I'hungry, and above all absurd.
The central figure in Alfred Jarry's
Ubu Roi - a University Players
production which opens tonight - is
all too human.
"The play is about all time, all
agreed, all power, and all lust," said
Barry Goldman, director of the
:production. "It is very human."
Father Ubu is an obese, selfish, and
greedy mari who allows his wife to
convince him that he should take over
TPoland. With his mind clouded by
_visions of power, Ubu begins to mur-
der enemies and friends alike. Ubu's
bloody, self-serving rampage is
challenged only when he comes face.
Ao face with the rightful heir to the
'throne.
"The story is simple," said Gold-
man, "but the story only serves as a
vehicle of interpretation. The audien-
cshould ask who these charac-
ters are, where they are, and how
*they got there."
Jarry uses Ubu, who curses without
restraint and eats in a slovenly man-
* rr throughout the play, to caricature
,paltry men with lofty, self-centered
ideals.
"The play is vulgar but enter-
taining," said Goldman. "The play
[sbould shake up the audience."
Whether they love the play or deeply
dislike it, the audience will definitely
feel something, added Goldman.
The play is explosive art, he said.
The movement of the characters is
,between animation-like and ex-
*pressionistic, but very much like what
you'd expect to see in puppet theatre.
.Kind of like Punch and Judy..
7" The stage is an arena for
amusement and murder," he said.
Ubu Roi is one of several plays
that Jarry wrote using Father Ubu as
the central character.
"(Alfred Jarry) was an incredibly
strange but knowledgeable man,"
.Goldman said of the playwright. "He
was a prolific short story, poetry, and
song writer until his death in the early
1900s ...He's very much like Kurt
,Vonnegut -~ dry, witty, and pointed."
Goldman, an actor, director, and

teacher of theatre, studied mime in
Paris and was an active member of
the Children's Theatre Company of
Minneapolis.

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