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November 04, 1985 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-11-04

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 4, 1985-- Page 7
A ONCE AND FUTURE HERO?

Heren
By BRAD MORGAN
For Dieter Heren, special teams isn't
just a job, it's an adventure.
Heren made a name for himself
earlier in the season when he blocked
a punt against Michigan State that Ed
Hood recovered for a touchdown.
Against Illinois on Saturday, Heren
became an even bigger hero.
WITH THE Fighting Illini's Chris
White lined up to attempt a game-
winning field goal that would put an
end to Michigan's Rose Bowl hopes,
Heren pulled off what could be called
the Miracle at Memorial (Stadium).
The ball was snapped, White's kick
was a little low, and the 6-3 Heren
leaped high enough to get the smallest
piece of his left ring finger on the ball.
Instead of going low and accurate,
the ball shot into the air, got caught by
the strong breeze that blew
throughout the game and wobbled
towards the uprights. Seeming to
hover forever, the ball finally came
down squarely on the crossbar and
dropped in the endzone. For Illinois,
the Rose Bowl was fading; for
Michigan, it was still a dream.
"I WASN'T sure if it was going to go
over or under, and then it hits," said
an excited Heren after the game.
"I said a little prayer just asking for
a chance to get a piece of the ball, and
tI got just enough of it."
Heren almost proved to be an even
bigger hero when it was revealed af-
ter the game that he had also tipped

e flects,

refl ects

I said a little
prayer just asking
for a chance to get
a piece of the ball,
and I just got enough
of it.'
-Dieter Heren

.

the ball when White barely made a 36-.
yarder in the third quarter, that
provided Illinois with its only points.
THE SENIOR out of Fort Wayne,
Indiana was quick to credit the
coaching staff for his success.
"The coaches have put me in the
right position," he said. "Sometimes
my job is to create a scene, but this
time it was to be the scene."
Heren has seen playing time at
linebacker after starting the season
as a defensive back, but his main role
is still on special teams.
"WE TAKE pride in our special
teams. Usually people look at a team
as offense and defense, but we see it

as offense, defense and special
teams," explained Heren.
Linebacker Andy Moeller, Heren's
teammate on special teams, agreed
with that assessment.
"We were just trying to get up and
get it blocked," Moeller said. "We
always-tell each other that we've just
got tokeep believing becausewwe've
been there so many times with the
other team driving against us at the
end of the game."
"I just flashed back to the Iowa
game, and that was scary, losing in
the final two seconds," Heren added.
"We just didn't want that to happen
again."

Daily Photo by DAN HABIB

Wolverine senior defensive tackle Mike Hammerstein breaks through Illinois' frontline and nails quarterback
Jack Trudeau during Saturday's 3-3 tie. Michigan's defense held Trudeau to five yards rushing.

I

A

What's
Happening

WOMEN FINISH THIRD; MEN, FIFTH:

Blue hi
By RACHEL GOLDMAN
This Saturday morning as the rain
covered the University golf course,
runners from throughout the midwest
prepared for the Big Ten Cross-
.0country championships.
In the women's race, first place was
expected to be a battle between
Michigan's Sue Schroeder and
Wisconsin's Katie Ismael. At the one-
mile mark, Schroeder made her
break and pulled into the fourth
position. As the race continued,
Schroeder grabbed third, which she
later lost, at about the 3.1 mile mark.
But by the end of the race, Schroeder
had yielded a couple more spots.
Her sixth-place finish was a disap-
GRIDDE PICKS
Ask Tim Berry. He'll tell you. He
knows the prizes he won as this week's
Griddes winner. He'll explain his
-decision of either a full-tray Sicilian
pizza, or Chicago stuffed pizza, or
whole sub sandwich from Pizza Ex-
press. He'll tell of the fun he will have
with his Dooley's pass, good for two.
Just ask him.
41. Purdue at MICHIGAN
"" (pick total points)
2. Illinois at Iowa
3. Michigan State at Indiana
4. Wisconsin at Minnesota
5. Ohio State at Northwestern
6. Georgia at Florida
. Miami (Fla.) at Maryland
8. Army at Air Force
9. Mississippi at Notre Dame
10. South Carolina at Florida State
11. Baylor at Arkansas
12. UCLA at Arizona
313. Alabama at LSU
14. Washington at Arizona State
15. Colorado at Kansas
16. Syracuse at Navy
17. Clemson at North Carolina
18. Drake at Tulsa
19. Iowa State (+50) at Nebraska
20. Purdon't at DAILY LIBELS

arriers place
pointment mostly to herself, because mark. But after 7000n
as a whole, the women's team finished had overtaken Brew
well. Tying for third with Indiana and Brewster third by the e
Illinois, the women would've placed following Wisconsin's
second had the sixth runner been and Stintzi.
counted in the scoring. Coach Sue
Parks was pleased with her team's ORIENT SPEC
performance. "They gave a good ef-TOKYO
fort. We really couldn't expect much DETROIT to TOUL
more." TAPE
The race conditions were not im- TAIPE
proved by 11:00 a.m. when the men's HONG KONG
8000-meterrace began. The tem- Call Toll Free 1-800-
perature was pleasant, but the wet
grass made the course very slow.
Chris Brewster, Michigan's first
place hopeful, battled with Joe Stintzi, USE DAILY CLA
Wisconsin's number two, taking the
second spot at the five kilometer

met
vste
nd
T

in Big Ten
ters, Stintzi With a fifth-place overall finish
er, leaving behind Wisconsin, Purdue, North-
of the race, western, and Ohio State, the men did
im Hacker not qualify for the NCAA champion-
ships this year.

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.rFoods high in fats, salt- or
nitrite-cured foods like ham, and

WHAT ARE
WEEKENDS MADE OF?
- (
AND READING THE WEEKEND MAGAZINE

Pick Up

a Copy!

THr1
Rep+

oon
EATRE
co

There is evidence that diet
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Foods related to lower-
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broccoli, spinach, all dark
green leafy vegetables, sweet
potatoes, carrots, pumpkin, f
winter squash and tomatoes,
citrus fruits and brussels

fish and
types of sausages smoked by tradi-
tional methods should be
eaten in moderation.
.:.Be moderate in
- consumption of alco-
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A good rule of
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Weight reduction may
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Now, more than ever, we

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I IIIIIM

I

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