100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1985 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Shapiro meets
on aid for black
S. Africans

The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 1, 1985 - Page 5
'U' publishes AIDS
pamphlet for campus

(Continued from Page 1)
blacks at South African universities.
Shapiro was unavailable for com-
ment.
None of the other American officials
attending the meeting committed
their schools or foundations to any
specific actions. But the gathering in-
dicated apparent growing support for
providing scholarship funds for South
African blacks.
The idea could provide an attractive
means for colleges that have resisted
selling their South African-related
stockholdings to nonetheless take a
strong stand against apartheid.
More than 60 schools have divested
themselves of some or all of such
holdings, but that is just a small frac-
tion of the more than 3,000 U.S.
colleges and universities.
THE UNIVERSITY last month
divested $4.5 million in stocks in com-
panies that do business in South
Africa, bringing its total divestment
to 99 percent of $50 million in invest-
ments it held in 1983.
Harvard University, which holds
the most South Africa-related invest-
ments among all U.S. universities,
announced in September that it is

format at a $1 million fund to
help send black South
Africans to the school. Harvard has
$400 million in South Africa-related
investments.
Jane Sherwin, Harvard's secretary
to the advisory committee on
shareholder responsibility, said the
school felt the fund is a more effective
way to help South African blacks than
divestment.
HARVARD President Derek Bok
was among those who attended the
meetings.
Another administrator at the con-
ference was Frank Rhodes, president
of Cornell University, which holds
$147 million in South Africa-related
investments. Fifty-four students were
arrested at Cornell earlier this month
in protests against the school's in-
vestments.
Rhodes was unavailable for com-
ment, but a spokesperson said his
university spends about $60,000 a year
to send five black South African
students through the school. She
denied the scholarships are a sub-
stitute for divestment, but said they
were a means to take a stand against
apartheid.

By VIBEKE LAROI
In response to increasing campus
concern about AIDS, University
Health Service this week published an
education pamphlet titled "What
Everyone Should Know" about the
disease.
The pamphlet can currently be
picked up at Health Service and
should be available in residence
Halls, University Counseling Ser-
vices, and the Office of Human
Sexuality sometime next week, said
Caesar Briefer, Health Service direc-
tor.
THE UNIVERSITY issued the
pamphlet because of "conern on the
part of the administration that we
needed to give some information to

Briefer added he feels there
great deal of misinformation
hysteria concerning AIDS in
University community.

students, faculty, and staff explaining
the real facts of AIDS," he said.

is a
and
the

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syn-
drome breaks down the body's im-
mune system, leaving it vulnerable to
unusual infections and illnesses, the
pamphlet states.
The pamphlet also emphasizes that
AIDS is not spread by casual contact
and that the appearance of symptoms
similar to those described in the pam-
phlet does not mean that one has the
disease.

MONDAY-THURSDAY TUESDAY
8 p.m. to 10 p.m. 10 p.m. to C
Pitchers of Budweiser $2.75 Iced Tea
Iced Tea $2.75 WEDNESDA
MONDAY 10 P.M. to' C1
5 p.m. to Midnight World Famo
Half Off whole or half pans of Any pitcher.
pizza! No takeouts please.
10 Ptm. to Close
SDraftsipasto

lose
$2.
AY
lose
us Pitcher Night!
just $3.75!

75

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY
Pumpkin power
Three entries in a jack-o-lantern beauty contest lie in the lobby at Univer-
sity Towers on South Forest yesterday. The winning pumpkin will earn its
carver a Peugot bicycle.

Steiner advocates 'Preferred Admissions'

(Continued from Page 1)
said. "It's a method of trying to en-
courage undergraduates to take a
broader curriculum."
Preferred Admissions is different
from programs such as Inteflex, a
joint venture between LSA and the
medical school, because the un-
dergraduate and graduate programs
would not be comined and students
would not graduate' in a shorter
amount of time.
Preferred Admissions still has to be
formally accepted by the graduate
schools before it is implemented, but
Steiner said he has received positive

feedback from several schools. "I've
gotten very enthusiastic reactions
from business, from engineering,
from pharmacy," he said.
JUDY GOODMAN, director of ad-
missions at the business school, said
that details still have to be worked
out, but added, "I don't think it will
have a negative impact on us. If
anything, it will be positive for us."
Terrance Sandalow, dean of the
Law School, said it's too early to judge
whether Preferred Admissions will be
accepted at the Law School. Steiner is
scheduled to make a pitch to the
school's faculty today. "The program

has not been adopted here. It's just
under consideration," Sandalow said.
"We would expect if we did it that it
would not involve a great impact on
the Law School at all," he added.
THE PROGRAM, which Steiner
said will eventually admit up to 150
students a year, is expected to make
the University more attractive to
potential applicants, especially those
who might otherwise go to schools
such as Harvard. "This is a very good
recruiting tool," Steiner said.
In addition, Steiner said, students
who are admitted to the program will
have the advantage of being able to

seek advice from counselors in the
professional schools they hope to at-
tend.
Steiner said many students believe
that graduate school admissions of-
ficers expect applicants to have taken
courses that directly relate to their.
field, but graduate school ad-
ministrators say, "We want more
broadly educated people."
"There is a great over-emphasis on
pre-professional programs by the
students that just isn't there on the
part of graduate schools," Steiner
said.

Come and meet representatives from accredited graduate
schools throughout the United States at the GRE/CGS
Forum on Graduate Education in your area.
.CHICAGO
Saturday, November 2, 1985
Palmer House & Towers
State and Monroe Streets
9:00 am - 4:00 pm

WORKSHOPS
9:00am-10:00am
11:00 am -12:00 pm
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
2:30pm- 3:30pm

PRE-FORUM Workshop on Admissions and
Financial Aid
Graduate Study in Computer Science, Engi-
neering, and Mathematics, and -
Graduate Study in Biological, Health. and
Physical Sciences
GRE General Test and Subject Test
Preparation
Graduate Study in Economics, Psychology,
and other Social Sciences, and -
Graduate Study in Education and
Humanities

* Shultz expresses U.S. optimism for summit

WASHINGTON (UPI) - Secretary
of State George Shultz said yesterday
the United States is hoping for a whole
range of accords to come from the
Geneva summit, ranging from
greatly expanded cultural exchanges
to arms control agreements.
Shultz told a news conference that
intensive preparations have been un-
der way on these topics since he first

met Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnaze in Helsinki three months
ago.
Reiterating a principle American
topic for discussion at next month's
summit meeting of President Reagan
and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev,
Shultz said, "We want countries to
stop expanding their influence by the
use of armed intervention and subver-

sion.
Shultz, who leaves Saturday for a
pre-summit meeting in4 Moscow with
Shevardnadze and Gorbachev, said
that in addition to discussing how to
stop regional conflicts, the United
States wants to have "a more con-
structive relationship" with the Soviet
Union.
The United States, he said, hopes

that the Reagan-Gorbachev meeting
Nov. 19-20 in Geneva, Switzerland,
will mark "a hopeful new phase" in
superpower relations.

REGISTRATION begins at 8:30 am. FEE $3 payable at the door
GRADUATE SCHOOL EXHIBITS WILL BE OPEN FROM 10:00 am - 4:00 pm.

IT'S ALL OVER
CAMPUS!

DAIL)

/
.
ff
J'
: 7
, ..'
._--
I_

4
00-

Y! (
.
,4

'

GE' T
6~j

' L.r!

IT
.17_ ,

1'' "
' i

'ILI

4>

r_

j

Cx

K

'I

J

I

4

r

Y

J_
I.

.~J,: ~*%
1uwn'~
.1
>11
/
V1A
'Vt ~)
~'~- .1
~ / I'
~ zp~

i1~
4~' ;*,
/
A~ r!
f

J

President and Mrs. Shapiro
cordially invite all students to an
Open House
in their home at 815 S. University

m

I

IN g

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan