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October 25, 1985 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-25
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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r

s100 EVERY TUESDAY ALL SEATS

+i
1

MONOAY THR IFRIDAY j
SHOWS STARTING BEFORE6 00PM
SAT UNTIL 130 PM SUN FIRST SHOW ONLY

10:05,12:10, 2:30, 4:40,7:10, 9:40
FOLLOW THAT BIRD (G)
12:15 Daily
JOSHUA - THEN AND NOW - (R)
10:05,12:10,2:30,440,710,940
COCOON (P6.13)
10:05,1 00,4:10,7:00,9:40
PLENTY (R)
10:051 00,410,7:0 .9:40
MARIE (PG-13)
10:00,12:15,2:30,445,7:15,9:30
BLACK CAULDRON (PG)
10:00,12:15,230,4:45
ST. ELMO'S FIRE (R)
715,9:30
GODS MUST BE CRAZY (PG)
10:00.2:30.4:457:15.9:30

(Continued from Page I),
creator when he discovers that he is
to be replaced by a female prototype.
Mich, 7:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. $3.00,
$2.50/students, seniors.
Sweet Smell of Success (Alexander
Mackendrick, 1957) AAFC
Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis
star as a big city gossip columnist
and a small time press agent feeding
off Broadway and its glitter. Nat Sci,
9:00 p.m. $2.00/single, $3.00/double.
Contempt (Jean-Luc Godard, 1964)
AAFC
An unhappy marriage is a
metaphor for the instability of con-
temporary society. With Brigit Bar-
dot. French, with subtitles. Nat Sci,
7:00 p.m. $2.00/single, $3.00/double.
WEDNESDAY

mer, Bill Murray anADan Akroyd are
together again, this time as part of a
team of ghostbusters that snuff out the
ghosts tormenting their city. Also
stars Harold Ramis, who wrote the
screenplay with Akroyd. Lots of fun
and little else. Mich, 7:00 p.m. and
9:00 p.m. $3.00, $2.50/ students,
seniors.
THURSDAY

Few won

choose technical

en s
profess

COMMANDO (R)
12:00 230.4:30,7 00,9: 45, Fri.-Sat 11:30 p.m.
REMO WILLIAMS (R)
12:00, 2:15, 4:30,7:00, 9:30
SILVER BULLET (R)
1200,230,430,7:00,9:45, Fri.-Sat. 11:30Opm.
SWEET DREAMS (R)
12:00,215,E4:30,7:00,9:30
BEVERLY HILLS COP (R)
Fri.-Sat. only 11:30 p.m

Il

Animal House
Terminator
Heavy Metal
Rocky Horror

' .l LnA A, -
Breakfast Club
Fri. Harold & Maude
Sat. Fright Night
The Wall

I

D D
Support the
March of Dimes
BIPTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION
sPACE 'e a EC9 E Ra 5.ER

Bars and Clubs
The Apartment - (769-4060) - Yp-
silanti's Uni-Trax DJ spins 'em for a
Reggae Dance Party.
The Ark - (761-1451) - Martin Car-s
thy and John Kirkpatrick play folkI
music.
Bird of Paradise - (662-8310) -
The Ron Brooks trio jazzes it up.
The Blind Pig - (996-8555) Twist to
'60s tunes with (Bop) Harvey).
The Earle - (994-0211) - Groove to
solo pianist Larry Manderville.
Mr. Flood's Party - (995-2132) -
See Al Hill and the Headlites all night.
Mountain Jack's - (665-1133) Ron
Coden, musician and comedian, ap-
pears.
The Nectarine Ballroom - (994-
5436) - Benefit the Ronald McDonald
House by dancing with a WIQB DJ.
Rick's American Cafe - (996-2747)
- Tracy Lee and the Leonards will
mesmerize with musical rock-n-roll
theater.
U-Club - (763-2236) Giggle with
Laugh Track, UAC's open mike night.
Performance
Haunted Castle - Ann Arbor Civic
Ballet (Washtenaw Council for the
Arts)
The magic continues tonight at
7:30. See Tuesday's listing for more
details.
Campus Cinema
Diamonds Are Forever -(Guy
Hamilton, 1971) MED
James is at it again, fighting new ar-
ch-villains with yet new sophisticated
weaponry. Starring Sean Connery
and Jill St. John. Nat Sci, 7:00 p.m.
$2.50/single, $3.00/double.
Live and Let Die (Guy Hamilton,
1973) MED
It's impossible for a film to fail with
a title like this one, and Roger Moore
doesn't let you down. It is his first role
as 007, and he must face the
mysterious world of voodoo and the
occult to break a huge drug ring. Nat.
Sci, 9:15 p.m. $2.50/single,
$3.00/double.
Ghostbusters (Ivan Reitman, 1984)
MTF
In the smash success of last sum-

Bars and Clubs
The Apartment - (769-4060) -
Glass, a Detroit Top 40 band, is
smooth as.
The Ark - (761-1415) - Frightful
O.J. Anderson is the talking mime.
Bird of Paradise - (662-8310) -
The Ron Brooks trio jazzes up your
night.
The BLind Pig - (996-8555) -
Dress for the costume party and win a
prize.
The Earle - (994-0211) - Drift
along with pianist Larry Manderville.
Main Street Comedy Showcase -
(996-9080) - Laugh along with main-
stream Gary Kern.
Mr. Flood's Party - (995-2132) -
Finger lickin' good time with Los
Chickens.
Mountain Jack's - (665-1133) -
"Hot Fudge" star Ron Coden
sweetens your day.
The Nectarine Ballroom - (994-
5436) - Eurodisco with DJ Jacqui 0.
Rick's American Cafe - (996-2747)
- Funk it out with First Light,
shining in from Cleveland.
U-Club - (763-2236) - Experience
UAC's Soundstage, local music
groups.
Performance
Antique Pink - University Project
Theater
A 20-year-old kid is hired to paint a
70-year-old woman's apartment,
which hasn't been painted in 40 years.
The simple task evolves into an all-
day, all-night affair, ending in a
champagne breakfast. Heinrich
Henkel's play stars professional ac-
tress Kim Hunter. 8 p.m. at the Men-
delssohn Theater. Tickets are $3 - $9
for tonight's preview at the Michigan
League Box Office in advance and at
the door. For more information call
764-0450.
Dracula - Ann Arbor Civic Theater
Main Street Production
The classic horror story is brought
to life on the stage, as Thom Johnson
directs Bram Stoker's novel about the
Transylvanian count with a blood-
sucking fetish. 8 p.m. at the Ann Ar-
bor Civic Theater on 338 S. Main.
Tickets are $5 at the door. Call 662-
7282 for more information.
University Symphony Orchestra
Halloween Concert - U-M School of
Music
The very scary musical tradition
returns to Hill Auditorium as spirits
emerge from organ pipes. Audiences
are asked to wear costumes to this
annual favorite. 9 p.m. at Hill
Auditorium. Free. For more details
call 763-4726.
Yugoslavia Folk Ballet - University
Musical Society
A 45-member ensemble displays

RAE DAWN CHONG is ARNOLD SCHWARTZENEGGER'S reluctant

assistant in 'Commando.'
Yugoslav music and dance in Ann Ar-
bor for the first time in a decade. 8
p.m. at the Power Center. Tickets
are $11 and $15 in advance at Burton
Tower and at the door. Call 665-3717
for more info.
Campus Cinema
The Adventures of Sherlock
Holmes' Smarter Brother (Gene
Wilder, 1976) Hill St
A slapstick comedy starring Wilder
as Holmes' insanely jealous younger
brother, who eventually solves a
mystery with the help of Marty
Feldman, an eccentric with
"photographic hearing." Hill St, 7:15
p.m., and 9:00 p.m. $2.00.
Alexander Nevsky (S. Eisenstein,
1938) CG
An epic tale of Cherkassov and the
Russian army repelling a 13th cen-
tury German invasion that distur-
bingly parallels the world situation at
the time of its production. Russian,
with subtitles. Aud A, 8:00 p.m.
$2.00/single, $3.00/double.
Battleship Potemkin (S. -Eisenstein,
1925) CG
A great film of the silent era, it is
the stunning drama about a mutiny
by Russian soldiers on the battleship
"Potemkin" just before the Russian
Revolution. Aud. A, 7:00 p.m.
$2.00/single, $3.00/double.
Ghostbusters (Ivan Reitman, 1984)
MTF
See listings for Wednesday. Mich,

7:00 p.m., 9:00 p.m., and 11:00 p.m.
$2.50/students.
The Hunger (Tony Scott, 1983)Alt Act
New Wave vampire film starring
David Bowie and Catherine Deneuve.
Nat Sci, 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. $2.50.
The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)
MED.
In his maddest role to this date,
Jack Nicholson takes his family to a
winter resort where very unusual
things occur. Danny Lloyd stars as
the son with psychic powers. Kubrick
termed this a "classic" horror film.
MLB 4,7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. $2.50.
Furthermore
The Comet Halley: Once in a
Lifetime/Autumn Stars - University
Exhibit Museum
Witness this exciting space
phenomenon. Autumn Stars at 7:45
p.m., The Comet Halley at 8:15 po.m.
See Saturday's listing.
If you're planning on enter-
taining the University community
let us know. Send a short descrip-
tion of the event including time,
date, price, ticket information,
and a phone number for infor-
mational requests to: Entertain-
ments c/o The Michigan Daily,
420 Maynard, Ann Arbor MI
48109. Information must be
received three weeks prior to the
event.

By Mary Chris Jaklevic
D EBORAH VANHORN remem-
bers an accounting class she had;
as a student in the University's School
of Business Administration during the
early 1970s. She was the only woman
in the course, and the instructor often
singled her out to answer questions.
"I was picked on by the instructor
until we had the first exam and I got
one of the highest scores in the class.
It didn't bother me because I knew it
wouldn't last...It was like I had to
prove myself," she recalls.
Now at age 34, Vanhorn earns
$50,000 a year as a vice-president of a
financial advisory firm in Atlanta.
As she climbed the corporate lad-
der Vanhorn never shied away from
competing with males. "I used to, and
still do, excel in everything I under-
take," she says. "I think if you're
good at whatever it is that you do, it
doesn't matter what your competition
is.',
Vanhorn's confidence is typical of
college-educated women who have
plunged into the man's work world
and succeeded. In fact, that sort of
determination seems to remain the
most important force women must
muster to tear down sexual barriers
and work equally with men. For even
college-educated women still
dominate the low-paying, dead-end
jobs of the "pink collar" ghetto,
despite affirmative action programs
and legal protections against
discrimination.
In the past decade, women and men
have been equally represented in
colleges and universities, but the
women on the average earn less than
their male counterparts upon
graduation.
Working women over the age of 25
with four or more years of college
education earned 64 percent of the
wages garnered by men in 1983, ac-
cording to the U.S. Department of
Labor. Their salaries were even
lower on average than those of men
with only high school diplomas,
figures from the department show.
Harassment and interruptions in
women's careers to rear children ex-
plain only part of the discrepency. In
large part, the gap is the result of the
type and quality of education women
receive as well as the careers they
pursue.
Indeed, fewer women are currently
being trained for high-paying jobs. In
1980, 12.6 percent of all engineering
students in the country, 17.0 percent
of dentistry students, and 25.7 percent
of medical students were women. In
law schools, 34.0 percent of the
students were women. Biology was
the only science-oriented field in
which women - at 47.3 percent of
total enrollment - were nearly
equallyrepresented.
W omen aren't avoiding these
fields because of job scarcity or

salary disparity between men and
women, says Christine Black, a
senior research associate in the
School of Dentistry's Department of
Educational Resources, who recen-
tly produced a film about women in
the sciences.
In fact, in some fields, the com-
petition among firms to hire female
engineers is fiercer than for male
employees.
"In cases where a firm receives
federal funds, they have to show they
are making an effort not to
discriminate," Black says. "But I'd
like to think that other firms would
like to encourage women to go into
their field. I think that a lot of firms
are enlightened enough to do that."
Black instead thinks social
barriers discourage some women
from exploring traditionally male-
dominated fields.
Young women are not often en-
couraged to study math and science
by their parents and teachers, and
women know that if they do take ad-
vanced math or science courses they
will be one of few women in the class,
she points out.
The combination of a lack of female
role models in the sciences and
stereotypes of scientists that tend to
be unappealing to women further
contribute to this trend.
"Science is perceived as being an
all-consuming career. There is no
time left to be a parent or a spouse,"
Black says. "The image of a scientist
is of a white male who works in a lab
all day long, so absorbed that he
doesn't have time, for other things.
Science is not perceived as being a
people-oriented career."
Women who have researchers for
parents are more likely to pursue L
career in the science field because for
them such stereotypes are un-
justified.
Nancy Preckshot, a 1975 graduate
of the College of Engineering, says
her parents were positive forces in
her decision to enter the sciences.
"My father was a chemical engineer,
so I had some background in
engineering when I was growing up,"
she says.

Although Preckshot's mother was
a secretary, she also influenced her
daughter's career choice. "Had she
been in a different era, she would
have been a good engineer. The talen-
ts are there, but the sociological
pressures were such that she would
never consider it."
For Preckshot, attending classes
with men wasn't a problem. "I'm not
the kind who gets intimidated.. . I
suppose I thought it was a challenge,"
she says.
Vanhorn agrees that her family
background helped her decide to seek
a business career.
"I was raised to be independent and
to do my own thing," she says. "I had
a close relationship with my dad (who
was a manufacturing represen-
tative), so I became more comfor-
table with the business world."
Black believes that as more and
more women enter the technical
fields, the increasing number of
female role models - particularly
female professors - will encourage
more women to study the sciences.
But for now even women in those
fields tend to dominate the lower-
paying jobs available.
According to Elizabeth Babco,
assistant director of the Scientific
Manpowers Commission, women with
science degrees hold more teaching
jobs, which pay less than positions in
research and development. The
salary gap lengthens over time, she
added.
Data from the National Academy of
Sciences show that in 1983, females
with doctoral degrees in engineering

and science who were employed less
than five years earned $27,600 a year
while their male counterparts earned
$32x100.
0~ VERALL, WOMEN cluster in the
lower-paying sectors of the work
force. Although women in 1983 were
actually more likely than men to have
a professional orrtechnical oc-
cupation, they comprised almost all
of the registered nurses, two-thirds of
the grade school teachers in that
category, but only a quarter of the
lawyers and five percent of the
engineers, according to the labor
department.
In 1983 the biggest earnings gap
within an occupation was in sales.
Women salespeople earned only 35
percent of what men made, primarily
because women sold less valuable
merchandise, like clothing, while
men earned bigger commissions for
selling cars and appliances.
Also, although women now own

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12 Weekend/Friday, October 25, 1985

Weekend/

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