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October 25, 1985 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Doily - Friday, October 25, 1985- Page 5

'Twister'pI
(Continued from Page 1)
Homecoming.
APPROXIMATELY 30 students
jumped into the middle of the Diag
mat, and turned themselves inside out
for the first of two Twister games.
They complained of stiffening
muscles and found themselves in
positions that would jeopardize the
career of any respected senator.
But even after that, most conceded
- through red, strained, faces - that
they were having a great time.
Becky Klekamp managed a smile
even with her left leg outstreched,
right leg bent underneath, and both
arms flailed out in opposite direc-
tions. With typical Twister tenacity,
she vowed to play to the end, refusing
to bow to other players.
"I WAS here first," Klekamp told
the player while her hand claimed a
yellow circle.
But gradually, Klekamp fell.
(Continued from Page 1)
University."
Although the student demand for
Homecoming may not have affected
the activities of the returning alumni,
the typical events that UAC now coor-
dinates were non-existent between the
late '60s to mid-'70s. Few were in-
terested.'
ACCORDING TO Kay Vanden-
Bosch of the Alumni Association, "It
has only been in the last five or six
years that the Homecoming tradition
has been revived at Michigan."
"The students plan Homecoming,
and during that time of Vietnam and
other widespread activism,
Homecoming was not included in
their interests," she said.
Past indifference toward
Homecoming is best reflected by a
pall taken by Daily writer Dan Borris
in 1972.
It read: "Although 98.6 percent of
the people canvassed recognized
Homecoming either by its first name,
last name, or middle initial, 36 per-
cent of those surveyed wondered why
in the world anyone would want to
come to Ann Arbor in October.
The Mudbowl, which is traditionally
played by the Sigma Alpha Epsilon
and Phi Delta Theta fraternities, was

ayers tied in knots at Diag game
Referees Mark Chekal and Hillary only three twisted bodies sprawled out "Bless you," he told the referees.
Farber grew increasingly unpopular on the mat. Finally, it happened. Linn's legs
when they periodically constricted the JENNIFER Linn, an LSA fresh- were stretching from one row to the
rows of playing area as more man, Gary Warner, a Residential other. They said "left hand green"
Twistees spun out of the game. College freshman, and Bob Ruby, an and her trembling hand reached for-
Snaking in between the mass of con- LSA senior, were lined up with their ward valiantly. She toppled over with
torted bodies. Chekal and Farber hands and feet intertwined. In a mere grace.

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checked to see that no one touched the
mat with anything but a hand or leg.
Not even boos could keep the pair
from doing its job.
"HEY, THAT'S too bad," said
Chekal with a grin that flashed of
sadistic cruelty. "They're playing.
Yea, I like the power ... you're out."
Heather Taylor, an LSA freshman,
blamed her ouster on the judges. r
"They wouldn't let us use the outer
row," she explained. "There was no
way I could get my hand on blue ...
they wouldn't let you double'up. they
were terrible. Get new refs."
After about 35 minutes, there were
appeal gCZ7
started in 1934 by a pre-Homecoming
football game that was not cancelled
despite a lot of rain and.mud. After
that, "The tradition was established,"
according to Sigma Alpha Epsilon
member K.C. Groves.
SINCE THEN, two sororities have
also been picked to play during half-
time through a "secret process,"
Groves said. This yearKappa Alpha
Theta and Chi Omega will do battle.
Although Homecoming's popularity
has gone up and down, "the Mud Bowl
has consistently drawn anywhere
from 1,500 to 2,000 people.
Another major Homecoming event
is the conference of alumni directors,
in which Burley and about 150 others
are participating.
Bob Forman, executive director of
the alumni association, thinks "alum-
ni want to continue to generously help
.. there is no better opportunity for
alumni to get together during the
year. Although this is a conference for
active alumni, we are expecting
somewhere between 1,200 to 1,300
people for the Go Blue Brunch on
Saturday."
And Burley will probably be one of
them.

three words - left foot yellow" -
Ruby was out of the race.
Greeted with claps of en-
couragement, Ruby left the mat with
his head held high.
"Third place was respectable. I
don't have to go home in shame," he
said.
Meanwhile, Linn and Warner bat-
tled it out for the championship;
using, literally - well almost - the
whole of their existence.
TENSION rose with Warner
precariously balanced on his back
with his legs crossed in front and his
arms supporting him from behind.
His wrist was shaking, his face was red
red. The end had surely come.
But then "left foot blue" was called,
he regained his balance, and the game
continued.

"If I hadn't breathed, I'd still be in
there," Linn said between gasps of
air. She attributes her flexibility to
her experience as a cheerleader and
gymnast, and added, "After this, I'm
going to major in Twister."
As far as the proud winner is con-
cerned, Warner felt the gift of a
Homecoming T-shirt was worth con-
torting his body into every imaginable
position. A former ballet dancer, he
admitted that he never really played
the game before, but would in the
future.
Then, the game started over again.
It was time to spin the spinner, and
call the shots.

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DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND DRAMA
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE
The Dining Room
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October 24-27
Ubu Roi
by Alfred Jarry
November 7-10
Marathon 33
by June Havoc
November 21-24
A Doll's House
by Henrik Ibsen

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