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October 23, 1985 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 23, 1985

6

Mallory

vs.

Ma :Michigan-Indiana game pits
father, sons; mom neutral

By JOE EWING
When Eleanor Mallory comes to
Michigan Stadium to watch her sons
Mike and Doug play defense for the
Wolverines against Indiana Saturday,
don't be surprised if she doesn't cheer
too loudly for the Maize and Blue.
She's got another interest on the field.
Bill Mallory, Eleanor's husband
and Mike and Doug's father, is the
Hoosier's head coach.
"SHE JUST can't win," said Mike

Mallory of his mother. "I think she's
got the toughest part. In the end
though, I think she'll go for my dad.
She's got to live with him."
"She's the one that's caught in bet-
ween," said Bill Mallory of his wife.
"But she handles it well. She's been
able to deal with it."
For that matter, all of the Mallory's
have been able to deal with the
rivalry, which began before last
season when Bill was named to the

1

AP Top Twenty
Michigan may have lost to the
number one Iowa Hawkeyes
Saturday, but the damage is
proving to be minimal in the polls.
Just as they did in yesterday's UPI
poll, the Wolverines slipped to
fourth in the new Associated Press
rankings, down two notches from
last week.
Iowa, on the other hand, reaf-
firmed its position as the nation's
top team, collecting all 60 first-
place votes and easily outdistan-
cing second place Florida. The
Gators jumped from fifth to
second, while Penn St. moved up
three notches to number three.

Record
1. Iowa (60)...........6-0-0
2. Florida ............5-0-1
3. Penn State........6-0-0
4. MICHIGAN ........5-1-0
5. Nebraska ..........5-1-0
6. Auburn .............5-1-0
7. BYU ...............6-1-0
8. Air Force ...........7-0-0
9. Ohio State ..........5-1-0
10. Oklahoma ..........3-1-0
11. Florida State .......5-1-0
12. Oklahoma State ....4-1-0
13. Baylor .............6-1-0
14. Arkansas ...........5-1-0
15. Miami, (Fla.).......5-1-0
16. Tennessee .......... 3-1-1
17. UCLA ..............5-1-1
18. LSU..............4-1-0
19. Texas............4-1-0
20. Minnesota ..........5-1-0

Pts
1,200
1,086
1,007
986
946
864
761
750
676
598
553
514
465
435
396
317
264
243
220
89

position at Indiana after leading Nor-
thern Illinois to the 1984 California
Bowl championship. To them, it's
just a part of the game.
"I DON'T make a big deal out of it,
and I don't think they do either,"
noted the eldest Mallory. "I don't try
to deal with it much differently than
any other ball game."
The Hoosier head man showed that
in last season's contest, in which
Michigan squeaked out a 14-6 victory
after being scared more than once.
Late in the fourth quarter of that
game, Indiana had just scored a
touchdown and was driving deep into
Michigan territory when a Hoosier
receiver was called for offensive pass
interference against Mike, a
linebacker and defensive co-captain
this season.
"They said that he pushed off on
me," recalled Mike. "There was some
question about the call."
AND BILL Mallory was fuming.
"I remember looking over across
the field after that whistle and he was
storming all over the place," said
Doug Mallory, a junior defensive back
who did not see action in the contest
due to a back injury.
"That's something that we don't
talk about at home," admitted Mike of
the call, noting that it still strikes a
tender nerve in his dad.
THERE ARE plenty of other things
for the coach and his sons to talk
about, mainly centered around the
game they love.
"I usually call him every Sunday af-
ter the games and we talk about how
things went," said Mike. But I didn't
this week. I talked to my mom and
brother (Curt, a budding sophomore
linebacker at Bloomington South High
School), but I didn't talk to him. I'll
probably call this week, maybe on
Thursday or so, just to say hello."
Of course, a lot of the things the
elder Mallory might pick up from
films of his sons could look familiar,
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REFRIGERATOR
Phone: 429-5672
or 815-895-2443
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as the boys picked up the basics of the
game from him during his well-
traveled career as a gridiron coach.
After stints as an assistant at
Bowling Green, Yale and Ohio State,
Bill Mallory took over the head spot at
Miami (Ohio) that was vacated when
Bo Schembechler moved to Michigan.
After five winning seasons and a 16-7
upset in the 1974 Tangerine Bowl over
Florida, he went on to Colorado for
five years and then to Northern
Illinois. The Mallorys were at Nor-
thern when the time came for Mike to
decide which college he would attend.
"MY CHOICE came down to
Michigan and Northern Illinois,"
remembered Mike. "I chose
Michigan. I like the tradition here and
the way they stress the academics
and athletics. But it was really tough
telling my dad that I decided to play
for Michigan. There were some
tears."
With Mike a Wolverine, it was a lot
easier for Doug to follow two years
later.
"I think Mike had a lot to do with
it," said the younger brother. "We've
always been close and having family
up here already was a big thing."
Despite his sons' decisions to come
to Michigan, Bill Mallory has no hard
feelings.
"I have a lot of respect for Bo and
his kind of program, the kind a father
would want his sons to play for," said
the Indiana Mallory. "Football has
been important to both of those boys,
and I'm proud of what they've been
able to do."

TAKE THE LEAD
Help New Students or Their Parents
Discover the Diversity of Michigan
BE A SUMMER
ORIENTATION
LEADER
Pick up applications at the
Orientation Office, (3000 Michigan Union) or call
764-6290 for further information.
an affirmative action non-discriminatory employer

Daily Photo by DAN HABIB
Back-up strong safety Doug Mallory talks with starting safety Ivan Hicks
on the sidelines. Doug and his brother Mike will oppose their father, In-
diana head coach Bill Mallory, when the Wolverines battle the Hoosiers
Saturday.

Stickers look to future

By CHRISTIAN M. MARTIN
The Michigan stickers, who have
won only two games in the last two
years and have scored just three goals
in 15 games this season have resigned
themselves to the future, according to
head coach Karen Collins.
In a year racked with injury and
defeat, the only salvagable part of the
team has been the defense - one that
includes four Olympic developmental
"B" players, and is the only reason
Michigan has stayed close in most of
its games this year.
ASIDE FROM the defense, the
other parts of the team are weak. The
offense is frequently outshot by 20 or
more and has failed to control the ball
in the opponent's end consistently.
The midfielders whose job it is to
clear the ball out of the Michigan zone
and out to the forwards to start the at-
tack have had little success. "Our

strength is our defense," said Collins,
"then our midfielders and then our
forwards."
This is a young team, however. It
has no seniors, eight juniors, six
sophomores, and five freshman, and
the future looks reasonably bright.
"Our goal is to play .500 next year,"
added Collins. "Then after that, a
winning record, and five years from
now, being successful."
The older players on the team, like
junior Joan Taylor, feel that
"definitely next year" they will have
a winning record.
BUT AS standout goalie Maryann
Bell points out, "It's very hard
coming to a university and having
aspirations and seeing no material
results. If I don't see a winning team,
I'll be happy to be part of the teams
that turned it around."
As the older players like Bell, a

Ia

O~No
\\ee e
:.e ~g n 0Ce .r syls
co ' 5\\o o Ogrt
_. a e ta eCtg°da~

1

Practicing Pharm. D.s discuss
Career Opions
For
Doctor of Pharmacy Graduates
A U-M College of Pharmacy seminar
open to all students
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23-7-9 P.M.
3554 C. C. Little Bldg.
(corner of Church & Geddes)
College staff members will be present to answer questions about
admissions to U-M Doctor of Pharmacy program.

junior, get squeezed out, and removed
from close games to allow the
younger people to play, the experien-
ce of the team grows. Coming into thi
year few of the older players had ex-
perience, and with the goal for next
season being .500 hockey, not the Big
Ten championship, the older players
have become expendable at the price
of the younger players.
"We are building a program here,"
said Collins.
SO THE OLDER players who
shaped the beginning of this
rebuilding process will not see the
benefit of all of their hard work untie
after they have been alumni for a year
or two.
With all the injuries and the
frequent play of the freshman and
sophomores the experience factor
looms big as an advantage in the up-
coming years.
"(Freshman) Sara Clark and Robin
Ives have started almost every game
for us in the Big Ten this year and
have gained a.lot of experience,
Collins said.
Considerable playing time as
juniors will give them the experience
of most seniors while they still have
another year of wearing the Maize
and Blue.
Game-situation experience and
potential indicate the Wolverines
could be contenders in two or three
years, espeically when the solid
freshmen corps, starts to shine.
GRIDDE PICKS
Griddes has once again been swept
up in bitter controversy.
Angry protesters greeted the CIA's
recruiting visit yesterday. And their
cries grew louder when several CIA
officials were seen entering the
Student Publications Building.
One official was heard to say
believe that playing Griddes is the
best preparation for any career."
Griddes staff refused to comment.
Griddes winners recieve a Dooley's
guest pass good for two and Pizza Ex-
press full-tray Sicilian pizza, Chicago
stuffed pizza, or whole sub sandwich.
1. Indiana at MICHIGAN
(pick total points)
2. Wisconsin at Illinois 9
3. Ohio State at Minnesota
4. Iowa at Northwestern
5. Michigan State at Purdue
6. West Virginia at Penn State
7. Virginia Tech at Florida
8. Kentucky at Georgia
9. Florida State at North Carolina
10. Oklahoma State at Kansas
11. Colorado at Nebraska
12. Southern Cal at Notre Dame
13. Houston vs. Arkansas at Little Rocl
14. TCU at Baylor
15. Texas at SMU
16. California at UCLA
17. Georgia Tech at Tennessee
18. Basketball meets Lacrosse:
Georgetown at Johns Hopkins
19. Montana at Montana State
20. Indiana Jones vs. DAILY LIBELS
at Temple of Doom

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