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October 23, 1985 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 23, 1985

4

Taubman
encourages
well-rounded
education

(Continued from Page 1)
Taubman started thinking about the
formation of such a program after
reading a magazine article in 1973.
The article claimed that, at one time,
the United States stood proud; sud-
denly it became one of the most self-
doubting, countries in the world.
Taubman was disturbed by the fact
that the average reader would read
the article and take the statement to
be true without knowing the facts. He
felt the credibility of the press was too

Magazine, as examples of the
strength of the media.
He said the problem lay with the
"inabilitytof the reporter and (the
reader) to compare, analyze, and
balance what was being published."
Taubman said the solution would be to
educate the readers more thoroughly.
The Program in American In-
stitutions has been established at the
Unviversity of Michigan, Taubman's
alma mater, and also at Brown Un-
iversity, where one of his sons went to
school. Each school, said Taubman,
approaches the program's objectives
in its own way.
As to the success of the program,

Taubman felt that it was working well.
He said that it is "ably led" by
Jackson and Katherine Kurtz, the
manager of the program, and that
there has been a steady growth in the
student participation. He added that a
"superb team of faculty" had been
recruited for the program.
Taubman read a quote from Ed
Fisk, a reporter for the New York
Times, who called the program "the
best buy in college education."
Not only does Taubman hope to
educate students, but he also wants
the program to help students "fun-
ction as leaders in institutions into the
21st century."

Forum held on
campus research

strong.
TAUBMAN cited two recent court
cases, Gen. William Westmoreland
vs. CBS and Ariel Sharon vs. Time

... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... ......................::.:.......................... ... . . . . .
.:....:.::.:..:.::.:..:.::........... ..................... . . . . . . .
CIA recruitmnent goesaon desp ite student protests

(Continued from Page 1)
Dmitri Iwlitzin, were arrested and
charged with trespassing.
MAY, WHO Monday said she
thought the protesters had as much
right to demonstrate as other students
ha& to be interviewed, said yesterday
she: read the trespass act because
students with interviews were having
trouble getting into the office.
As police took the arrested demon-1
strators to a police wagon parked out-
sidC, the other protesters rushed to
the vehicle. Several members of the
group sat down in front of the police
wagon blocking the vehicle's path.
After being warned to move by
police, ten were arrested and charged
with hindering and opposing a police
officer.
ALL THOSE arrested were
released yesterday afternoon on their
own recognizance and were given
couft dates next month. Heatley said
he expected the country prosecutor to
press charges.
Despite the protests, the CIA
managed to interview 17 University
students, according to May. Only one
student failed to show up for an inter-
view, but May couldn't determine if
the absence was due to the demon-
sttations.
CIA interviews are expected to con-
tinue today, and protesters said they

plan to meet again at the SAB at 8
a.m.
AFTERWARDS protesters said
they hadn't planned on being
arrested. "We've talked about it in the
past, that something like this could
happen in the future. But I don't think
anyone expected that they might be
arrested today," said Mark Wein-
stein, an LSA junior involved in the
protest.
Buchen, who was the first to be
arrested, said he would probably file a
brutality complaint against the Ann
Arbor police, who he says "roughed
him up" while arresting him.
Also, witnesses claim that two of the
people arrested for blocking the police
wagon, graduate student Mark
Weisbrot and LSA senior Susan
Shatkin, were not sitting in front of the
vehicle when the warning was made.
THE OTHERS arrested were local
resident Andrew Boyd, Jane Kirsch-
man, Keith Lyon, and Joseph Libeer,
LSA junior David Isaacson,
engineering senior Jodie McCann,
LSA junior Marian Milbauer, and LSA
junior Mark Culliton.
Protesters say they oppose the CIA
for its activities abroad. A leaflet that
protesters passed out at the rally said
the CIA is running and coordinating
the war by the Contras against the
Nicaraguan government. In addition,
the leaflet says the CIA has helped

'We've talked about it in the past that
something like this could happen in the
future. But I don't think anyone expected
that they might be arrested today.'
- Mark Weinstein, CIA protester

(Continued from Page 1)
college's student newsletter.
After expressing his fear of
"coming into a hostile crowd of
engineers," Marx said the University
should impose restrictions on resear-
ching weapons systems and said that
researchers have a "moral respon-
sibility" to examine the implications
of their work on human lives.
"ACADEMIC freedom does not
mean the freedom to do whatever you
want; it has certain restrictions, as all
freedoms do," Marx said.
Jaffe, after challenging Marx's
technical knowledge of the military
projects he has protested, said that
"research is fundamentally a good
thing - who's funding it really makes
no difference."
Defense department funding is
necessary, Jaffe said, because
"people in general seem to have a
problem - they like killing each
other. I don't know why."
HE THEN emphasized the non-
military applications of the work done
by engineering professors Thomas
Senior and George Haddad. Marx and
other PSN members were arrested
for demonstrating in these professors'
laboratories in 1983 and 1984.
Although Marx and other protesters
have claimed that Haddad's work in
microwave devices can be applied to
weapons such as the F-14 fighter and
the Phoenix Missile, Jaffe said the
work can also be used for civilian
radar and satellite communication
systems.
Haddad has stated that weapons
systems are not the primary focus of
his work.
JAFFE ADDED that Senior's
research projects, which perform ex-
periments with electro-magnetic
pulses, can be used to shield airplanes
from lightning.
Marx agreed that "research is fun-
damentally a good thing and an im-

portant part of a university," but he
reiterated that "it carries certain
responsibilities, and we have to look
at what it will be used for."
Jaffe countered that individual
professors should be trusted to refrain
from performing unethical research,
and that any restrictions on military
research would violate academic
freedom and hurt the College of
Engineering.
"FUNDING for research is the only
thing that keeps the engineering
college going," he said, adding that he
doesn't think the average person
"goes more than an hour without
benefitting in some way from
engineering research."
Marx expressed the fear that as the
Department of Defense's influence
over campus research increases -
particularly because of an infusion of
funds for 'Star Wars' research -
professors will eventually become
dependent on defense department
funding.
According to figures provided by
the University's Office of Research,
Development, and Administration,
the University's share in research
funds has risen substantially over the
past five years. In 1980, the year
President Reagan was elected, the
University received $3.7 million in
defense department funds. This figure
has gradually risen, reaching $6.6
million this year.
MARX AND Jaffe also debated the
nature of activism, with Jaffe saying
the Marx's ignorance of the civilian
applications of research invalidates
his participation in protests.
Marx, while saying that sit-ins are
not necessarily the best method of
demonstrating because they create a
"confrontational atmosphere,"
defended his past actions as
necessary for spurring the current
dialogue within the University about
research issues.

A

overthrow legitimate governments
that existed in Chile and Guatemala,
in addition to training secret police in
South Africa and "death squads" in
El Salvador.
"Do you know what it was like for
me, an American, to be at my friend's
funeral knowing that my tax dollars
helped support those that killed
him?" asked Peter Rossett, a biology
teaching assistant, at the rally on the
Diag.
ROSSETT, who has spent time in
Nicaragua, said his friend had been
killed by "CIA-backed" Contras.
The protesters also encountered op-
position from people other than
police. One University alumnus who
wouldn't identify himself, said he had
to hand in a job application to the of-
fice, and that the protesters were in-
fringing on his rights.

"I don't give a fuck about the CIA,"
he said, "I just want to get in there."
HUGH, a student who was inter-
viewed by the CIA and wouldn't give
his last name, told the protesters,
"You have a right to express your
opinion, I have a right to be inter-
viewed." He added, "They think
there's things wrong with America, I
think America is the best country in
the world."
The Michigan Student Assembly
last night passed two resolutions
relating to the arrests. One chastised
University President Harold Shapiro,
Vice President for Student Services
Henry Johnson, and the Ann Arbor
Police for "brutally" arresting
protesters.
The resolution also "demanded a
written explanation of the Univer-
sity's role in the arrest of students."

0
4

-I

)

Al

6i

74l 0U5i7

LOST & FOUND
LO$T! Yellow folder at GRAD 11:00 p.m. 10/16
by copiers. REWARD for Return! Call 769-3159.
89A1024
LOST: Brown leather jacket. "Mark Shale" label.
Reward $25. No questions asked. 764-1838.
77A1025

FOR SALE

GREEK GAB

LEASE FOR SALE - Women's double in
South Quad. 764-7621, Sheila. 69B1024
FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM available immediately in North
Campus co-op. $285/Mo. includes food, laundry,
utilities, many extras. Karen 663-9283. 99C1105

FOR SALE

GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1 (U repair).
Also delinquent tax property. Call 805-687-6000
Ext. GH-10152 for information. 32B1113
'80 DATSUN 210-Red, new tires. Runs like a
dream. $2000 or best offer. 769-6462. 68B1024
'75,FIAT WAGON, fwd, manual, fold-down plus
original rack for cargo but compact on A,
streets, reliable starter. $450 or offer. 761-7235.
61B1023
19'r COLOR TV $175. 663-78201 year old. 82B1025
1980 PINTO - 82,000 miles, good condition,
cassette, 4-speed. $1250.00 or best offer. 572-1314
after 5:00. 73B1024

DORM DOINGS

SIGMA GAMMA RHO presents The Color Blue:
A party and pledge line intro on Saturday
October 26 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. in Pendleton Room,
Union. NCE1023
JENNIFER AND GAIL
Amazing S.Y.R. Thurs. night.
C&E
NCE1023
PERSONAL
DON'T MISS ANYTHING. SAVE TOO. 15% off on
contact lens supplies.at the Village Apothecary.
1112 S. University. cFtc
DO YOU SEND VIDEOS to friends or relatives
overseas? Convert them to PAL or SECAM at
Video Conversions International. Call for special
rates! (312) 726-6556. 71F1024
MEN'S WORKSHOP - WOMEN'S WORKSHOP.
Meeting separately, then together, October 25-27.
$35 registration plus sliding scale professional
fee. Bob Blood, Ph. D., Margaret Blood, M. A.
769-0046. cF1024
MALE BOY GEORGE FAN would like to form
support group for men ii terested in dressing with
complete freedom. Discreet individuals reply to
JIM, P. O. Box 732, Plymouth, MI 48170. 91F1104
A CUT ABOVE HAIR DESIGN - Special $5 off
any service, first visit only. Call 662-2544 for
appointment. cFtc

TARDA' presents its annual science fiction and
fantasy costume ball Saturday October 26th at
8:30, in the Anderson Room of the Michigan
Union. Admission with costume $2, without
costume $3. 83D1025
Use Daily Classifieds

STUDENT SERVICES
ACE Word processing, student discount.
769-9069. 21G1120
ACCURACY INK'
Editing/Word Processing
Reasonable Rates. 971-4139.
cGtc
GMAT/LSAT. Stanley Kaplan Educational
Center, class to prepare for January GMAT exam
begins October 24th. Classes to prepare for
December LSAT exam begin October 27th and
November 6th. Call 662-3149. c1023
ANSWERING SERVICE. Computerized, 24 hours,
only $7.50 per month! 451-7121. 97G1029
ESEARCH PAPERS
14,278 to choose from-all subjects
Order Catalog Today With Visa/MC or COD
800-351-0222
in Calif. (213) 477.8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Assistance
11322 Idaho Ave. #206-SS, Los Angeles CA 90025
Custom research also available-all levels
Writers' Block
Cured
Send $2 for catalog of over 16,000 topics,
to assist your writing efforts and help you
beat Writers' Block. For info., call TOLL-
FREE 1-800-621-5745. (In Illinois, call 312-
922-0300.) Authors'Research, Rm. 600-N, 407
South Dearborn, Chicago, IL 60605.
85J1030

HELP WANTED

WANTED: Experienced banquet waiters.
Part-time. 971-1386. 25H1024
GOVERNMENT JOBS. $16,040 - $59,230/yr. Now
Hiring. Call 805-687-6000 Ext. R-10152 for current
federal list. 59H1030
DESPERATELY seeking buspeople for dinners;
to serve/clean up for 20 people. Call Liz 668-0241
or 761-4810. 98H1029
REWARD - Free Trip to Daytona plus
Commission Money. WANTED: Organized group
or individual to promote the #1 Spring Break
to Daytona. If interested, call 1-800-453-9074
immediately! 72H1023
SINGING MESSENGERS for balloon delivery.
Flexible hours, must have car. Call 995-1972,
between 10 and 5. 96H1105
DISPATCHER-DRIVER. Evening food delivery
service. Use company vehicles. Make up to
$8.00/hour. Call 665-4122. 95H1101
CAB DRIVERS WANTED. Flexible hours.
663-4545 days or nights. 42H1028
STUDENT MAGICIAN NEEDED November 2nd.
$50 for evening. Please call 764-0897. 39H1028
STUDENT PHONATHON CALLERS WANTED -
The School of Dentistry will be interviewing
students by phone for part-time evening employ-
ment. Callers will be phoning alumni nationwide
for support of the School's programs. Calling ses-
sions will be held Monday through Thursday
evenings, October 31 through November 21, with
some flexibility as to number of sessions you are
expected to attend.
Callers will be paid $4.00 per hour plus nightly in-
centives, snacks and paid training session.
Call 763-3253 between 10:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
October 22-25. The University of Michigan is a
nondiscriminatory, affirmative action employer.
94H1024
PIZZA DELIVERY DRIVERS. Car required.
Part time, one or two nights/week. Hourly
wage, tips and mileage. Apply in person Omega
Pizza, 101 Washtenaw Place, near U of M
Hospital. 56H1029
TELEPHONE & COUNTER HELP. Lunch
hour Monday thru Friday, & Sunday 4:30p.m. -
9 p.m. Apply in person Omega Pizza near U
of M Hospital. 57H1029

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - ALL KINDS - Fast, efficient service.
Reasonable rates. Laurie, 973-1592. cJtc
A-1 TYPING - On Campus. Professional Rush
Service Available. 668-8898. cJ1211
Papers/Resumes/Coverletters
EXECU-TOPS Word Processing 663-7158
cJtc
TYPING - All types. Fast guaranteed work
a reasonable rates. 668-6109. 85J1113
THE NEW SCHOOL OF PIANO
First lesson complimentary. 994-0371
cJl2ll
SANDI'S TYPING & WORD PROCESSING
"*20% Off 1st paper (with this ad)***
Fast & accurate. Papers, briefs, resumes, letters,
theses. Campus pick-up & delivery. 426-5217.
cJtc
REALM'S
LSAT COURSE
November 12 - December 5
Reasonable Rates.
665-3579 70J1109
ACCUTYPE
WORD PROCESSING
Resumes, Papers, Cover Letters, Etc
Complete Secretarial Service
Available Same Day Service
761-5050
cJtc
MUSICAL
LESSONS - Special: Pay for 4, take 5. Best
teachers in Mich. Expert REPAIRS. Herb David
Guitar Studio. 665-8001. cNtc

4

0

DAILY CROSSWORD PUZZLE
Edited by Trude Michel Jaffe

ACROSS
1 "- girl!"
5 Grecian belts
10 Roman author
14 Gull genus
15 - four
16 Potter's re-
quirement
17 Tenth of an
ephah
18 Dill seeds, in
the Bible
19 Cleopatra's
river
20 Solar or lunar
year excess
22 The Bulldogs'
school
23 When days are
done
24 Local official
26 Softens
28 Shakespeare's
prankish spirit
30 Understand
34 Thick cigar
37 Pirate's
treasure .
38 Excavator's
entry
39 Happen
42 Manner of
walking
43 Inasmuch as
45 Supporter of
government by
the few
47 Collected
49 Showy parrot
50 Disc jockey's
media
52 Biblical landing
site
56 Serve tea
r -,- tl.-

DOWN
1 "A Lesson from
-":1981
Fugard play
2 Sunshine State
port
3 Pay the tab
4 "Enterprise",
e.g.
5 Nos. person
6 Counting
rhyme word
7 Iron horse, e.g.
8 Championship
9 In (intrin-
sically)
10 Oregon Trail
vehicles
11 Tel-
12 Distant: Prefix
13 Purse fillers
21 Counterweight
25 Trillionth: Prefix
27 Collar stiffener
29 Catchall abbr.
31 Frost
32 Auricular
33 False notion

34 Stand the test
35 An Adams
36 Marmalade
ingredient
40 Small one:
Suffix
41 Costa-
44 Airline abbr.
46 Hungarian coin
48 Comestible
51 Acquired
relative

53 Futuristic
figure
54 The Colos-
seum, e.g.
55 Picture card
56 Spotted cavy
57 Burden
58 "Do -
others..."
60 General
Bradley
64 Letter abbrs.

n

CONFIDENTIAL
INEXPENSIVE
GYNECOLOGICAL CARE
Planned Parenthood
3100 Professional Dr., Ann Arbor
(near Washtenaw & Huron Pkwy.)
973-0710 cFtc
STUDENT SERVICES
RESUMES - written - also word processed or
typeset; coverletters, too. 662-4530. cGtc

1

141

HELP WANTED

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
A STOL A T OR A L
ETAM I NE LATERAL
REGENTS ASTA IRE
ARE GOTOTHEDOGS
TINS NA RE RISES
E L DER T E RM NOS E
ESCUDOS INESSE
R E AR FE E S
08 FINESSE
MART ERAL DEALT
A LE AP A T TA S TE R
H A NG INTH E RE I CY
A N TE NNA RA D IA TE
S C0N CE S E RE C TOR
E NT E A S HE R S
10123/86
15 16
18 19
22 23

ATTENTION
MSA-Recognized
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Advertise For
FREE
In the LSA Student Government Journal.
For more info. call the LSA-SG Office
at 763-4799
LSA Student Government
4403 Michigan Union
76G1024

PRIVATE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL now
accepting appointment for part-time physical
education teacher. 668-6770. 86H1025
SECRETARY - Full or part time needed for new
business Ann Arbor area. 668-2435. 87H1023
DO YOU HAVE PIMPLES OR ACNE? Earn
$75-$100. Volunteers needed to test medication for
facial acne. Office visits and medication are
provided free to eligible participants. You must
have moderately severe acne (12 pimples or more.)
$75-$100 paid at the successful completion of
the 12-14 week studies. Call UM Department
of Dermatology Research 763-5519, M-F, 9-4, for
further details. 81H1025
AIRLINES NOW HIRING. Reservationists
stewardesses and ground crew positions
available.Call 1-619-565-1657 for details. 24 hrs.
58H1025
WANTED: MODEL for glamour art photography
for possible commercial reproduction. Also
make-up artist. Call for an interview 769-5745.
28H1101
HAIRCUT and COLOR models needed. Must be
adventurous and open to change. Also need
photogenic types for ads, etc. All services will
be FREE of charge. Call LAKY'S SALON
668-8812.512 South Main. 92H1028
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS at THE MICHIGAN
UNION for University of Michigan students,
preferably work-study students. Set-up staff
needed for part time work - shifts are very
flexible. If interested, please call Angela Hinz
on Wednesday or Thursday at 763-5911. 63H1023
RESUME?

THANKSGIVING
NEW YORK
FLIGHTS FROM $98
LaGuardia and Newark, Great Places Travel
Consultants, U of M Union Mall. Call immed-
iately 994-4777. cKtc
MISCELLAN EOUS
WANTED: MACINTOSH 512K image writer and
accessory kit and external disc drive. 429-9606.
93M1028
00

GOING PLACES

TICKETS

1 2 3i4

I

In

NEED DESPERATELY - Four Ohio State
tickets, not necessarily together. Top dollar paid.
Mark, 764-2030 after 6 p.m. 84Q1104
WANTED - 4 Purdue tickets. Call Steve
764-2822. NCQ1O28
DESPERATELY WANTED. OSU/Michigan
football tickets. 973-9582. cQtc
ABSOLUTE top dollar paid for UM football tick-
ets. Call 973-6327. cQtc
WANTED: 4 seats together, Mich-Indiana game
(call Bill, 485-4111) 59Q1025
NEEDED: 6 Ohio State tickets. Top dollar paid.
764-8627. 65Q1023
ROOMMATES

/.

24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 32 33
34 35 36

i

Aviation Careers'
I U.S. GOVT. POSITIONS I
' Prestige careers with medical,
retirement benefits plus paid va- I
cations. More than 2000 openings
nationwide for Air Traffic Control
' Specialists-permanent U.S. Civil
* Service positions. Aviation exp. I
I not necearv If sleetd vn will I

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