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October 22, 1985 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-22

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Page 8- The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 22, 1985
WOLVERINE WEEKEND WRAP-UP
Rivals serve losses to spikers

0

Blue Lines

k
rV/

By DEBBIE deFRANCES
When a volleyball team can serve well, it can win
points. When it can win points, it can win a match.
Sound simple? The Michigan volleyball team
doesn't think so. Because of poorly executed basic
skills, including serving, the Wolverines dropped a
pair of Big Ten matches this weekend, losing to
Illinois, 15-11, 15-7, -12-15, 15-10, and to Purdue 15-3,
15-12,15-4.
THE WOLVERINES, now 9-12, 1-7 in the con-
ference, struck out in serving and spiking according
to head coach Barb Canning.
"We missed a lot of serves, especially at crucial
times when we needed to get the points," said Can-
ning. "Purdue also had a lot of service errors, and we

173 kills, and performed with her usual refined
athletic ability.
"She (Williams) is always very consistent. She
gets to everything. She's just a key utility player,"
said Canning.
Despite this weekend of woes, the Wolverines still1
have been improving and are playing at a muchI
higher level than earlier in the season, according to
Canning. Michigan State, one of just two teams
lower in the Big Ten standings than Michigan,
travels to Ann Arbor Tuesday to meet the
Wolverines, and Canning is optimistic.
"If we keep playing at this level the rest of the
season, I think we can win the rest of our Big Ten
matches," Canning concluded.
Harriers buried
The Michigan men's cross country team travelled
to Madison this past weekend for what head coach
Ron Warhurst labelled "probably the best in-
vitational in the country." The Wolverines must
have come home feeling like they had mud kicked in
their faces as they finished last out of 12 teams.
The Wisconsin Cross Country Classic featured 10
of the top 15 teams in the country and was run on a
wet, slippery and muddy course which seriously
dampened the Wolverines' chances.
AFTER THE first mile and a half of the race,
senior Chris Brewster was leading when he slipped
and fell in the mud. Brewster mistakenly thought he
had a pulled muscle, so he stretched out before
rejoining the group. He had to run from the back of
the pack, but he did manage to make it into 59th
place, sandwiched between two of his teammates.
John Scherer was the team's top finisher in 58th
place and Joe Schmidt was close behind in 60th.
Michigan's next best finishers were Erik Koskinen
and John Chambers.
Warhurst is now putting this disappointing meet
behind him and is looking toward the Big Ten meet
which will be run on the Wolverines' home course on
Nov.2.
"Wisconsin will be a heavy favorite," Warhurst
noted. "We're hoping to make the top five."
Warhurst will run the team hard for the next week
before giving them a little rest before the conferen-
ce meet in hopes that the team will make a strong
showing in the Big Ten. They should at least have
the mud out of their eyes by that time.
- GREG MOLZON

Coleman out for season
ST. LOUIS (AP) - Examinations of injured St.
Louis outfielder Vince Coleman revealed a bone
chip in his left knee yesterday, and Dr. Stan London,
the club physician, said Coleman will miss the
remainder of the World Series.
St. Louis leads Kansas 2-0 in the best-of-7 series
with Game 3 scheduled for tonight.
COLEMAN was injured when his leg was caught
in the automatic tarpaulin machine as the field at
Busch Stadium was being covered prior to last Sun-
day's third game of the National League playoffs
against Los Angeles.
X-rays at first revealed no fractures and the Car-
dinals said he had suffered only bruises and con-
Brewster
... falls in mud
tusions. But Coleman was unable to put weight on
the leg and London made more extensive studies of
him when the team returned home Monday.
"The prescribed medication is six weeks rest,"
London said.
With Tito Landrum replacing Coleman in the
lineup, the Cardinals have won five straight games
- the final three of the NL playoffs to win the NL
pennant and the first two of the World Series.
Hayes leaves hospital
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Former Ohio State
University football Coach Woody Hayes was
discharged yesterday from the OSU Hospitals
where he had been treated for congestive heart
failure and a mild heart attack.
Hayes will continue his recovery at home, the
hospital said in a brief news release.
Hayes had been hospitalized since Sept. 29.

Williams
... leads team in kills

should have been able to get the ball and control the
serves, but we didn't.
"Their height was a definite advantage.
Especially with All-American MaryAnn Smith in
the front row, we couldn't get anything past her,"
Canning added.
WHILE BOTH Illinois, (28-0, first in theBig Ten)
and Purdue seemed smooth and polished with their
on-court teamwork, Michigan appeared scattered
and lost when handling the ball. Canning attributes
this to a lack of concentration and changing lineup.
- "Because Jenne Hickman is injured, we're never
sure who'll be starting," Canning said. "It seems
like we're never totally mentally prepared for the
game."
One bright spot for the Wolverines was Andrea
Williams. Williams leads Michigan on offense with

Ferris goes Canadian .. .
. . ,l' stays American
By ADAM OCHLIS
When the Canadian National Anthem was sung before Friday night's
Michigan-Ferris State hockey game, I quickly scanned my Bulldog roster
and noticed that all but two of their players came from north of the bor-
der. With the Wolverines only carrying three Canadians, last weekend's
series was not just another CCHA encounter. It was the Canadians again-
st the Americans.
This fact exemplifies the contrasting directions taken by two schools'
hockey programs and their respective coaches.
Both Ferris State and Michigan are in what can be called a rebuilding
year. Ferris finished in the cellar of the CCHA last season with a 8-23-1
mark while Michigan ended up seventh in the nine team conference.
Ferris' Dick Bertrand went north into Canada and recruited seventeen
players. The majority of these had played junior hockey and came to Big
Rapids as 20- and 21-year-old freshmen.
Michigan coach Red Berenson went a different route, heading both east
and west to Massachusetts and Minnesota. Only two of Berenson's
recruits are from Canada, and both are 18-years-old. The other incoming
freshmen came right out of U.S. high schools.
What causes Bertrand to concentrate on recruiting solely in places like
Saskatchewan and British Columbia? The reasons are numerous.
First off, Ferris State College is simply not the Mecca of collegiate
hockey. Show me a hockey player that is dying to play in Big Rapids and
I'll show you a foolish hockey player. Recruiting a top-notch prospect out
of a United States high school is hard enough, even for schools with rich
hockey traditions such as Michigan.
"There's a lot of competition for the same kids," Berenson said. "Last
year there were probably ten top college recruited players and there are
47 schools out for the same ten."
Bertrand said those numbers lead him across the border.
"We're a Michigan school and we would love to have all our players
from Michigan," said Bertrand. "But we take a back seat to Michigan, to
Michigan State, to Michigan Tech (and) to Northern. We ended up with
players who could help our program get back on its feet."
The problem with this style of recruiting is that by taking Canadians
out of junior hockey, these "freshmen" are really not freshmen. Two of
Bertrand's better recruits, Gary Sweetnam and Murray Winnicki are 21-
year-old freshmen, coming right out of the junior leagues, meaning that
they only have two years left of college eligibility. Granted they are both
excellent players, but Bertrand is obviously taking the win-it-now-or-else
approach, with no capability to rebuild.
A short cut
"They're stop gapping and we're looking to build on a four year plan not
a one- or two-year eligibility plan," explained Berenson. "When you bring
in a 21-year-old player you only have a couple of years ...
"We don't fashion our program after Ferris'."
Thank God.
In addition to the lack of quality high school seniors in the United
States, Bertrand's do-or-die approach might have resulted in his lack of
success at Ferris. His 45-64-8 record at Ferris State speaks for itself, and
rumors have been running wild that the ex-Cornell mentor's job may be
on the line.
Who's better?
Then, of course, there is the debate of whether Canada and its junior
leagues really do produce a higher quality player than the United States'
high schools. The general consensus seems to be that while Canadians
may be born with more natural ability, the United States' players are
more desirable to coaches.
Berenson, however does not think it matters where a player comes
from, as long as he is good.
"I don't think you can take one is better than the other;" Berenson said.
"this is a real myth that maybe was true 25 years ago, but it's not true
anymore that just because a kid is Canadian and playing in Canada
doesn't make him a great hockey player. It's a matter of the kid himself."
What this all means is that Berenson can develop a program with
players he'll have for four years while Bertrand will constantly be tur-
ning over Canadians with limited eligibility. In talking to Bertrand, you
get the feeling he would love to trade jobs with Michigan's Red Berenson.

6
6
a

i

CCHA Standings

No one faces cancer alone.
Call us.
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY'
TUESDAY
STEAK NIGHT

CCHA Scorecard

(OVERALL RECORD)
1. Bowling Green (3-1) ...
Michigan State (3-1) ..
Lake Superior (3-)...
4. MICHIGAN (2-2)..
Ferris State (2-2).
6. Western Michigan (3-1)
Illinois-Chicago (1-3) ..
Ohio State (1-3) .......
9. Miami (2-2)..........

W L T Pts.
3 1 0 6
3 1 0 6
3 1 0 6
2 2 0 4
2 2 04 4
1 1 0 2
1 3 0 2
1 3 0 2
0 2 0 0

B. Jones, UM..........
R. Schulter, FSC.......
Paul Lowden, FSC.......
S. Burnie, WMU........
J. Nelson, UIC.........
B. Powers, UM .........
P. Ysebaert, BGSU.
B. McCaughey, UM ......

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

6
3
5
5
3
4
5
5

9
8
8
8
7
7
7
7

WMPL Hockey Poll

Goaltending (overall)

1. Minnesota-Duluth (6)..
2. Minnesota (2) ........
3. Harvard............
4. Boston College (2) .....
5. Michigan State ........
6. Northern Michigan ..
7. Western Michigan .....
8. Bwling Green.....
9. Boston University.
10. Lake Superior State ..
10. RPI ..................

W L T
4 0 0
2 1 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
3 1 0
3 0 1
3 1 0
3 1 0
0 0 0
3 1 0
0 0 0

8

oz. NY Strip
$4*95
The Dinner
Alternative

Pts.
78
72
70
69
49
42
37
30
21
20
20
Pts
12
11
10
9

GP
J. Shawhan, LSSC ...... 1
B. Essensay, MSU...... 2
B. Horn, WMU........2
G. Kruzich, BGSU... 4
N. Foster, MSU.........2
T. Makris, UM.........2
B. Ryan, UIC...........2
B. Suhanek, Miami .... 1
K. McCaffrey, WMU ... 2
D. Sharpe, FSC ........ 2
R. Exelby, LSSC........3
R. Beedon, OSU ....... 2
B. Smith, Miami.......3
G. Raeburn, FSC...... 3
B. Lindgren, UM.......2
B. Krautsak, OSU ...... 3
J. Hickey, UIC........2
T. Hall, Miami......... 2

GA
2
5
5
14
7
7
8
4
8
7
16
'7
12
13
13
18
16
7

Avg
2.00
2.50
2.50
3.50
3.50
3.51
3.92
4.00
4.03
4.04
5.25
5.25
5.36
5.74
6.50
6.75
8.26
9.18

Say
15
61
54
125
59
51
50
17
51
67
67
35
52
86
56
61
54
10

Pct.
.882
.924
.915
.899
.894
.879
.862
.810
.864
.905
.807
.833
.813
.869
.812
.772
.771
.588

FRIDAY'S RESULTS
Bowling Green 8, Lake Superior 4
Ferris State 7, MICHIGAN 6
Western Michigan 5, Michigan State 1
Illinois-Chicago 8, Ohio State 3
Miami 7, Windsor 6
SATURDAY's RESULTS
Lake Superior 4, Bowling Green 2
Ferris State 10, MICHIGAN 5
Michigan State 4, Western Michigan 3
Ohio State 10, Illinois-Chicago 6
Miami 6, Windsor 4
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Bowling Green at MICHIGAN
Illinois-Chicago at Western Michigan
Miami at Michigan State
Ohio State at Lake Superior
Alabama-Huntsville at Ferris State
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Illinois-Chicago at Western Michigan
Miami at Michigan State
MICHIGAN at Bowling Green
Ohio State at Lake Superior
Alabama-Huntsville at Ferris State

CCHA LEADERS
Scoring (overall)
GP G

338 S. State

996-9191

G. Sweetnam, FSC........4
T. Stiles, UM............. 4
J. Wansbrough. BGSU ... 4
D. Dorion, WMU.........4

3
5

A
7
4

HALLOWEEN COSTUME FUN RUN
SPONSORED BY U-M CREW TEAM
Sunday, October 27, 1985-9:30 am
Best Costume.....................1st $100
2nd $ 75
3rd $ 50
2 MILE & 4 MILE RACE IN THE ARB
Medals to winners in age groups
Forms available at CCRB & Running Stores

ce: 'M' spikers and Spartans
_____________ to battle for respectability"

When a 4 hour test counts
as much as 4 years of school,
youd better be prepared.
LSAT,GMAT,GRE classes forming now

By DEBBIE deFRANCES
Tonight's match-up will not decide
the number one team in the nation,
but it might determine who is the wor-
st volleyball team in the Big Ten.
As the classic Michigan vs.
Michigan State rivalry falls into Ann
Arbor, the tenth-ranked conference
team, Michigan State, arrives to
challenge the number eight Big Ten
team, Michigan.
MICHIGAN STATE, 4-14, 0-8 in the
conference, hopes to win their first
conference match, but Michigan head
coach Barb Canning is confident that
her Wolverine squad will be vic-
torious.
"I think we've seen the best in the
Big Ten, so we know what we're up
against," Canning said. "We've been
improving every game and Michigan
State is one of the only teams below us
in standings."
Junior Michigan blocker, Jayne
Hickman feels that Michigan will not
only have to capitalize on the Spar-
tan's loss of a couple of key hitters,

but must learn to concentrate earlier in
the match.
"WE DON'T stay mentally in the
game. We have to relax.
"We have the talent to win and have
shown it periodically against other
tough teams," said Hickman.
Hickman also said her teammates
seem to have improved in defensive
abilities by playing the top teams in
the conference.
ANDREA Williams, a senior setter
who received All-Big Ten academic
honors last year, also feels there is a
definite improvement, especially
among the younger squad members.
"A lot of the players are starting to
improve individualy," Williams said.
"Jayne Hickmand and Heather Olsen

are coming together, starting to come
to their own."
At the same time, Williams thinks
that the Wolverines need to work on
their teamwork. "It doesn't matter
how strong one person is because
they're only one-sixth of the team,"
she said. "It takes a whole team to
work together. We've been having it
in spurts, but it needs to be effective
all the time."
ONE THING the Wolverines must
work on is a quicker offense, accor-
ding to Williams. She said although
Michigan has good hitters, more often
than not they are overcome by the
front line height of other Big Ten
teams.
Not only do Big Ten teams have the

height advantage over a typically
short Michigan team, but everyone,
even last-place MSU, also leads the
Wolverines in overall Big Ten
statistics.
The Spartans' strongest hitter,
averaging .246 on the season, is junior
Shantelle Schmidt. Schmidt is ranked
ninth in both hitting efficiency and
kills (159) in the conference.
Michigan State's Pam Wischmeyer
ranks among the top ten -of the Big
Ten in both aces and digs per game.
Teammate, Sharon Hekker is seventh
in the Conference in blocks per game,
averaging .94.
Michigan hopes to take advantage
of the home court and do nothing but
improve its dismal 1-7 Big Ten stan-
dings.

LSAT
GMAT
MCAT
SAT
ORE

Preparation for LSAT, GMAT,
GRE, MCAT, SAT. Day and
evening, weekday and weekend
classes. Guarantee: Score in
the top 2500 or take the next
course free.

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The National Center for
Educational Testing
NationalCenter

Stickers' efforts can't halt losses

I

By LIAM FLAHERTY
Appearances can be deceiving.
Witness the case this weekend as the
Michigan field hockey team dropped a
pair of 3-0 decisions. The games,
despite the identical scores, were
starkly different.
On Friday, the Wolverines were
sluggish in losing to Ohio State. The

The Universityof Michigan
ficeof
F{?f1cia1
Aid

offense was unable to move the ball,
and the stronger, faster Buckeye
team outshot Michigan 32-8.
Michigan's defense, although giving a
gutsy performance, lost the war of at-
trition, giving up three goals.
SAID COACH Karen Collins: "I was
not pleased with the effort today at

GUARANTEED
STUDENT LOANS
FALL-WINTER 1985-86

all. We didn't play our game."
On Sunday the effort, if not the final
result, improved. Collins said her
team "played very well." Very well
indeed considering their opponent,
number-one ranked Northwestern. A
effective midfield limited a dangerou'
Wildcat offense to 17 spots on goal.
The Wolveirnes should be proud of
their showing against the best team in
the country. But this year the field
hockey team, no matter who or how
well it plays, seems destined to come
up short.
R S A

2011 Student Activities Building
To allow stufficient time for processing and payment, students applying for Guaranteed
Student Loans for fall/winter or winter-only should submit their applications to the Office of

"An Attempt at a Theology
for the Reborn State of Israel"
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 8:00 P.M.
ITN TT..T . AT TTTTOR TT TM

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