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October 21, 1985 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-21

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Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 21, 1985

Health director: 'U'

needs education on AIDS

By MARK WEISBROT
The University community is suf-
fering from a lack of accurate infor-
mation about the risks of contracting
AIDS, according to Dr. Caesar
Briefer, the director of University
Health Services.
"The evidence is quite clear, and
the recommendation of the CDC (Cen-
ter for Disease Control) is quite clear,
that AIDS is not a highly contagious
disease," Briefer said. "It is not
communicated by casual contact."
ACQUIRED IMMUNE Deficiency
Syndrome is a deadly disease that at-
tacks the body's immune system,
rendering it defenseless to a variety of
infections.
Homosexual men, hemophiliacs,
and recipients of blood transfusions
are among those considered to be
"high risk" groups.
Briefer said that AIDS is transmit-
ted primarily through semen, with
some cases of transmission through
blood products or sharing of
hypodermic needles by drug users.
SEXUAL promiscuity leads to in-
creased risks of contracting the
disease, Briefer cautioned. Condoms
provide the most protection against
the disease of any form of contracep-
tion, he added.
There are many popular miscon-
ceptions about AIDS, Briefer said, at-
tributing these to what he called a
"mixed message" that is present in
the media.
While most of the news articles on
AIDS have pointed out that the
disease is not transmitted through
casual contact, there has been a ten-
dency to emphasize unusual cases and
the more ambiguous statements

made about it, Briefer said.
"I THINK there is a sufficient
amount of data from people who have
lived in the same household with
people who had AIDS, family mem-
bers ... as well as people in the area
of health care who have taken care of
people who are afflicted with this
illness, to demonstrate that casual
contact is not sufficient to transmit
the disease," Briefer continued.
"I think the emphasis should be
placed on being much more prudent in
your choice of sexual partners and
using appropriate forms of contracep-
tion," said Briefer, referring to both
heterosexual and homosexual
relationships.
The University is currently
preparing a pamphlet on AIDS that
should be published in about a week,
and will send out a letter informing
students about its availability, Briefer
said.
THE UNIVERSITY will also
distribute the pamphlet throughout
the dormitories and other University
departments, he said. There will
probably be some programs for the
housing staff, Briefer said, so that
they can act as a resource for studen-
ts' questions.
"I think the more people that are
award of the facts, rather than fiction,
the better off we're going to be," he
said.
Judy Levy, a member of the
University's Task Force on Sexual
Orientation, said she believes
ignorance will breed unfounded fears
and lead to harassment and
discrimination against gays and
lesbians.

"THERE ARE two epidemics here:
A health care epidemic, and an
epidemic of fear," she said.
"A lot of what I call 'aids-baiting'
happens on the job - to people who do
not have AIDS but are gay. As a
lesbian, who's the least likely of any
population to have AIDS, I have ex-
perienced harassment pertaining to
AIDS," Levy said.
She said she would like to see a lot
more educational efforts by the
University "to combat this fear and
harassment," as well as an AIDS
hotline to answer any questions that
people might have.
IN ADDITION, Levy said, the
University should formulate an ex-
plicit policy which states that people
with AIDS or people who test positive
for the AIDS virus will not be
discriminated against or prevented
from attending classes or working for
the University.
Levy attributes much of the fear of
aids to widespread fears of
homosexuality. "You add a deadly
disease to an enormous amount of
fear and homophobia, and it just
blows up."
Levy, a University Hospitals em-
ployee, said the University needs to
make a special effort to educate
health care workers who she says
have not been adequately informed on
the issue.
SUCH TRAINING should deal not
only with the health aspects but also
the emotional aspects of the disease,
Levy said, "so that doctors and other
health care workers do not try to im-
pose their values concerning gay
sexuality."
The Center for Disease Control lists

14,125 known cases of AIDS in the
United States since the virus was first
identified in 1981. OF these, 92 cases
are from Michigan and three are from
Washtenaw County, according to
state health department statistics.
University Hospitals is currently

treating "one case and one potential
case" of AIDS, according to David
Friedo, the hospital's public affairs
coordinator.
"We're seeing more and more
cases," Friedo said. The hospital has
treated 10 people with AIDS since

April, and about 30 in the last two
years.
No AIDS cases have been identified
at University Health Services as of
October, according to Briefer.

Regents stand behind content,
of 'Star Warls.'resolution

*4

(Continued from Page 1)
for all the differing opinions to be considered. She said this
was lacking in the regents' decision.
Noting that the University was the first scene of teach-
ins on Vietnam, she commended students who organized a
forum on SDI earlier this month.
Regents Nellie Varner (D-Detroit) and Paul Brown (D-
Petosky) also said they regretted the lack of discussion of
the resolution, but maintained that the resolution had
been misinterpreted.
"ON MY PART, I did not approve of any particular type
of research," Varner said. The resolution merely suppor-
ted the right of academic freedom, to let the individual
researcher decide whether to take part in the controver-
sial project she said.
Brown agreed, but added that "a resolution of that sort
should have been debated more extensively." He said that
the regents felt unanimously in favor of the resolution and
did not want to give faculty the impression that they were
hesitant in supporting academic freedom by discussing it
or postponing action to discuss it more later.
Brown said when the resolution was proposed by Regent
Deane Baker (R-Ann Arbor), "we felt it required an af-
firmative or negative answer."
IN ANOTHER action, Sheila Creth, chair of the Com-
mittee on the Economic Status of the Faculty, (CESF),
said the University has made gains in increasing the
buying power of faculty.
"Despite this gain, the CESF feels strongly that the gap
between peer institutions and UM faculty salaries must be
closed if we are to retain faculty, attract faculty, and not
see a serious morale problem develop among the
faculty," she said.
"In addition, there continues to be concern among the
faculty with the distribution of the dollars in the salary
program," Creth said. "One concern is that the funds are
insufficient to provide both merit and market adjustmen-

ts, and as a result some faculty are receiving a dispropor
tionate share of the salary program relative to merit."
FOR EXAMPLE, faculty in the business school receive
an average salary of $58,000, while faculty in the.
education school receive an average of $38,000, Frye said
This is because competition is greater for business faculty
with the private sector than it is for education faculty, he
said.
Regent Power defended the board's concern for the
drop in salaries, saying that it had implemented several
initiatives to increase money spent on faculty salaries.
For example, the University is reallocating $20 million
over five years from lower priority areas such as the
eucation, art, and natural resources schools to higher
priority areas such as faculty salaries.
THE "FIVE-YEAR Plan" will have shifted $10 million
more for faculty salaries by the time the plan ends in 1987.
University Vice President for Academic Affairs Billy
Frye blamed the decline in faculty salaries to a lack of
state support during the 1970s to early 1980s. Money from
the state during that time dropped from supporting 60.7
percent of the University's budget in 1975 to 47.5 percent in
1983.
Frye said it would take between $5 to 8 million to make
up for the backlog in salaries.
The regents also on Friday named John Forsyth
executive director of the University of Michigan
Hospitals. Forsyth is currently chief operating officer of
the hospitals in charge of the daily operation of thel
hospitals.
Forsyth said he didn't expect any changes in the
hospital.
After the regents' meeting Friday, administrators and
regents watched a videotape of the Today Show's Thur-
sday special higher education program which featured
the University and Brown University.

HousinE experts Lather

(Continued from Page 1)
"Ann Arbor is way behind other
cities in creating affordable housing,''
Peterson said. "The biggest problem
is proving to others that there is really
an affordable housing crisis."
OTHER speakers addressed issues
as housing discrimination and federal
housing subsidies.
Mayor Pierce said housing
discrimination today has taken a dif-
ferent form, although it still exists.

C.~7 A

"In the 1960s, classified ads for
homes in the Ann Arbor News still
carried 'whites only,' ** Pierce said.
"Now, however, peoplle discriminate
against those with ADC grants or
federal rent subsidies," even though it
is illegal under an Ann Arbor ordinan-
ce.
Margo Nichols, executive director
of Student Legal Services, blamed the
Reagan administration for the cuts to

social programs such as housing.
"Just hanging on to what we hvae
now is a battle," Nichols said. "It's
becoming increasingly difficult to
realize everyone's right to affordable
housing."
Workshop subjects covered such
topics. as tenant legislation in the
Midwest, specialized housing needs
and the homeless, cold weather
problems, and women and housing.

)

I

Dil

71ft- I iilI

....:

LOST & FOUND
LOST! Yellow folder at GRAD 11:00 p.m. 10/16
by copiers. REWARD for Return!sCall 769-3159.
89A1024
LOST: Brown leather jacket. "Mark Shale" label.
Reward $25. No questions asked. 764-1838.
77A1025

FOR SALE

FOR RENT

PERSONAL

HELP WANTED

FOR SALE

FOR SALE - Exercise bicycle. Vitamaster
w/speedometer and odometer. $55 cash. Call
763-2974. 44B1021
HADASSAH RUMMAGE SALE Sunday, Oct. 20
11:30-5:00 p.m. Monday Oct. 21 8:30-2:30 p.m.
Fall and winter clothing, household, sport items,
toys, records, books. 75B1021
'80 DATSUN 210-Red, new tires. Runs like a
dream. $2000 or best offer. 769-6462. 68B1024
'75 FIAT WAGON, fwd, manual, fold-down plus
original rack for cargo but compact on A'
streets, reliable starter.$450 or offer. 761-7235.
61B1023
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

ROOM for male in furnished 1-bedroom A CUT ABOVE HAIR DESIGN - Special $5 off
apartment on Church. $190./month includes heat, any service, first visit only. Call 662-2544 for
water. Private parking. 668-4642. 46C1022 appointment. cFtc

....vv ... ... j,,.. ....p....... .. .
t

DORM DOINGS

19" COLOR TV $175.663-78201year old. 82B1025
1980 PINTO - 82,000 miles, good condition,
cassette, 4-speed. $1250.00 or best offer. 572-1314
after 5:00. 73B1024
LEASE FOR SALE - Women's double in
South Quad. 764-7621, Sheila. 69B1024

DAILY CROSSWORD PUZZLE
Edited by Trude Michel Jaffe

MALE DOUBLE Alice Lloyd for sale Winter
term 764-6919. 40D1021
TARDA' presents its annual science fiction and
fantasy costume ball Saturday October 26th at
8:30, in the Anderson Room of the Michigan
Union. Admission with costume $2, without
costume $3. 83D1025
VAN TYNE: Congratt ations on your soccer win.
The Bears rule and now with their new 325 pound
fullback they will dominate. - MEZ NCD1O21
TIRED OF
DIRTY DISHES?
Then consider the advantages of on-campus
dining in UM Residence Halls ...
" THREE MEAL PLANS TO CHOOSE FROM!1
* TEN CONVENIENT LOCATIONS1
" SPECIAL DISCOUNTS WITH
ENTREE PLUS!
We have a meal plan for your style. Come to
113 SAB (the Entree Office) today. OR phone
763-432. cDtc

CONFIDENTIAL
INEXPENSIVE
GYNECOLOGICAL CARE
Planned Parenthood
3100 Professional Dr., Ann Arbor
(near Washtenaw & Huron Pkwy.)
973-0710 cFtc
STUDENT SERVICES
MUSIC FOR your party ' lights - DJ. Call
Music Concepts: 665-6725. 45G1022
RESUMES - written - also word processed or
typeset; coverletters, too. 662-4530. cGtc
ACE Word processing, student discount.
769-9069. 21G1120
GMAT/LSAT. Stanley Kaplan Educational
Center, class to prepare for January GMAT exam
begins October 24th. Classes to prepare for
December LSAT exam begin October 27th and
November 6th. Call 662-3149. cG1023
ACCURACY INK
Editing/Word Processing
Reasonable Rates. 971-4139.
cGtc

WANTED: Experienced banquet waiters.
Part-time. 971-1386. 25H1024
WANTED BUS BOYS. 1345 Washtenaw. Sigma
Kappa 761-4781. 52H1022
WANTED: MODEL for glamour art photography
for possible commercial reproduction. Also
make-up artist. Call for an interview 769-5745.
28H1101
TUTOR WANTED: EECS 370 (ECE 365). Call
761-6589. 54H1022
PIZZA DELIVERY DRIVERS. Car required.
Part time, one or two nights/week. Hourly
wage, tips and mileage. Apply in person Omega
Pizza, 101 Washtenaw Place, near U of M
Hospital. 56H1029
TELEPHONE & COUNTER HELP. Lunch
hour Monday thru Friday, & Sunday 4:30 p.m. -
9 p.m. Apply in person Omega Pizza near U
of M Hospital. 57H1029
NURSING researchers need healthy volunteers,
ages 30-55, for non-invasive study effects of
straining on blood flow and pressure. On
completion of the study, participants will receive
$20. For further information call 763-6122.
20H1021
NEED MONEY?
STUDENT FOOD SERVICE JOBS
AVAILABLE. FLEXIBLE HOURS
$3.90 to $4.40 PER HOUR
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
Phone or stop by the Food Service office at:
East Quad 7630136 Mosher Jordan 764-2111
South Quad 764-0169 Stockwell 764-1194
West Quad 764-1111 Alice Lloyd 764-1183
Bursley 764-1121 Couzens 764-2142
Markley 764-1151 Law Quad 764-1115

ACROSS
1 Health resort
4 Hebrew
measure
8 Proscription
1i Gad
12 Decree
13 Othello's
ensign
14 Sky bear
15 Win approval
17 Davis and
Midler
19 Coquettes
20 Dash unit
22 Old or young
follower
23 Stroll about
25 Ukrainian folk
dance
29 Port of S Iraq
30 Styles
32 Suffix denoting
sugar
33 Umpires' calls
34 July forecast
35 Paris suburb
36 "A Chorus
Line" hit
37 Shocked
responses
38 Plays the chips
39 A Dolly
41 Divisions
43 Part of REO
45 Dancer's
master
46 Verses, in
Versailles
48 Coddles
51 Stamped, in a
way
54 Southwestern
#A k

5 Sail support
6 Curved letters
7 Fixed a picture
8 Belfry
residents?
9 Sweet sixteen,
e.g.
10 Connecting
word
11 Apply friction
12 Surprise ending
13 Rhone feeder
16 Consumers
18 Heating vessel
21 Fictional uncle
23 Feature of 1
Across
24 Wins handily
26 Main mailman
27 Fools
28 "Ivories"
29 Betty of car-
toon fame
31 Jockey's collec-
tion
34 Like some craft
items
1 2 3
11
14
17 18

35 Guide
37 Folklore image
38 Japanese
native
40 Gear part
42 Like a Jack-of-
all-trades
44 Father Junipero

46 Attention-
getters
47 Schusses
49 Hard to hold
50 Concorde
51 Part of EAP
52 Before cake or
meal
53 Isleof-

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - ALL KINDS - Fast, efficient service.
Reasonable rates. Laurie, 973-1592. cJtc
VOICE LESSONS by experienced Broadway
singer-actress, NYC teacher. Call Joyce Godfrey
761-7667. 51J1022
Papers/Resumes/Coverletters
EXECU-TOPS Word Processing 663-7158
cJtc
THE NEW SCHOOL OF PIANO
First lesson complimentary. 994-0371
cJ1211
A-1 TYPING - On Campus. Professional Rush
Service Available. 668-8898. cJ1211
SANDI'S TYPING & WORD PROCESSING
***20% Off 1st paper (with this ad)*
Fast & accurate. Papers, briefs, resumes, letters,
theses. Campus pick-up & delivery. 426-5217.
cJtc
REALM'S
LSAT COURSE
November 12-December 5
Reasonable Rates.
665-3579 70J1109
ACCUTYPE y
WORD PROCESSING
Resumes, Papers, Cover Letters, Etc
Complete Secretarial Service
Available Same Day Service
761-5050
cJtc
SITUATIONS
WANTED
NEEDED - Foster Homes for Vietnamese
Refugees. (313) 579-0302. 48P1022

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
B E S 0MS POR T IA
O RA NG E S OR LEA N S
R OBE RT A D U GON GS
E TA S A L S DA T RA
D I 0R TO0R E G RA Y
O C TET I LS B RU TE
M A HA RA NI F RA ME D
S A T INS I R RIT A TE
CHRNED A A TI L DEVNEL
I MA S TOR M ED R A M
S A B BATH P RE F A CE
M IL IT IA H A LOG E N
S CE N IC S A GE ST
10/21/85

GREEK GAB

HELP WANTED

DELTA TAU DELTA,
We had a great time at your carry-in on
October 17. Thanks for inviting us!
Love, SIGMA KAPPA
NCE1021
WHAT SORORITY stole Sammies and ZBT
composites the night of 10-17-85? A tradition
returns. NCE1021

PERSONAL

M 4 5. 6 1
12
19

7 8 9 1 0
16
25 26 27 28

ADOPTION: Caring, accomplished woman
(Ph.D. - public health) hopes to adopt infant.
Offers loving, stimulating, stable home; excellent
education; supportive family and friends. Will
pay all expenses legally permitted. Call
301-530-9180 collect. 31F1025
STUDY IN PEACE and quiet - get ear plugs at
the VILLAGE APOTHECARY, 1112 S. University.
cFtc
HELP NEW STUDENTS OR THEIR PARENTS:
Be a Summer Orientation Leader. Applications
available in 3000 Michigan Union or call
764-6290 for more information. 33F1028
HAPPY 21st BIRTHDAY RAY! ! Hope you blow
out all of your birthday candles. I'll be by to
give you your spankings. M.E.L. NCF1021
DO YOU SEND VIDEOS to friends or relatives
overseas? Convert them to PAL or SECAM at
Video Conversions International. Call for special

PRIVATE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL now
accepting appointment for part-time physical
education teacher. 668-6770. 86H1025
SECRETARY - Full or part time needed for new
business Ann Arbor area. 668-2435. 87H1023
FULL or PART TIME for new moving and
storage company Ann Arbor area. 668-2435.
88HI022
DO YOU HAVE PIMPLES OR ACNE? Earn
$75-$100.UVolunteers needed to test medication for
facial acne. Office visits and medication are
provided free to eligible participants. You must
have moderately severe acne (12 pimples or more.)
$754100 paid at the successful completion of
the 12-14 week studies. Call UM Department
of Dermatology Research 763-5519, M-F, 9-4, for
further details. 81H1025
AIRLINES NOW HIRING. Reservationists
stewardesses and ground crew positions
available. Calli1-619-565-1657 for details. 24 hrs.
58H1025
MEAL JOB AVAILABLE. Enjoy your meals
in a Sorority. Positions open for reliable men.
Some weekends included. 761-7553. 43H1022
CAB DRIVERS WANTED. Flexible hours.
663-4545 days or nights. 42H1028
STUDENT MAGICIAN NEEDED November 2nd.
$50 for evening. Please call 764-0897. 39H1028
DEVELOPING THAT
RESUME?
Th Mie,,va nna. scarn ~nni

GOING

THANKSGIVING
NEW YORK
FLIGHTS FROM $98
LaGuardia and Newark, Great Places Travel
Consultants, U of M Union Mall. Call immed-
iatdly 994-4777. cKtc
Use Daily Classifieds
MISC ELLAN EOUS

PLACES

TICKETS

23

21 22
24 2
30 31
34

DESPERATELY WANTED. OSU/Michiga
football tickets. 973-9582. cQc
ABSOLUTE top dollar paid for UM football tick-
ets. Call 973-6327. cQtc
NEEDED: 6 Ohio State tickets. Top dollar paid.
764-8627. 65Q1023
WANTED: 4 seats together, Mich-Indiana game
(call Bill, 485-4111) 59Q1025

f X35 1

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