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October 21, 1985 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-21

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Ninety-six years of editorialfreedom

Vol. XCVI - No. 33

Copyright 1985, The Michigan Daily

Ann Arbor, Michigan - Monday, October 21, 1985

Eight Pages

lawks boot
Hue, 12-10
Iowa stays atop of the perch

By JOE EWING
IOWA CITY - Well, at least Iowa
didn't score a touchdown Saturday in
its nationally televised number one-
number two showdown with
Michigan. But the Hawkeyes cer-
tainly did everything else against the
Wolverines.
Iowa dominated the offensive game
throughout the contest and got four
field goals from Rob Houghtlin to pull
out a 12-10 victory. In fact, the
Hawkeyes were in control so much
that it seemed unusual that the
Wolverines led most of the way and
that Houghtlin's 29-yarder with no
time left was the difference.
ORIGINALLY, the game had been
touted as a bitter battle between
Iowa's top-ranked offense and
Michigan's nearly invincible defense.
But in the end it was Michigan's lack
of punch on offense that told the story.
Like in its first five contests, the
Michigan defense held tough deep in
its own territory, not allowing the
Hawkeyes to penetrate the endzone.
The Wolverines still have not allowed
a touchdown in ten straight quarters.
However, the Michigan offense
sagged, and didn't hold on to the ball
long enough, allowing Iowa the time
and opportunity to gain 422 yards and

its four field goals.
"I think in this ball game our defen-
se once again played well," said
Michigan head coach Bo Schem-
bechler. "But our offense failed to
control the ball. Iowa did a good job of
always maintaining field position, I
think the biggest problem for us was
offensively we never got good field
position."
THE HAWKS, led by quarterback
Chuck Long and running back Ronnie
Harmon, mounted a well-balanced at-
tack on the Wolverines and drove
deep into the Michigan zone six times
while hanging on to the ball for 38:05.
Earlier in the season the Wolverines
had specialized in shutting down their
opponents' big backs, but Harmon was
able to terrorize Michigan in two ways
- by rushing for 120 yards and by cat-
ching five passes for another 60
markers.
Long also had a big day, completing
26 of 39 aerials for 297 yards
as Harmon, Long's favorite targets
were wide receivers Bill Happel and
Scott Helverson, who combined for
15 catches worth 179 yards. Most of
those catches came on short out pat-
terns along the sidelines.
"WE NOTICED a tendency on their
defense," said Helverson, explaining

why Iowa was successful on the
sideline routes. "We noticed that
when we would send someone deep out
there, the cornerback would go with
him. So we tried to get another man in
behind him and it worked."
"We ran a lot of zones today and
they tried to find the weaknesses in
them," said Michigan safety Tony
Gant. "When you have the precision
routes their receivers were running
and a quarterback like Chuck Long,
you're going to find those
weaknesses."
"With Long and Harmon on the
same team, it makes it extremely dif-
ficult to shut them down," said
Schembechler. "We can and did keep
them out of the endzone, but you can't
shut them down."
LONG ALSO got quite a bit of time
to throw as his line kept Michigan's
pass rush, which usually is heavy, in
check for most of the game.
"This most definitely is the toughest
line we've faced yet," noted defensive
tackle Mark Messner.
NONETHELESS, while Iowa
moved the ball well and was within
striking distance of the endzone
several times, it never was able to
punch it over for a score due to
variety of circumstance. First and

Regents
defend
Star Wars
resolution
By KERY MURAKAMI
Three members of the University's
Board of Regents said Friday that
they regretted having passed last
month's resolution on 'Star Wars'
research on campus without having
discussed it more thoroughly.
The regents, however, defended the
content of the resolution, saying that
it merely restates the University's
current stance that it is up to the in-
dividual researcher to decide what
projects to undertake. They denied it
was an endorsement of President
Reagan's controversial strategic
Defense Initiative.
OPPONENTS of SDI say that the
resolution is an endorsement because
it "encourages" those who want to do
the research, and have complained
that they were not allowed to give
more input before the resolution was
passed.
Yesterday, Regent Sarah Power
(D-Ann Arbor) said the lack of
discussions "troubled" her.
Quoting from last month's speech
by Billy Frye, the University's vice
president for academic affairs, Power
said that in order to have harmony
within the academic community,
there must be mutual respect for all
points of view.
IN ADDITON, Power said there
must be time and an orderly process
See REGENTS, Page 6
tidwes I

Daily Photo by BRAD MILLS
Iowa placekicker Rob Houg.iin and holder Mark Vlasic display the thrill
of victory as Houghtlin connects on Saturday's game-winning, 29-yard
field goal against Michigan. Despite nagging leg injuries, Houghtlin
made four of his five field-goal attempts.

foremost was the Michigan defense,
which held the Iowa offense twice in-
side its own 25 and forced field goal at-
tempts, one of which was missed.
Linebacker Dieter Heren killed
another Hawkeye drive late in the third
quarter when he intercepted a Long

pass at the Michigan six.
The Hawkeyes got another blow
from the officials, who may have cost
them a touchdown on their first drive
of the second quarter when Helverson
was ruled out of bounds on a reception
See IOWA, Page 8
'U'hosts A

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Protest,
conference
target
AIDS

By MARK WEISBROT
About 70 protesters rallied in front
of the Federal Building on Liberty
Street Saturday afternoon to demand
increased funding for AIDS research,
as well as educational programs for
the public and social support services
for victims of the disease.
"AIDShas become surrounded by
political and social controversy which
has accompanied few other diseases,"
said Dr. Lorna Rodriguez, addressing
the protesters. "This controversy is
not caused by the disease itself. The
controversy is the result of the
political and social position of the
group of people which happened to
become AIDS' first victims in the U.S.

Because of the association between
AIDS and homosexuality in the public
mind, AIDS has come to be thought as
of a 'gay disease.' "
RODRIGUEZ assailed this notion
as "misleading and dangerous'
because it leads to the idea that gays
are to blame for AIDS, or that
heterosexuals are not as susceptible
to the disease.
A sign held by one of the protesters
said "AIDS: Attack the disease, not
gay men and lesbians." Protesters
chanted "Money for health care, not
for warfare" and "3,5,7,9, havings
AIDS is not a crime.'
According to Rodriguez, ithe AIDS,
virus is believed to have originated in

the green monkey in Africa. It was
transmitted through monkey bites to
the heterosexual human population
there, affecting about equal numbers
of men and women. From Africa,
AIDS apparently spread to Haiti, and
may have spread to the U.S. via
tourists, she said. Here, it first spread
among homosexual and bisexual men
and intravenous drug users before en-
tering the heterosexual population.
RODRIGUEZ called for the
establishment of a patient advocacy
system such as that which exists for
dialysis patients and abused children.
Such a system is needed, she said, to
enforce the legal rights of people with
See PROTESTERS, Page 2

Housing Conference

By JOSEPH PIGOTT
Housing officials and politicians
from over 10 Michigan cities and
several Midwestern states came to
the University this weekend to ex-
change ideas on how to make housing
more affordable to lower and middle-
income households.
Activities kicked off Friday evening
in the MLB with the showing of
Poletown lives, a film about a poor
Detroit neighborhood's fight for their
homes with General Motors Corp. The
conference concluded Saturday after
daylong housing workshops and a
dinner reception.

ORGANIZED by the Community
Housing Coalition, the National
Tenants Union and the National
Housing Institute, conference
speakers included state Rep. Perry
Bullard (D-Ann Arbor), Ann Arbor
Mayor Ed Pierce, City Councilman
Lowell Peterson, and Don Campbell
- U.S. Sen. Don Riegle's represen-
tative from the Senate subcommittee
on Housing and Urban Affairs.
Peterson (D-First Ward) said this
city's biggest problem in providing
low income housing is giving evidence
that there is a need for it.

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Aparth teaclimin ca& for action

See HOUSING, Page 6

By CHERYL WISTROM
Personal accounts of life in South Africa under
apartheid and of experiences in the struggle
against racism both in that country and here in the
United States highlighted the "Teach-In Against
Apartheid and Racism" held at the University this
weekend.
Speakers at the three-day long conference
organized by the Free South Africa Coordinating
Committee (FSACC) included Motatlepula
.. Chabaku, a South African exile and former leader
of the women's resistance to pass laws implemen-
ted in South Africa in the 1950's.
CHABAKU, who has earned an undergraduate
and three master's degrees during the nine years
she has been in the United States, has been con-
tinually harassed by U.S. immigration officers
and said that she "can't get a green pass in this
country."
"If I was a Communist from the Soviet Union,
I'd get it," she said, pointing to the numerous
Soviet exiles given asylum in the United States. "I
have no citizenship anywhere in the world."
Chabaku said that while she appreciates the
freedom and opportunity that she has found since
being here, "America has to watch out."
"IF YOU DO nothing about South Africa, and
you have a right to, South Africans are going to
liberate themselves," she said. "We're going to
remember you when the revolution is over."
Evidence of the role that the United States has
played in supporting the apartheid regime could
be found in the passbook that Chabaku carried
with her. This book is the identification that black
South Africans must carry with them at all times.
TODAY-
Most writer
ST F 'TOO MANY cnnks snnil the broth then m

Her passbook photograph was taken using IBM
machinery and printed on Polaroid film. Since the
time her photograph was taken, Polaroid has
withdrawn from selling film for this purpose. The
pictures are now printed on Kodak film.
CHABAKU SAYS she believes that students in
the United States 'can help to end apartheid
because of the effect they have had on similar
struggles in the United States.
Sonny Venketrathnam, a South African activist
of Indian descent who spent 7 years in prison
there, agreed that any help given to the anti-apar-
theid movement by the United States must come
from the "common American people."
"WE ARE NOT looking for help from the
American government. They are in cahoots with
business interests," he said.
Barbara Ransby, a University graduate student
who helped organize the teach-in, said of the pur-
poses behind holding the conference: "One is to
educate people, but the other is to activate
people."
"We feel very strongly that the anti-apartheid
movement being built in this country right now
will have a powerful impact on South Africa," she
said.
"APARTHEID IS not going to end spon-
taneously," said Tanaquil Jones, a student from
Columbia University who was instrumental in
organizing protests there, including a three-week
blockade of a campus building that led to the
recent decision of Columbia's Board of Regents to
divest their holdings in corporations doing

business in South Africa.
Jones noted that since the Columbia protest at
least 26 colleges and universities have partially or
totally divested. She said she believes that studen-
ts all over the country can benefit from what they
learned.
"It's a microcosmic representation of the
nationwide struggle for divestment," Jones said of
the Columbia struggles.
LEADERS OF the anti-apartheid struggle here
say they believe that their immediate efforts must
focus directly on the University.
"The University is trying to find a compromise
around an issue in which I think there is none,"
Ransby said, referring to the decision of the
regents to divest 99 percent of their original in-
vestments in corporations that are involved in
-South Africa.
The University is holding onto the 1 percent of
South African-related stocks to protest a state law
which forces them to divest all of their holdings.
The regents argue that the law violates the
University's autonomy.
"Their lawsuit is an insult to the people who are
struggling," said state Rep. Perry Bullard (D-Ann
Arbor), who believes that the University should
divest the last $500,000 of its original holdings.
"Sometime in the next year or so the media will
stop focusing attention on South Africa," Bullard
said, adding that it is up to us to tell them that
"it's still reality. . . we demand that you continue
to look at it."

Tea time

Elizabeth Yoon writes "Matthew" in Korean on rice paper at the Martha
Cooke International Tea on Friday. The event also featured a fashion
show.

tax incentives to peace through education. Its con-
tributors included a man in his 80s and a boy of 11,
along with professional writers, secretaries, gover-
nment officials, housewives, students and a bus driver.
Roy Fox, the university's coordinator of composition
who organized the marathon, said the stunt had a
cmamti ninnen "ra mnwnt tn anhance nuhlic

(R-Texas), says he has the best accommodations in the
nation's capital at the Rayburn House Office Building.
"When I first got here in January, my staff and wife
encouraged me to try an apartment," he told the
Dallas Morning News last Wednesday. "It was incon-
venient and it cost me a lot of time. I always had to
inln n ot 11.- In m " tn octch tn the 1 t metrn fnr

-INSIDE-
CENTER RING: Opinion looks at Washington's
budget balancing act. See Page 4.
BULLDOGGED: Sports reviews Michigan

wnat

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