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October 15, 1985 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-15

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Page 8 - The Michigan Daily -- Tuesday, October 15, 1985
'M' tries to best

By DARREN JASEY
If you want to get a good look at
every midwestern volleyball team
ranked in the top 20, the CCRB is the
place to be this week. That's where
the Wolverines will face the 15th-
ranked Broncos of Western Michigan
tonight at 7 p.m. and Purdue and
Illinois, ranked 9th and 12th respec-
tively, this weekend.
If those rankings are not enough to
give the Wolverines the willies,
Michigan coach Barb Canning is
worried about the effects of her team's
most recent experience, a two-loss
road trip to Iowa and Northwestern
last weekend.
ALTHOUGH the loss to North-
western occurred Saturday, Canning
said her team may not have had
enough time to recover. "It might be a
problem getting mentally prepared,"
said Canning. "It was a tiring road
trip and they might use that as an ex-
cuse."
They might not need one, because
the Broncos come in with a 13-1
overall record (9-0 in the MAC), with
their only loss coming against first-
ranked Stanford. They return five
starters from a team that made it to
the second round of the 28-team NCAA
tournament last year.
Western's student coach, Jeff
Powell, calls Michigan a short team.

"They should not be terribly tough ...
though they'll probably be fired up,"
he said.
POWELL downplayed the impor-
tance of the Michigan game by saying
that this weekend's Toledo and
Bowling Green contests are impor-
tant in the MAC standings, and that
next weeks Northwestern game is one
that Western is shooting for.
Canning knows Michigan will have
to execute well to beat the taller, well-
skilled Broncos. And though the

Western
Wolverines might not win, she likes
the team's competitive spirit. "I
wouldn't give in to Western," said
Canning. "It will be a good match if
we're playing well."
Western is definitely playing well,
according to Powell. He says he is
pleased with the way the Broncos
have "been improving all year."
They looked especially sharp in their
weekend victories over Ball State and
Miami (Ohio), according to Powell.
WESTERN is led by All-American
candidate Sarah Powers, who last
year was instrumental in the Broncos
defeat of Michigan at Kalamazoo.
"Sarah's just consistently strong,"
said Canning.
Powell calls Powers the "big hitter"
in their 6-2 offense.
At this point in the season the
Wolverines have been somewhat of a
disappointment, with records of 9-9
overall and 1-5 in the Big Ten. Can-
ning, though, thinks the team has
worked hard to be competitive and
that a win this week is not out of the
question. Maybe new uniforms she
handed out to the team after yester-
day's practice will help.
After the dust clears at the CCRB
this week, Michigan can look forward
to a visit from cross-state rival
Michigan State next week, but by then
the poor Wolverines will probably be
out of breath.

By MARK BOROWSKY
H OCKY GOALIES are said to have a recurring
nightmare in which every time something passes
them - the mailman, a car on the road, Fido on the
way to the water dish - a red light goes off in their
head and they get pulled from the game of life.
Hockey coaches have a recurring nightmare in which
his team outplays the other - outshoots, outhustles,
outchecks - and still manages to lose because the
goalie thinks the puck will explode on impact with his
chest protector.
In the same nightmare, the other goalie decides he's
Ken Dryden for a night, stopping everything in sight.
Welcome to the nightmare, Bill Davidge.
Davidge is the first year hockey coach of the Miami
(OH) Redskins, and in the two weekend games with
Michigan, Miami played even with, often better than,
the Wolverines, but still managed to lose both games
by a cumulative score of 13-3.
"We played well," emphasized Davidge Saturday
night after Michigan stuffed the Redskins, 7-3. "We
outshot them, we dominated, we didn't get any
goaltending."
Fortunately, Michigan did. Friday night Tim Makris
stopped 18 shots in recording his first career shutout,
and Saturday night, freshman Bob Lingren stopped 18
shots in the second period to net his first collegiate vic-
tory. Lindgren faced 38 shots in all, including
numerous breakaways, two-on-one's and three-on-
two's thanks to a porous Wolverine defense.
Meanwhile, Brent Smith and Tim Hall, Miami's
goalkeepers, played well at times but overall looked
lost. Hall in particular played as if "Sieve" was tatooed
on the back of his jersey. Hall stopped 4 out of 7 shots in
the first period, 2 out of 5 in the second before being
pulled in favor of Smith.
Worse, the goals weren't pretty. They didn't even
have a good personality. Hall was pulled after Jeff Ur-

Blue Lines

.#
, ",
I

Miami's nightmare. ..
e.is dream for 'M
ban's goal at 14:09 of the second period, Urban having
managed to score from an angle almost behind the
goal. Urban appeared to be centering the puck, but it
bounced off the back of Hall's left leg and into the net.
Hardly a memorable goal, except to Hall, who may be
having some nightmares about it.
"I'm not 100% pleased with the way they played,"
said Wolverine head coach Red Berenson after Satur-
day night's ugly victory. "Sometimes you win and you
don't deserve to win. I don't think scores were indic-
ative of the games, but we put the puck in the net.
"I thought we gave up too much tonight. I thought we
were looser defensively than last night and we have to
tighten up on that. We can't expect our goalkeepers to
have to make those kind of saves."
Lindgren, however, wasn't complaining. "It was a
normal game for me," said Lingren, a soft-spoken
freshman from Minneapolis. Not only did Lindgren
face 19 shots in the second period, but half of those
were in front of or around the net. "If it was a great
game, it would have been a shutout."
It was a shutout Friday night, when a tougher defen-
se only allowed 18 shots on goal the entire game and
Tim Makris stopped them all in Michigan's 6-0 win,
earning player-of-the-game honors in the process.
"I kept saying to myself it will happen sooner or
later," said Makris of the shutout that eluded him
before. Friday's was a game in which goalkeeping
played a prominent role, as the score was tied at zero
until the third period when Michigan exploded for five
goals in four-and-a-half minutes.
Michigan then, comes out of its first weekend of
hockey 2-0, goalies saving everything in sight, and the
offense scoring from angles unbeknownst to the game.
One wonders if the Wolverines can keep up such feats
of daring-do, but such feats are the substance coaches'
dreams are made of.

Canning
...rough road ahead

Wolverine
wins Free
Press
marathon

By JON HARTMANN
Liz Watch says she did the Detroit
Free Press International Marathon as
a training run: "I did it on a whim,"
she said. "You know, whatever hap-
pens, happens. Three weeks ago, I
wasn't in shape."
But the Elementary-Education
senior from Royal Oak trained hard
enough to win Sunday's race,
finishing with a time of 2:51:49. It was
her first marathon victory and her
second best time ever; she took fourth
with a 2:48 in the 1982 Philadelphia
marathon.
WATCH HAS run against stiffer
competition than the "low-key field"
which she said turned out for the Free
Press race. She qualified for the 1984

Olympic marathon, but had to with-
draw because of a leg injury.
Watch said she didn't run well as a
member of the 1984 and 1985 Michigan
track teams, preferring to run on the
roads. Injuries were partially respon-
sible for her taking much of 1984 off.
"It was getting to a point where I
didn't enjoy it" she said. But "after
four or five months," she said, she
missed running: "I paid for it (not
running). I'll never do it again."
Watch plans to run another
marathon this spring and try out for
the '88 Olympic team. Although she
may not always be able to manage
her current 60-70 miles a week, Watch
is determined to keep up her training.

4

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Tickets available at Ticket World in
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CALL 763-8587
Sponsors: Hillel, U-M English Dept.,
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4

Daily Photo by DAN HABIB
Miami defenseman Rob Robinson (21) helps goalie Brent Smith clear the puck against Michigan last weekend.
The Wolverines swept the weekend series by scores of 6-0 and 7-3.

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