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October 11, 1985 - Image 17

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-11
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ENTERTAINMENTS

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MCI

reporter Mel Gibson and, his
diminutive photographer-guide, ex-
cellently played by Linda Hunt, are
there to get the scoops and maybe
even the girl, Sigourney Weaver. Aud.
A,7 p.m., 9::15 p.m. $2.50.
WEDNESDAY
Bars and Clubs
The Ark - (761-1451) - Open Mike
Night, featuring the first twelve
acoustic performers who want to
show off.
Bird of Paradise - (662-8310) -
Fine jazz performed by the Ron
Brooks Trio.
The Blind Pig - (996-8555) - WC-
BN DJ Brian Tomsic grooves the
reggae sound.
The Earle - (944-0211) - The
sometimes smooth, sometimes sassy
piano stylings of Larry Manderville.
Mr. Flood's Party - (995-2132) -
Frantic rock classics by Bob Cantu
and Joyhouse.
Mountain Jack's - (665-1133) -
Tap your toes to the folk sounds of
comedian/musician Ron Coden.
The Nectarine Ballroom - (994-
5436) - Help benefit Ronald Mc-
Donald House - dance to the music
from WIQB DJ's.
Rick's American Cafe - (996-2747)
- Go crazy with the hard-edged rock
of 10,000 Maniacs.
U-Club - (763-2236) - Laugh track
is back with open mike comedy from
local funnymen.

Performance
Allen Ginsberg - Hillel Foun-
dation/University English Depar-
tment.
Ginsberg is regarded as America's
greatest living poet. He authored
works such as Kaddish, Don't Grow
Old, Howl, Wichita Vortex Sutra, and
Plutonium Ode. His poetry is well-
known for its diversity in topics. He is
probably even more widely-
recognized for his entertaining
readings of orations, chants, and
songs by both William Blake and him-
self. The reading begins at 8 p.m. at
Rackham Auditorium. Tickets are $5,
$3 for students. Call 663-3336.
Ann Arbor Dance Works - Univer-
sity Dance Department.
The new 8-member resident
professional dance company presents
its premiere performance. The
program will include a special inter-
pretation of Jose Limon's solo,
Chaconne, and also the work of
choreographers Gay De Langhe, Bill
DeYoung, Peter Sparling, and
Jessica Fogel. The program is ac-
companied by the scores of Chick
Corea, Frederic Rzewski, and the
department's artistic director, David
Gregory. The performance begins at
8 p.m. at the University Dance
Building. Tickets are $6, $5 for seniors
and students. For more info. call 763-
0450.
Campus Cinema
David Jolley - University Musical
Society
David Jolley, a member of the New
York Woodwind Quartet, will present
a French Horn recital. The perfor-
mance begins at 8 p.m. at the
Rackham Auditorium. Admission is
$100 EVERY TUESDAY ALL SEATS
$/ 0 ODHV S TT , RDYNG Br 0..U M~
COCOON ( 3GPG 13)KP Sw N
JAGGED EDGE (R)
10:05.12:10, 2:30, 4:40, 7:10.9:40
MAXIE (PG)
10:05,12:10, :30,4:40,710,.9:40
10:05, 1:00, 4:10, 7:00, 9:30
PLENTY (R)
10:05,12:10,2:30, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40
ST. ELMO'S FIRE (R)
10:00,12:152:30,4:45.7:15,9:30
BLACK CAULDRON (PG)
10:00,12:15,2:304:45
FRIGHT NIGHT (R)
GODS MUST BE CRAZY (PG)
10200,12:15, 2:30, 4:45,.7:15, 9:30
37 .MPE ,. i
SILVERADO -70 mmDolb ro - (sGA13
Last chance to see in 70mrm PG )
FOLLOW THAT BIRD (Gj
12:00, 2:15, 4:30
VOLUNTEERS (R)
12:00,2:15,9:30
COMPROMISING POSITIONS (R)
4:15, 7:00

free.Call 763-4726 for more infor-
mation.
Campus Cinema
The Mysterious Island (Lucien Hub-
bard, 1929) CG
Early science-fantasy effort is
remarkable for its production values
and imaginative design. Based on the
Jules Verne story. MLB 3, 7 p.m., 8:45
p.m. $2.
A Soldier's Story (Norman Jewison,
1984) MTF
Mediocre movie version of the
compelling stage play stars Howard
Rollins as a military attorney who
must find the truth behind the killing
of a black sergeant in the segregated
army of WWII. Mich., 7 p.m., 9:10
p.m. $3, $2.50/students, seniors.
Thunderball (Terence Young, 1965)
MED
Dated, though still exciting, early
Bond flick has our hero trying to find
two nuclear bombs that SPECTRE is
using to blackmail the world. Recen-
tly remade, again starring Sean Con-
nery, as the trivial Never Say Never
Again. Nat. Sci., 7 p.m. only
$2.50/single, $3/double.
You Only Live Twice (Lewis Gilbert,
1967) MED
Thrilling Bond adventure
realistically filmed in Japan. The bad
guys are doing evil things, so Connery
stops them. Nat. Sci., 9:15 p.m. only.
$2.50/single, $3/double.
,THURSDAY
Bars and Clubs
The Apartment - (769-4060) -
Louis Johnson Group hosts this
week's Jazz and Jam Session.
The Ark - (761-1451) - Get radical
with songwriter/activist Fred Hall.
Bird of Paradise - (662-8310) -
Bass, drums, and piano by the Ron
Brooks Trio.
The Blind Pig - (996-8555) - R&B
band Oroboros returns to Ann Arbor
after a lengthy absence.

The Earle - (994-0211) - Larry
Manderville's piano solos.
Main Street Comedy Showcase -
(996-9080) - Musical comedian Stuart
Mitchell.
Mr. Flood's Party - (995-2132) -
Jam to the feline sounds of Black Cat
Bone.
Mountain Jack's - (665-1133) -
The comedy and folk music styles of
Detroit's Ron Coden.
The Nectarine Ballroom - (994-
5436) - Eurodisco with DJ JacquiO.
Rick's American Cafe - (996-2747)
- The Buzztones with tunes from
their funk-rock EP Encyclopedia.
U-Club - (763-2236) - 1985 Soun-
dstage season begins, showcasing
local solo and small group acoustic
talent.
Performance
Air Supply - Office of Major Events
Australia's pop-rock sensation of
the '80s hits Ann Arbor with its suc-
cessful repertoire of top-40 love
ballads. Become lost in love with the
band's long string of sentimental
tunes, which include "All Out of
Love," "Every Woman in the World,"
and "Here I Am." The concert takes
off at 8 p.m. at the Hill Auditorium.
Ticket prices are $13.50-$15 at the
Michigan Union Ticket Office, Where
House Records, Hudson's, and all
other Ticketworld outlets. To charge
by phone, call 763-8587.
Ann Arbor Dance Works - University
Dance Department
Classic works and innovations in
choreography will be presented by the
department's newly-formed
professional company. Begins at 8
p.m. See Wednesday's listing.
Loot - Suspension Theater
Zany counterculture detective far-
ce. Show goes on at 8 p.m. See
Friday's listing.
Music at Mid Day - Michigan Union
Arts Program
Come hear University music
student Frederick Himebaugh,
baritone, and others in this special
recital. The program will begin at
12:30 p.m. at the Michigan Union
Pendleton Room. Admission is free.
Call 763-5900 for more information.
Campus Cinema
The American Friend (Wim Wenders,
1977) C2
American film noir goes head-to-
head with European notions of style
and substance as an artist is hired to
perform a contract killing. MLB 4,
HARRY'S
ARMY SURPLUS
ALL
SWEATERS
15%Io OFF
OFFER GOOD THROUGH
October 17, 1985
201 E. Washington
CORNER OF FOURTH AVE

6:45 p.m., 9:50 p.m. $2/single,
$3/double.
Chambre666 (Wim Wenders,1983) C2
Wim Wenders interviews several
fellow directors at the Cannes Film
Festival and discusses the future of
the motion picture form. MLB 4, 9
p.m. $2/single, $3/double.
Beverly Hills Cop (Martin Brest,
1984) MTF
Mildly amusing Eddie Murphy
vehicle that pits a street-wise Detroit
cop against a West Coast mobster and
the button-down attitudes of the Los
Angeles police. With a very good
cameo by Detroit police detective
Gilbert Hill. Mich., 7 p.m., 9:10 p.m.
$3, $2.50/students, seniors.
Dirty Harry (Don Siegel, 1971) MED
The best and only really intelligent
Dirty Harry movie and one of the last
true Westerns ever filmed. As Clint
Eastwood tries to track down a
sadistic killer, we see that society
both needs and must rid itself of his
kind of hero. Nat. Sci., 7:30 p.m.
$2.50/single, $3/double.
Magnum Force (Ted Post, 1973) MED
Sequel to Dirty Harry never equals
either the style or substance of the
original. All that's left is a regular
Eastwood action-pic set amid the
corruption of the California police.
Nat. Sci., 9:30 p.m. $2.50/single,
$3/double.
Straight Time (Ulu Grosbard, 1978)
Hill Street Cinema
Dustin Hoffman plays an ex-con
whose attempts to lead the good life
fail. Hill St., 7 p.m., 9 p.m. $2.
The Stunt Man (Richard Rush, 1980)
CG
Peter O'Toole mesmerizes both a
young man escaping from prison and
the cast and crew of an anti-war film
he is directing and for which he
recruits the ex-con to play stunt-man.
But the lines between the illusions of
real-life film-making and the reality
of his fictional role become quickly
confused. Aud. A, 7 p.m., 9:30 p.m. $2.
Furthermore
The Comet Halley: Once in a
Lifetime/Autumn Stars - University
Exhibit Museum
Presentations of fascinating space
phenomenons. Autumn Stars at 7
p.m., Comet Halley at 8:15. See
Saturday's listing.
International Night - Michigan
League
Opaa! Come join in the fun, food
and festivity of Greece and Turkey
Night. Celebrate your heritage or
sample the customs and cuisines. 5-
7:15 p.m. at the Michigan League.
Meals served in the cafeteria range
from $5-7 in price. Call 764-0446for
more information.
If you 're planning on enter-
taining the University community
let us know. Send a short descrip-
tion of the event including time,
date, price, ticket information,
and a phone number for infor-
mational requests to: Entertain-
ments c/o The Michigan Daily,
420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI
48109. Information must be
received three weeks prior to the
event.

Father
knows
best?
By Chris Lauer
Commando
Starring Arnold Schwarzenegger
H E ALMOST DID it. Arnold Sch-
warzenegger almost made me
like his new film, Commando. But it's
a trap. And carefully baited. With the
dry humor of James Bond, the animal
energy of Rambo, and a cute little girl
thrown in to smooth the edges, Com-
mando tries to be the best of
everything that's popular in movies
right now. But therein lies its in-
sanity.
The opening scenes - mostly
machinegun assaults - that land the
viewer in the middle of things are
tame enough to inoffensively whet
your appetite; stomach-felt horror
isn't a problem yet. The pre-credits
action is undoubtedly James Bond-
inspired, but where Bond usually
emerges in fairly creative, harmless
adventure, Commando has trumped
up TV-movie gore. No problem.
What follows is: ice cream, valen-
tine cards, fishing, and swimming -
all in the span of about 90 seconds.
This is the tender part of the movie.

Formulaic indeed, but how can you be
negative about the wonderful
relationship between a man and his
daughter. I wasn't exactly gushing
tears, but it worked: I was off guard.
Schwarzenegger's John Matrix is
unabashedly modeled after Rambo,
but with dialogue, much of it wry
James Bond-ish humor. More than
the transparent tenderness bit, it is
Schwarzenegger's surprisingly good
deadpan delivery that suckered me in
for the first half of the film. In fact,
Schwarzenegger is consistently on
target enough to out-Bond Bond,
whose humor has looked haggard and
wrinkled lately.
Besides just a couple of funny lines,
the first half of the movie contains
some highly entertaining action
scenes. The muscle man's escape from
a jet while it is taking off is exciting,
suspenseful, and all around pretty
damn cool.
The convolving of an airport
stewardess into the plot didn't take
too much imagination, but she and
Mr. Brawny-retired-mercenary get
into so much trouble - car chases, a
shopping mall melee, and an encoun-
ter with a mean Green Beret with a
magnum-sized gun - that her
character could hardly gather dust.
The trap was set.
What ensues in the last half of the
film is more senseless death than
Rambo ever dreamed of. Who wants
to applaud the kind of hero who will
rip the face off a bad guy? Or take off
a villain's head with a morbidly cute
Frisbee-style toss of a circular saw
blade? Should the audience shriek in
utter horror when the hero smashes
someone's head on a steel beam?
That's not Captain Marvel - that's a
See INSANE, Page 9

Enjoy
Concert
Sound

r I ,

I

]RALPH' S
MARKET
It is time
to sell our
WINE!
come see our specials
from...
GERMANY
SPAIN &
ROMANIA
also
CHAMPAGNES
709 PACKARD
665-7131
Open 10 a.m. -12a.m. Sun-Thur.
10 a.m. - 2 a.m. Fri-Sat.
Football Saturday hrs. 8 a.m. - 2 a m.

Running
from
substance
By Katherine Hansen
Creator
Starring Peter O'Toole, Mariel Hemingway
BEGIN WITH the eccentric Dr.
Wolper, add his would-be-stud
assistant Boris, combine with 19-
year-old nymphomaniac Meli, fold in
Boris' love interest Barbara, and boil
over high heat for approximately two
hours: the recipe will yield the highly
unstable concoction Creator, starring
Peter O'Toole, Vincent Spano, Mariel
Hemingway, and Virginia Madsen.
Through the four characters
seemingly have little in common, they
all incessantly pursue the same
elusive understanding of love, life,
death, and spiritual awareness. Un-
fortunately, what could potentially
have been a poignant and com-
passionate study of both personal
fulfillment and pertinent social issues
becomes a tainted, self-belittling,
exercise in dull dialogue, average ac-
ting, and unabashed tastelessness.
Some credit must be awarded to
O'Toole, whose portrayal of Dr. Harry

chara
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Ma
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any i
much
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play a
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momi
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bara
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Dr. Wolper desires in a lab assistant.
Boris' evolution from a macho, good- ward
time guy into a sensitive, introspec- we,
tive individual who wants to discover enga
"What makes life have meaning" is deter
far too abrupt, almost laughable in its is m
blantant superficiality. Andms
Similarly, Madsen's portrayal of euth
Barbara is, well, just plain boring. hese
Perhaps a more neurotic, insecureis
Barbara would have been a welcome insti
enhancement of the semi-whiny initia

" AUDIO VIDEO ALBUMS
* TAPES * COMPACT DISCS
618 SOUTH MAIN STREET
ANN ARBOR, MI 48104
TELEPHONE: (313) 769-4700

Wolper, does indeed delve into the
realm of sensitivity. The character of
Dr. Wolper is the most tenderly and
carefully treated; one cannot help but
to sympathize with the lonely Nobel
laureate biologist intent on creating
life - namely that of his long-
deceased wife, Lucy.
O'Toole captivatingly creates an
aura of depressed obsession, a
Frankenstein-esque devotion to a
heartfelt desire which reaches beyond

that of the stereotypical mad scien-
tist. In addition, O'Toole adeptly em-
bodies the eccentricities of Dr.
Wolper, delivering even the most ab-
surd dialogue - such as his scientific
formula for love - with a believable,
personable quality.
It is unfortunate that Spano's and
Madsen's characterizations create a
void into which the story ultimately
falls. Spano as Boris is at best uncon-
vincing as the "fresh new kid" that

Animal House
Terminator
Heavy Metal
Rocky Horror

Breaktast Club
Fri. Harold & Maude
Sat. Fright Night
The Wall

I

994-3572

Open 7 days a
week to better
serve you

MDn

L j__ _ .k.ey..-/-d.yr 9.l
8 -Weekend/Friday, October 11$ 1985 ..... .... . ------------.... . . _... .tz,. . .,.

VWeekend/F

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