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October 11, 1985 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-11

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ARtS
Friday, October 11,-1985

The Michigan Daily

Page 5

Welles and Brynner:
The passing of legends

Orson Welles
(1915-85)

Beethoven galore
The 35-member Hanover Band of London, a period music ensemble celebrat
forming an all Beethoven program this Sunday, October 12 at Hill Auditoriu
American tour. The program consists of the Overture to 'The Creatues of P
Piano Concerto No. 3, with pianist Melvyn Tan. The concert begins at 8 p.m.
Conceptual ventures

HOLLYWOOD (UPI) - Orson
Welles, a Falstaffian genius who at 26
produced, directed and starred in the
epic Citizen Kane, that indeliby et-
ched his name in motion picture
history, died Thursday at his home of
an apparent heart attack. He was 70.
Detective Russell Kuster said a
chauffeur found Welles in an upstairs
bedroom of his Hollywood Hills home
about 10 a.m. and called police and a
physician.
"There is no evidence of foul play,"
Kuster said. "It's obvious the death
was of natural causes."~
In addition to monumental
achievement in Citizen Kane, con-
sidered by many film critics the
greatest movie ever made, Welles has
ed throughout Europe, will be per- best known for his Halloween 1938
um. The orchestra is on their first radio adaptation of H.G. Wells' The
rometheus,' Symphony No. 1, and War of the Worlds.
tickets are $8-$19. But his trademark basso profundo,
booming out the frightening tale of
0d Martians invading New Jersey, sent
ch i waves of panic rolling through radio
ch rolisteners from Maine to Georgia.
Frightened listeners poured into the
streets. Many choked express high-
and delicacy, Mullen was able to ways in cars filled with family and
make images out of the beauty he possessions.
saw. In the publicity ensuing from The
Said Mullen in 1978, "The desert is a War of the Worlds epic, Welles, dub-
marvelously different land - holding bed the "boy genius" was invited to
some kind of other poetry - space, Hollywood to produce and direct
and a sense of survival. I believe it has movies.
been very little known in art, and I A scant three years later he wrote,
wish to make images of that beauty." produced, directed and starred in
Mullen's late works show a fine Citizen Kane, a fact-and-fiction ac-
maturity, almagamating the ex- count of the life of publisher William
pressive pursuits of earlier works and Randolph Hearst. The immense suc-
the conceptual ventures of the 70s. cess at such a tender age came to a
Al Mullen: A Drawing Retrospec- man who only one year earlier had
tive will be on exhibit at the Univer- seen his first movie set.
sity of Michigan Museum of Art until In a recent interview, Welles - a
October 19. Museum hours are man who lived life to the limit - had
Tuesday - Friday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. this to say about death:
Saturday and Sunday 1 - 5 p.m. Ad- "I rejoice in the presence of death
mission is free. because I think it's what makes life
brilliant and beautiful, and without it
1 the world would be ridiculous. I'm in-

terested in it from every point of
view. My interest has not dimmed
with its approach."
Yul Brynner
(1920-85)
NEW YORK (AP) - Yul Brynner,
the man who was king for a record
4,625 performances in the Rodgers

CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division at Catherine
FRIDAY AFTERNOON FIRESIDE
OCTOBER 11th at 4:00 P.M.
FIRST-HAND INFORMATION ON NICARAGUA
Two Ann Arborites, Bill Zirinsky and Brian Larkin, just returned from Managua discuss:
DO THE SANDINISTAS CENSOR THE PRESS IN NICARAGUA?
ARE THE CONTRAS KILLING CIVILIANS THERE?
and other questions about the current situation.
All are welcome. For more information call 665-0606
LAW SCHOOL CONVERSATIONS
with
ALLAN STILLWAGON
Assistant Dean and Admissions Officer
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN LAW SCHOOL
Small group discussions on preparation for Law School,
Law School expectations and how decisions are made
TIME: 9:00-12:00 and 1:30 - 4:30
(Hourly discussions at 9, 10, 11 a. m.
and :30, 2.30, 3.30p.m.)

and Hammerstein musical The King
and I, died Thursday after a two-year
battle with lung cancer. He was 65.
With him at The New York
Hospital-Cornell Medical Center were
his fourth wife, Kathy Lee, and his
four children, said Josh Ellis, a
family spokesman.
"He faced death with a dignity and
See LOSS, Page 6

By Lisa Jaffe
O NE ON THE immediate
pleasures of Al Mullen's
drawings, now on display at the
University of Michigan Museum of
Art, is the dazzling variety of media,
color, tone, and attack. Each piece in
the show has something of its own to
say, whether it's with unexpected
justapositions of color or surprising
transitions of surface and texture.
Al Mullen taught in the School of
Art for almost 30 years prior to his
death in 1983. Before arriving in Ann
Arbor, in 1956, Mullen trained at
Cooper Union Art School in New York
City; studied with Fernand Leger in
Paris and Hans Hofmann in New
York and Provincetown; and taught
at Cooper Union, Columbia, the
Brooklyn Museum Art School, and
Brown University.
As you enter the exhibit you are
greeted by a small collection of
detailed pen drawings, dating from
the 1940s. These works are meticulous
and tight, yet fine and tender. At
times the figures appear religiously
symbolic or mythic, and other times
the figures seem to have grown out of
a process akin to doodling.
The works dated after 1949 show a
true accomplishment of space, color,
and architectural technique. "In
Shadow," a 1954 ink on oaktag, ex-
p presses a sense of open but embodied
space, an airiness despite the presen-
ce of often dense fields of black
marks. The Chinese-like
brushstrokes, thick, thin, vertical,
and horizontal are feathered and
spontaneous. Mullen's rendering of
shape and surface is freer and more
satisfying.
In the late 1940s, Mullen began to
use charcoal, crayons, and pastels.
Working with crayons and tempera
an W

on paper, Mullen reveals his ex-
ploration of the interaction of color
within precice, geometric structures.
Important as it is, color is not the
whole story here. Lines at various
lengths spaced at regular intervals,
spring from the borders and bite into
the central color fields. Muller's use
of lines as a vehicle for shade and
color does not become visually
monotonous.
From the late '60s into the early '70s
Mullen's strict geometric forms are
somewhat freer. Lines are not just
vertical and horizontal, but cur-
vilinear as well.
The best of Mullen's work is a blend
of Southwest landscape and
geometric form. During the early '70s,
Mullen formed a bond between his
appreciation and fascination with the
beauty of. landscape and his own
profound involvement with
techniques of meditation and self
awareness. The deserts in the South-
west, and the coastal scenery around
Big Sur dominate his work in the 70s.
His love of the desert is best ex-
pressed in a series of desert scenes
hidden on a far wall. Crisp tans,
blues, grays, yellows, crimson, and
silver greens are the predominant
colors in the series. With great care

PLACE:
DATES:

310 Hutchins Hall
(Law SchoolAdmissions Office)
October 23, Wednesday
November 5, Tuesday
December 5, Thursday

INTERESTED STUDENTS PLEASE SIGN UP FOR A
TIME AND DATE BY CALLING OR VISITING
310 HUTCHINS HALL, TELEPHONE 764-0537

[Q o
l
D
Support the
March of Dimes
BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION

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