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October 07, 1985 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6

Hockey
vs. Miami (OH)
Friday, 7:30 p.m.
Yost Ice Arena

SPORTS

Field Hockey
vs. Northwestern
Friday, 4 p.m.
Ferry Field

The Michigan Daily Monday, October 7, 1985y Page 7
____ ___ ____ _ __--_____a__T__"___A__ __ - 1A

r

Snap
J Budgements
By MIKE REDSTONE

Packers pummel lions

/7

,W,;-

GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) - Phillip
Epps caught two touchdown passes,
Jame Lofton grabbed 10 passes for 151
yards and an aggressive Green Bay
defense stifled a bumbling Detroit of-
fense as the Packers romped over the
Lions 43-10 yesterday.
Detroit had six turnovers in the
game - four lost fumbles and two in-
terceptions. The blitzing Packers
sacked Lions quarterback four times.

Joe Ferguson, replacing an ineffec-
tive Eric Hipple, was sacked for a
safety in the third quarter by Robert
Brown. That gave the Packers a 43-3
lead entering the fourth quarter.
The Lions scored their only touch-
down of the day midway through the
fourth quarter when Ferguson hit
Alvin Moore with a 13-yard touchdown
strike.

Swarming M' defense.

0*

. ,blitzes Big Ten
O KAY, EVERYONE knows that after Saturday's 33-6 victory over
Wisconsin, Michigan has allowed only one touchdown in building a 4-0
record.
But looking at the Big Ten, a lot of weird things have been happening this
season.
'For example, Iowa is ranked first in the nation, Illinois has dropped out of
the top 20, Indiana is in the top 20 and Michigan, a team expected by most to
go nowhere this year, is ranked as one of the seven best squads in the nation.
-And after a weekend in which Illinois defeated fifth-ranked Ohio State and
Iowa nearly lost to that offensive powerhouse - Michigan State, the
Wolverines may be the best team going in the Big Ten right now.
What is responsible for the Wolverines' success this season?
Well, most experts agree that the best offense is a good defense. But I think
Michigan coach Bo Schembechler would say, 'The best offense is a good
defense - and the best defense is a good offense,' In a word Balance is
the key.
If I told you once ...
Schembechler has said over and over this year that the offense has helped
the defense by keeping possession of the ball. And the Michigan offense has
controlled the ball 60 percent of the time this season. That is, without a
doubt, an aid to the defense.
But a defense that gives up 51/4 points per game doesn't need too much
help, except from itself. Balance within the defensive unit has been the key
t6 the Wolverines success. The line helps the defensive backs and vice versa.
Michigan's defensive line, led by tackle Mike Hammerstein, has plagued
opposing quarterbacks all season. In fact, the Wolverine defense has 14
acks so far this year as opposed to 25 during all of last year. At that pace,
Michigan will finish with 39 sacks, not too shabby.
In addition, those 14 sacks have dropped opposing quarterbacks for 129
yards in losses, an average of 9.2 yards per sack.
Blanket coverage
Of course, Michigan's experienced defensive secondary corps has played
an important role in this sack barrage. Without good coverage of receivers,
quarterback sacks are next to impossible.
"-But the defensive backs' main glory statistic, interceptions, are equally
itugh to come by if the defensive line is unable to pressure the quarterback.
.Not surprisingly, then, the Wolverines lead the Big Ten with 13 intercep-
tions, including five against the Badgers.
Michigan's third interception Saturday afternoon epitomizes this balance
(of power) between the defensive line and the secondary.
With 2:56 left in the third quarter and Michigan leading 17-6, Wisconsin
quarterback Mike Howard dropped back to pass at his own 21.
Middle guard Billy Harris broke through Wisconsin's offensive line, for-
cing Howard to throw the ball while running left. The result: cornerback
Garland Rivers intercepted the pass and bolted 27 yards for a touchdown.
Brad Cochran's fourth quarter interception was the result of similar1
ressure on Howard.
The 6-4, 219 pound signal caller rolled from the Michigan 31 as the right
side of the Wolverine line broke through. Cochran abruptly ended the
dger's drive as he stepped in front of Tim Fullington to pick off the pass at
the 21. With the pressure on him, Howard never even saw Cochran.
This has been the trademark of Michigan's bend-but-not-break defense all
year long. Inside of the Michigan 30-yard line, opponents have discovered a
swarming defensive attack and exceptional pass coverage.
"I think ... that we're putting a little more pressure on the passer this
year than we did a year ago," said Schembechler. "That part of it (the
defense) has helped the secondary a lot."
And with the defense helping itself so much this year, more weird events
may occur as Michigan treads its way through the Big Ten schedule. One of
them may be a Rose Bowl berth for the Maize and Blue.

TAKE THE LEAD
Help New Students or Their Parents
Discover the Diversity of Michigan
BE A SUMMER
ORIENTATION
LEADER
Pick up applications at the
Orientation Office, (3000 Michigan Union) or call
764-6290 for further information.
an affirmative action non-discriminatory employer

Daily Photo by DAN HABIB

On a roll
Quarterback Jim Harbaugh rolls out before completing a touchdown pass
to running back Gerald White during Saturday's Badger beating. Har-
baugh passed for 144 yards and three touchdowns.

I E PICKS
Superstitions and jinxes live on in
Griddes.
Daily sports editor Tom Keaney put
the hex on a Gridde entry this week.
When Liz Cavanaugh's pick was
discovered by Keaney, the New Ham-
pshire-born, Boston-bred editor
snidely circled "Kappa Kappa Gam-
ma" on Liz's entry. In the margin, the
Kean-eye scrawled "Oh my gawd!"
Naturally,rLiz went on to breeze to
an easy Griddes victory, going 18-2,
beating all comers by at least two
games. In the Daily's staff pool,
Keaney went 15-5.
"Oh my gawd!"
1. MICHIGAN at Michigan State
2. Iowa at Wisconsin
3. Indiana at Ohio State
4. Minnesota at Northwestern
5. Illinois at Purdue
6. Oklahoma at Texas
7. Nebraska at Oklahoma State
8. Tennessee at Florida
9. Baylor at SMU
10. Florida State at Auburn
11. Houston at Texas A&M
12. Alabama at Penn State
13. UCLA at Stanford
14. Boston College at Army
15. The Strategic Defense Bowl: Air
Force at Navy
16. Arkansas at Texas Tech
17. LSU at Vanderbilt
18. Harvard at Cornell
19. Marshall at Furman
20. DAILY LIBELS at Stress, Flab,
and Bad Nutrition

E-Systems continues
the tradition of
the world's great problem solvers.

I

WIM,

SCORES
NFL Football
Chicago 27,Tampa Bay 19
-Los Angeles Rams 13,Minnesota 10
San Francisco 38, Atlanta 17
Miami 24, Pittsburgh 20
Seattle 26, San Diego 21
Denver 31, Houston 20
Los Angeles Raiders 19, Kansas City 10
Indianapolis 49, Buflalo 17
New Orleans 23, Philadelphia 21

A*iiYO(iYC/iW/
LUNCH: Pasta & Wine Special - $4.25. Fresh pasta
topped with a delicious seafood sauce of the day. Served
with a tossed salad, bread & butter and your choice of
any of our house wines.

i

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P. 0:
iyi. i".:r:. . ". 11 f
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DINNER SPECIALS:

1

Sunday
Monday

All You Can Eat Beef Ribs - $5.50
Prime beef ribs slowly baked in our special bar-b-que
sauce. Served with Whiffletree fries, cole slaw, bread
& butter.

Steinmetz was one of solutions to some of the E-Systems in Florida,
the few geniuses concerned world's toughest problems Indiana, Texas, Utah or
with the practical aspects in electronics. Virginia contact your Place-
of electrical engineering. E-Systems is recog- ment Director or write:
His pragmatic analytical nized as one of the world's E-Systems, Inc., College
approach led to the de- leading problem-solving Relations, Post Office Box
velopment of efficient companies in the design 660248, Dallas, Texas
electrical power grids as and production of com- 75266-0248.
we know them today. munications, data, antenna, E-SYSTEMS
Scientists and en- intelligence and recon-
gineers at E-Systems are naissance systems that are The problem solvers.
carrying on in his tradition. often the first-of-a-kind in
Through the combination of the world.Anequal opportunity employer M/F, H, V
sophisticated analytical and For information on
simulation techniques, they career opportunities with
are evolving optimal system
Charles Proteus Steinmetz
1865-1923
AV
r--

Tuesday All You Can Eat Pasta - $5.50
Fresh Linguine topped with a combination of baby
shrimp, crab meat or other seafood delicacies.
Served with a fresh garden salad, bread & butter.

ISN'T
ALWAY
THE BE

/

Wednesday
5:30-10 p.m.

Prime Rib & Seafood Buffet - $13.95
The best buffet in town featuring standing prime rib
sliced to order, shrimp cocktail, jet fresh seafood,
seasonal garden vegetables, colorful salads and a
tantalizing dessert table.

S
EST

I Thursday All You Can Eat Frog Legs - $5.95
Frog legs served roadhouse style with an orange
marmalade horseradish sauce, Whiffletree fries, cole
slaw, bread & butter.
LUNCH 11:30-4:30 - DINNER 4:30-12 p.m.
Specials good thru Oct. 10
To add to your dining pleasure, the Whiffletree is
proud to present an all new imported beer and wines
by the glass menu. Available lunch and dinner.

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