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October 04, 1985 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-04
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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LOCAL BAr4fDUsNR

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(Continued from Page 3)
W: What about politics in music? Is
music art for art's sake? Where do
you go with it?
K: There's so many different
people in the world that inevitably
someone's going to come up with
political music because that's how
they look at the world. We just look at
the world (chuckles).
S: We're not political as people so I
don't think our music can be that
political.
W: You can't effect change through
three chords and an anthemic
chorus?
S: No.
K: Yeah, I think you can, but it
won't work on a political level. It's all
on a personal level. Music's changed
my life, but that's not why we're
doing it. We're just looking at the
world in a particular way. We're not
didactic. That would be too boring.
Like the Clash and Joe Strummer.
S: He's probably a real nice guy,
but...
W: Do you see yourselves in the pop
medium, making lots of money, or do
you consider yours more of a cult
music?
K: We could get as big as anything.
It's all luck and business from here.
We've certainly got the mass appeal
of, say, the Talking Heads. Who
would've ever thought the Talking
Heads would get that huge? We're a
lot more accessible than the Talking
Heads.
W: Have you ever said, 'Screw this
integrity bit, we've gotta make some
money'?
K: No, I could never - well, kind of

- I don't think you have to be that
black and white about it. If you're
smart, you can do exactly what you
want and make it sell.
S: You have to have the right at-
titude. If you think you can push your
way into something, then it's going to
collapse. You have to be really gentle.
W: What about an album?
K: The album's somewhat
hypothetical right now.
S: We could make two or three
albums, we've got enough material.
K: We could make at least three
albums. But for now, we'll just con-
centrate on the one album. We'll
probably record it this winter.
W: Do you see yourselves building
to a national level?
K: Oh, easily. Like the level of the
Replacements or dB's? That's not
luck, that's perseverance. We've cer-
tainly got that. We're finally a com-
petent band. We can play our in-

struments, which is a far cry from
what we could do before. When we'll
have a Top-10 record is another mat-
ter.
W: How do you feel about the
popularity of places like Athens and
Austin? It seems like every Southern
band is getting signed.
S: It goes through phases. The
scene in Athens is a lot different now
than when it started.
K: It's nowhere now. It was a lot
more authentic at first. Now it's just
like, go to sleep.
W: What about Ann Arbor?
S: It's got too much of a history of
hippies and blues.
K: I don't know, if one band broke
out of here, most probably us, people
would say, 'Oh yeah, they're from
Ann Arbor.' Then people would notice
other bands. Then it would become a
scene on some level. Anything's
possible.

Toward
something
new
By Noelle Brower
The Daughter-in-Law
By D. H. Lowrence
October 3-5, 6-13; 8p.m.
October 6 and 13; 2 p.m.
$6-$12.50
B ERNARD SHAW once said,
"England and America are two
countries separated by the same
language." Even so, this same
language has produced masterpieces
of literature, film, and theatre,
producing a similar, if not congruous,
culture.
Straddling both sides of the Atlantic
seems to be no problem for exactingly
British John Russell Brown, the newly
appointed artistic director of the
University's Project Theatre and
chairman of the Theatre and Drama
department.
"Actually," he says, "I've been
coming to America since 1957. Of
course I find it stimulating. It is ex-
citing to find a double view of theatre,
of life. America and England have a
greater definition if you're allowed to
travel between the two, as lam."
Being in charge of a university
program is not new to him; he was the
artistic director of the well-known
theatre department at the University
of Birmingham in England. And he is
still an associate director at the
National Theatre of Great Britain, a
post he has held since 1973, when

Peter Hall invited him to work there
as developer of a program of new and
foreign language plays.
Brown'sgknowledge of the two
cultures and the ease with which he
glides between them resulted in his in-
troducing the work of American
playwrights David Mamet and Sam
Sheperd into the National Theatre's
repertoire.
"A couple of years ago the work
there (at the National Theatre) just
becamentoo engrossing," said Brown.
He found he was bogged down by
paper work and couldn't really do
what he wanted to - directing. Then
Brown received an invitation to teach
at the Stony Brook campus at the
State University of New York.
"This was a similar job to the one I
held at the National Theatre, only it
offered me a chance to do a greater
number of productions," said Brown.
While giving a lecture in Ann Arbor
last November for the acclaimed
series on Samuel Beckett, Brown said
he spoke with Paul Boylan (dean of
the music school) and "was asked
what might be done about the theatre
department without thinking about
the position for myself." An invitation
was made, and the rest is history.
The idea of taking of the dual job of
department chairman and director of
a professional theatre company ap-
pealed to him. "It gives me a chance
to bring my professional theatre
work to the study of theatre, and
education of theatre students. The
chance of bringing, as it were, my left
hand and my right hand together
again was very enticing."
Unfortunately, his new position fin-
ds him guiding a department in need
of organization and with a shortage of
funds. The department's woes include
last year's termination of several
theatre groups within the department,
the temporary withholding of the
PhD program, and the hurried depar-

THE DAUGHTER-IN-LAW: Annalee Jefferies plays Minnie and Matthew Cond
D.H. Lawrence's play, only recently popular.

Daily Photo by DARRIAN SMITH

SOPHIA HANIFI: Extremely clear vocals.

DRINKING AND DRIVING
CAN KILL A FRIENDSHII.

ture of former director, Walter
Eysselinck.
Brown doesn't seem intimidated by
these obstacles; he has thrown him-
self head-long into a busy schedule to
implement his ideas and projects.
Whether he is busy directing the first
production of the year, or teaching an
undergraduate course in directing,
Brown puts his whole self, devotedly,

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FI LM5:
at the Michigan Theater
8:00 FRIDAY, OCT. 4
Prism Productions presents
ANN ARBOR COMEDY JAM
Host and creator Mike Binder with Rich Hall from
Saturday Night Live also starring Judy Tenuta and Dave
Coulier.
8:00 SATURDAY, OCT. 5
Benjamin
Allan Productions presents
THE ALLIES: Invasion Tour
With The Joe English Band
Live in concert.

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Enjoy
Concert
Sound

$2 50 MON DAY TH-RU FRIDAY
2 SHOWS STARTING EFORE 600 PM
SAT UNTIL 130 PM SUN FIRST SHOW ONLY

( C EVERY TUESDAY ALL SEATS

into each of his tasks; he's the sort
who doesn't just walk into a room, he
bounds in.
Brown's ideas concerning an
education in theatre are very well
established in. his mind. "I want to
keep the professionals, graduates,
and undergraduates separate. I think
students at whatever level they are at
should have the opportunity to play at
their own level."
This is not to say that he plays
favorites among the three levels. "Ac-
tors at all stages need the stimulus of
good, fat challenging parts," he
said. "The only way to do this is to have
good leads.- The combining of
professionals with graduate students,
or the graduate students with un-
dergraduates, chances are, the ones
with the most experience will con-
tinually get the good parts, leaving
the others as butlers or holding the
spears, as it were. And you don't get
good by doing that. It's like football -
you don't send a beginning player to
start for a really crack team;
someone will get hurt that way. This

"
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Copying
Resumes
Binding
Brochures
Foil stamping
Carbonless forms
Business cards
Letterheads
Envelopes

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Transparencies
Books
Word Processing
Typesetting
Padding
Stapling
Folding
Labels
Dissertations

II

I

ST. ELMO'S FIRE (R)
10:05,12:10,2:30.4:40,7:10,9:40
MAXIE
100512:10 230,4:40,7:10,9:40
COCOON (PG13)
10:05,1:00,4:10,7:00.9:50
YEAR OF THE DRAGON (R)
10:05,1:00,4:10,7:00,9:50
BLACK CAULDRON (PG)
12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:15, 9:30
FOLLOW THAT BIRD (G)
1000, 12:15,2:30, 4:15, 6:00
FIGHT NIGHT (R)
10:00,12:15,4:15,7:15.9:45
THE GODS MUST BE CRAZY (PG)
1000, 2157:30, 9:45

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4:00
7:00
9:00

SUNDAY, OCT. 6
NEVERENDING STORY
A magical, timelessfantasy built around young Oliver,
who visualizes what he reads from a mystical book.
Amazing, unique effects, characters and visual design.

7:00 MONDAY, OCT. 7
9:00 PINK FLOYD: THE WALL
DIR.-ALAN PARKER
The~ expolsive sounds of rock 'n' roll legends Pink Floyd
and the visual genius of Alan Parker and animator Ger-
ald Scafe combine to make the first real rock-opera
about a rock star's mental breakdown.'
See all these great films projected on the large screen in the historic1
Michigan Theater. Call 668-8397 for more information. Admission to
films is $3.00 for a double bill or a single bill. Students and senior
citizens $2.50. Tickets go on sale one-half hour before showtime.

.
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and off-campus l
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