100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 04, 1985 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-04
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I
Im m

- -'- = -
- --- --- -

THRATR1

.V V - V

"

-LOCAL B4

A'
TA
BI
For ne
standa
crafts:
ards, h
Rolex,
"Oyst
fashio
perfor
qualit
The di

DON'T GET CHAINED -
TO YOUR TYPEWRITER IStraddlng
Sandi will set you free (ConuedfomPge
Sandi's Typing & Wordprocessing * and not in America and I think that's
426-5217 a pity," he said.
campus pick-up and delivery I "Lawrence is a great writer of
good thru: 12/11/85(i per customer) B passion and eloquence, in some ways
-~~~~~~~~~ l n J ike Eugene O'Neil. Since he was
primarily a novelist, what he has
written as a playwright is similar to a
condensation of his novels onstage.'"
Set in the coal-mining country of
England's northern Midlands, the
play centers around a typical
Lawrence character, the independent
woman. Lawrence, like Ibsen, made
his best characters female; he under-
stood them so well. In the play we feel
the despair and frustration of Minnie,
who is trying to be a wife and make a
home for herself within the suf-
focating walls of a miner's cottage.
There are no villains in this play, only
TH E W ISE people caught in a life that they have
no control over.
In 1985 Minnie wouldn't be out of
place; in 1912 she is. Her husband isn't
cruel to her and in fact he loves her
-arly eight decades, Rolex has set the very much, but he too is a victim of
ards of timekeeping in style, in circumstance and false expectations.
manship, in reliability. These stand- his role as a man.d
honored today by your Authorized
Jeweler, define the world-famed Remarkably modern for its time,
er" image. Its mystique exceeds mere the play is still contemporary, pain-
n; it is a focus for dependability and ting a very modern problem that
'mance in timekeeping, a lifelong women face upon a backdrop of class
;y investment.fconsciousness. Lawrence also uses
the dialect of the miners to add poetic
scerning watch buyer has learned to realism to the play."

t
\ . ..
"w.14b.
.4
\.
.,.A....
iJOHN RUSSELL BROWN: Straddling both sides of the Atlantic is no

... ..

-I

Important
notice
By Hobey Echlin
N THE HIGHLY commercialized
world of new music there are few
bands that defy the cliched monikers
and even fewer who want to. Map of
the World does both. Now ap-
proaching their sixth year of more or
less existence, the band features
founding members Sophia Hanifi as
singer/songwriter, her brother
Khalid as
guitarist/singer/songwriter, and
newer members Tim Delaney on bass
and Tom Whitaker on drums. With
the release of their second record, the
Hiroshima Girls EP, and with an Oc-
tober 8 New York show booked and
other East Coast dates in the works,
Map of the World have established
themselves as Ann Arbor's best new
music act and are becoming the band
to watch.
Their first record,
MonkeyPaw/Disconnection won Map
of the World instant recognition in
such musical venues as Creem
magazine, and only hinted at their
potential for diversity. Listeners hear
Khalid Hanifi offering the darker side
of the Map with the brooding
"Monkey Paw," while Sophia exposes
a more accessible, poppy "Discon-
nection" with its catchy but not too
cutsey bassline.
People who have seen them live all
over town were subject to more of the
diversity of the band. Brooding
ballads have been followed by hook-
filled dance songs like "The Point of
the Party." You just never really
know what to expect. Burt Bacharach
might follow the Kinks, or CCR follow
Gene Vincent, besides their broad
range of originals.
Lacking any imposing stage
presence, the comparisons to acts like
the early Talking Heads started cir-
culating, but still no one could grasp
their sound, though "psyche-rockers"
and "off-center modern pop" were
healthy attempts.
To complicate things further, their
new EP offers even more dimensions
of Map of the World's sound. With ex-
tremely clear vocals from Sophia and
an extra-powered sound from Khalid
and Whitaker's production, the title
track, "Hiroshima Girls," is a swifter
jangly-guitar ramble with even more
biting lyrics than before:
Somedgy I'll find a way to get
out of the Backwards Time Bomb
common count. / Don't let it hap-
pen, say the Hiroshima girls / Sur-
vivors don't live in the real world.
/ Don't plan on looking inside the
Mother / For the heartbeat of the
future.
This is followed by the unpredic-
tability of a cover of the Willie
Nelson/Patsy Cline sit-down-and-set-
a-spell classic "Crazy," with Sophia
providing the eased out country
vocals. And add to this the B-side's
second song, the happier, and dare I
say, poppier "Great Days," and
you've got a record that's as
refreshingly diverse as it is quan-
tumly strong.

a po(
plain
K:
song
go t
going
Paw,
I was
and
my h
write
the w
W:
from
S:
you 1
thing
Well,
thing
calle
nove
dark
W.
K:
blow:
sion.
W.
of do
there
wom
have
this s
gettii
that
vivid
of thi:
K:
we 've
It's k4
good.
lyric:
K:
word
and I
thing
now 1
bulls]
W:
work
"Hire
arou:
these
work
idea1
r--

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY
MAP OF THE WORLD: (left to right) Khalid Hanifi, Sophia Hanifi, Tom Whitaker, and Tim Delaney.

recognize this commitment to excellence,
this Rolex reputation for integrity in
marketing. For him, there is just one
source for the elegant, impregnable Rolex
of his choice: his Authorized Rolex
Jeweler.
For expert guidance in your own Rolex
purchase, for its uncompromising war-
ranty and Swiss-honed after-sales service,
come to the people who present and protect
the genuine Rolex product: your
Authorized Rolex Jeweler.
ROLEX

r

"He has a superb ear and sense of
language," said Brown, who has cast
a completely professional ensemble
from New York to play the parts of the
miners and their families.
The Daughter in Law will be
presented Thursday, through Satur-
day evenings at 8 p.m. on Oct. 3-5 and

the following weekend as well at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
"I look forward to meeting an
audience because when one is doing
rehearsals one gets more and more
anxious to see it performed in front of
an audience. Because a play is never
complete until then."

W" OOKS

We're up
on
everything!
News ......... 764-0552
Sports ........ 763-0376
Arts/Mag. .....763-0379
Classifieds ... .764-0557
Circulation ...764-0558
U be
3i... d.........-

Stargazer
(Continued from Page 3)
The most indisputable quality of
Contact, however, is its realism.
Sagan achieves a remarkably
believable plot for two reasons. First,
he sets events in the very near future,
when the technology seems familiar
to today's readers. The Message is
received in 1988, and the novel ends at
the turn of the millennium. Second,
the author pays scrupulous attention
to scientific detail. The audience en-
joys the advantage of reading a scien-
tific fiction book by an expert on the
concepts involved. Sagan is able to
transmit hisknowledge clearly and
simply. As a result, Contact is not
only highly entertaining, but
educational as well.
Scientific genius is 'rare, as is'
literary accomplishment. Contact

1 spoke with Khalid and Sophia
(Tim and Tom were busy with other
music projects) at length about the
World and its place in the musical
sun. Sometimes deceptively simple,
sometimes unconsciously profound,
sometimes surprisingly candid, they
can be a little misleading once in a
while. But if you're confused, well,
you've got as good an excuse as any to
see them when they get back from the
East Coast.
Weekend: Let's talk band history.
Sophia: We tried to put a band
together for a long time with things
like ads, where we lived, in Saline,
and we would come to Ann Arbor
because of all the musicians that lived
there.
Khalid: Which is kind of
true ... there weren't that many
musicians.
S: We had a really shakey kind of
thing for a while.
K : For a long time. (laughs). We
just had a sort of theoretical music
set-.up. But we finally got people to
go for it and formed the first band.
S: So we all moved in together and
lived together for about two years'. . .
K: .. . which was more like a bad
marriage than anything (laughs). But
don't print that (mock seriousness).
W: No, no, no, certainly not (mock
(assurance).
S: Then we had a falling out with
the band and the other person decided
to get married. So then Tom
(Whitaker) had been around
producing our single.- the first single
before the EP - so he knew our music
really well. And we asked him if he'd
be our drummer. Then we found Tim
(Delaney).
K: Tim was just there. Tim's per-
fect, real easy to deal with.
W: What kind of music did you grow
up with?
S: Beatles.
K: Beatles were the big thing. I
went through my Who phase and my
Kinks phase, I still love all that stuff.

W: What about music you listen to
now?
K: In terms of pop music, I listen to
very little. I listen to Big Star, which
is really great.
S: Really pure pop.
K: It's something you never heard
before, so you're not sick of it at all.
It's like getting three Beatles albums
that had never been released.
S: I've been listening to really bad
country music.
W: Which brings me to my next
question. Where did the Willie Nelson
/ Patsy Cline cover on the new EP
come from?
S: Just because I like it. I have this
album of Patsy Cline's which is just
great. So I thought, what the hell?
K: Patsy Cline was an obvious per-
son to cover because of the voice
similarity.
S: Well, I don't know if you could
say that.
W: What about influences in
songwriting? Is there anything you
listen to and say 'That's the kind of
music I want to play'?
S: There are so many phases of
that kind of thing ...

K: I've gone through so many
phases of that that I don't even think
about it anymore. When I write a
song, I don't try to write like anyone
else. I just try to hear a color or a
feeling.
W: I can hear everything from
Elvis Costello to a jangley '60s flavor.
It's all there?
K: Oh yeah, it's all there, and more.
S: We've written these songs in
such a long period of time -.I mean
for where we are - that there's all
these little things.
W: How many years has it been?
K: Since '79 at least. I mean, when
we first started writing songs, the few
songs that we did write were like -
'O.K., I'm gonna write a song like
Elvis Costello' - and I would go
through and get all the chord changes.
And that lasted for about a year. You
go through phases. And now, I just do
whatever I do, (Laughs). It's all
process.
W : As far as your music goes, what
about the diversity of styles? Like
"Monkey Paw", a kind of weirdity,
and "Disconnection," a real musical
song, and "Hiroshima Girls," more of
HARRY'S
ARMY SURPLUS
ALL
LEE'S & LEVI'S
Men's and Women's Jeans
OFF REGULAR
2'uPRICE!
price good thru Oct. 10, 1985
201 E. Washington
CORNER OF FOURTH AVE.
994-3572 aOeeda
serve you MD

BOERSMA
TRAVEL
Call the
FRIENDLY
AGENT
Ask about our
Halloween trip
drawing.
BOERSMA TRAVEL -
DOMESTIC
' 14 NICKELS ARCADE
+ 994-6200

Fc

demonstrates Sagan's excellence in
both areas, and establishes him as
both scientist and artist.,

10 Weekend/Friday, October 4, 1985

Weekend/F

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan