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October 03, 1985 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-03

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4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 3, 1985

Question: "Do you think that sit-ins, such as the one in Carl
Pursell's office, are an effective means of causing political
change?"

Thomas Chamberlain,
Alumnus: Yes, and they
could be more effective. It's
better than fire-bombing his
office. It's a means of get-
ting attention to the issue.
More people should do it.

Mike Caulk: I think it's a
start. Sit-ins encourage
those who already have an
opinion, but it takes more
than that for people who
don't hold that opinion. It's
more irritating to the op-
position.

David Bailey, LSA Fresh-
man: I'd say so. The only
way to get through to
someone is to be on their
doorstep. Do it again and
again until you get the point
across.

Dave Swastek, Alumnus: I
think they can be, depending
on the situation and on how
it's handled. It also depends
on if you are getting a reac-
tion and who you are sitting-
in against.

Christie Bogdan, LSA
Junior: It's an effective way
of getting a cause noticed,
but I don't know if they
necessarily cause political
change.

Beth Davidson, LSA Senior: Jeff Beyersdorf, Natural Wendi Zazik, LSA Fresh- Perry Cabean, LSA Anthony Adams, Graduate
No, because they are not Sciences Senior: It depends man: Sometimes they prove Sophomore: I feel all sit-ins Student: Sure, because
taken seriously by anyone on how they are composed. to be effective, but in other can do is show the public's usually they involve a large
important enough to make a If they're disruptive, they situations they don't. It awareness. I think, though, amount of people and any
decision. It's a good attempt aren't as effective as when depends on the cause and over a period of time they type of collective activity is
to show discontent, but it is they go in with the idea of how much publicity it gets. will become more effective going to be noticed by a lot of
not the most powerful getting the point across. if they are carried out people.
method. properly.
...................s.........................................................................................................---------------------.------------------------------.
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Power
outage
cancels
classes

(Continued from Page 1)
resume today.
The signs announcing the class can-
cellations were greeted with reactions
ranging from disbelief to joy.
"I'm glad. It's a nice surprise,"
said LSA sophmore JoAnn Mattson.
"I LOVE IT," said LSA junior Dan
Linesman, "I hope MLB B116 bur-
ned."
Not everyone was lucky enough to

have their classes cancelled, though.
Dozens of signs appeared on doors
throughout the day, notifying students
of alternate rooms in other buildings.
As LSA senior C.J. Stoyka lamen-.
ted: "Why couldn't it be University-
wide?"
TO THE professors and staff who
use the MLB, problems such as this
are nothing new.
"I'm not surprised," said professor

of Slavic languages Ladislav
Matejka, "it's such a lemon - the
whole building. No air, sometimes too
hot, sometimes too cold. It's just im-
possible."
Jeff Vahlbush, a teaching assistant
for Great Books, said there was a
similar power failure in August.
"It was a hard blow to those people
who had tests," Vahlbush said.

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
Israelis insist PLO bombing
won't mar peace process
JERUSALEM - Government leaders insisted yesterday that the
Israeli bombing of Palestine Liberation Organization headquarters in
Tunisia on Tuesday will not seriously damage efforts to revive the Middle
East peace process.
"There is no political price to pay, and there will be none," Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, interviewed by Israel radio, said from New
York where he is attending the U.N. General Assembly session.
"There is general recognition in the world of the fact that Israel did
what is necessary. It certainly has the right to strike at the terrorist
organization that attacks citizens both at home and abroad."
The Reagan administration today sharpened its response to Israel's
bombing of a PLO facility in Tunisia, calling the raid understandable but
deplorable and contrary to U.S. objectives of a peaceful Middle East.
Tunisian officials criticized the United States for failing to warn them
of an Israeli air attack on the PLO headquarters.
West German calls for ban
on 'Star Wars' research
BONN, West Germany - Former Chancellor Willy Brandt said yester-
day that West German scientists should not join in research on President
Reagan's proposed 'Star Wars' space-based anti-missile defense system.
"I would rather, with our limited means, concentrate on . . . the
peaceful uses of space," said Brandt, chairman of the opposition Social
Democratic Party.
In an interview with the Associated Press, the West German statesman
also called on Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to use their
summit meeting in November to announce a new aid program for Africa.
"If they said we are ready, both of us, to use some small percentage of
what would otherwise go into armaments to bring water to Africa ... that
could mean a good deal," Brandt said.
Brandt, who will receive the Albert Einstein Peace Prize at a
Washington ceremony next month, was interviewed as a debate was
growing in the West German capital over the role this ally of the United
States should play in the Reagan adminstration's 'Star Wars' program,
officially known as the Strategic Defense Initiative.
French, Soviets discuss arms
PARIS - President Francois Mitterrand and Mikhail Gorbachev,
discussed the possibilities of "a serious, real redudction" in armaments
yesterday, six weeks before the U.S.-Soviet summit.
Mitterrand's spokesman said the president and the Soviet leader also
touched on the Reagan administration's 'Star Wars' research program
for a space-based defense system in their first private meeting.
Gorbachev is in France for four days, on his first visit to the West since
taking over as Kremlin leader in March.
He repeated Soviet opposition to the space-defense plan in his arrival
statement, speaking of the need to prevent "an arms race in space and
end it on Earth."
Mitterrand told Gorbachev that "too many conflicts, suffering, attacks
on the dignity and rights (of man) are afflicting men today," presidential
spokesman Michel Vauzelle said.
On Tuesday, Reagan invited France, Canada, Britain, West Germany,
Italy and Japan, to meet him in New York Oct. 24 to discuss the upcoming
Reagan-Gorbachev summit. Mitterrand refused the invitation.
Chrysler offers cut-rate loans
DETROIT - Starting today, buyers looking for 1985 cars will find cut-
rate financing only at Chrsyler Corp. dealerships.
The No. 3 automaker is running its 7.5 percent financing through Satur-
day, making it the only player in the cut-rate game for three days.
Special financing deals offered by General Motors Corp., Ford Motor
Co. and American Motors Corp. expired yesterday, the same day many
1986 cars officially went on sale.
Chrysler is hoping its three extra days of sales activity under its incen-
tive program will raise up its market share and steal some sales from GM
and Ford. Its share of the industry has already risen to almost 14 percent
so far in 1985, compared with about 12 percent a year ago.
For the last six to seven weeks, carmakers have been offering
programs through their finance subsidiaries, slashing interest rates'
down to about 7.5 percent on an annual basis.
S. African students skip classes
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Thosands of black students boycot-
ted classes on the first day of the new school term yesterday, in a protest
against apartheid.
Police reported scattered, isolated, rioting but no deaths.
In Soweto, the nation's largest black area, southwest of Johannesburg,
students roamed the dusty streets as soldiers aboard armored personnel
carriers took up positions in schoolyards.
No students attended classes at 174 of the 7,000 black schools in South:
Africa, and attendance appeared to vary from 5 percent to 95 pecent at

others, said Job Schoeman, spokesman for the national Department of
Education and Training.
He said it was impossible yesterday afternoon to know how many of the
1.73 million black students in South Africa
joined the boycott, which also protested the deployment of police
and army units in black areas torn by 13 months of riots against white
rule.
Studentstrikes became a popular form of protest against apartheid in
early 1984.
Ehie icht aun 1Ba i
Vol XCVI- No.21
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the Fall and Winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April - $18.00 in Ann Arbor; $35.00 outside the city. One term -
$10.00 in town; $20.00 out of town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and Sub-
scribes to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles
Times Syndicate, and College Press Service.

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PIONEER THE FUTURE

;

Join us in creating the next generation of
technological wonders. Find out more at the
Hughes Career Opportunity Presentation
Hughes representatives will be on campus to meet
EE, ME, Computer Science, Physics or Engineering
Systems majors:

I

Thursday, October 3
12:30-1:30 pm
Chrysler Center, Room 143

Editor in Chief...................NEIL CHASE
Opinion Page Editor............ JOSEPH KRAUS
Managing Editors..........GEORGEA KOVANIS
JACKIE YOUNG
News Editor ................THOMAS MILLER
Features Editor..............LAURIE DELATER
City Editor ................. ANDREW ERIKSEN
Personnel Editor ............. TRACEY MILLER
NEWS STAFF: Jody Becker, Laura Bischoff, Nancy
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Markon, Eric Mattson, Amy Mindell, Kery Mura-
kami, Christy Reidel, Stacey Shonk, Katie Wilcox.
Magazine Editor ............RANDALL STONE
Arts Editor .....................CHRIS LAUER
Associate Arts Editors ............ JOHN LOGIE
Movies .BYRON L. BULL
Records ........... BETH FERTIG

Sports Editor...................TOM KEANEY
Associate Sports Editors..............JOE EWING
BARB McQUADE, ADAM MARTIN,
PHIL NUSSEL, STEVE WISE
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Borowsky, Emily Bridgham, David Broser, Debbie
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Goodman, Joh Hartmann, Steve Herz, Rich Kaplan,
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Morgan, Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis, Mike Redstone,
Scott Shaffer, Howard Solomon.
Business Manager...........DAWN WILLACKER
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DISPLAY SALES: Sheryl Biesman, Diane Bloom,
Gayla Brockman, Debbie Feit, Jennifer Heyman,
GrLeacI h...ebra Lederr. Beh l. i ,A. Sue .

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