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September 30, 1985 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-09-30

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 30, 1985

BUSINESS

'U' program aids

U.S. exports

By MISUN DAWKINS
The University has created a
program to help American industry
learn a little from the Japanese way
of doing business.
The East Asia Business Education
program is a cooperative project bet-
ween the School of Business Ad-
ministration and the Center for
Japanese Studies. The new project's
goal is to increase graduate business
;students' and company executives'
foreign language fluency as well as
their knowledge of international ex-
port activity.
THE EAST Asia program offers a
,double masters program consisting of
'a masters in Asian studies and an
M.B.A. in International Business.
According to John Campbell, direc-
tor of the Center for Japanese Studies,
the Chinese and Japanese companies,

unlike the Americans, monitor inter-
national activity to forecast future
levels of competition.
Campbell feels American
businesses can successfully compete
with Asian firms if they focus on long-
range rather than short range plan-
ning. By gathering concrete data and
monitoring Asian export activities,
American firms can learn to follow a
long-term schedule.
IN AN ATTEMPT to help American
firms make that transition, the
program offers courses, and seminars
such as "Introductory Japanese for
Business" and "Quality Control Prac-
tices in Japanese and American Fir-
ms." The program also offers sum-
mer internships working within
Japanese firms.
EAST ASIA program associate Schon
Beechler, who participated in the in-

ternship program to Japan last sum-
mer, explained the difference bet-
ween American short-term analysis
and Asian long-term industrial
projection. A long-term outlook, he
said enables Asian firms to keep an
"eye on the survival of the company,
rather than short-term profitability."
In working for the Sumitomo Metals
Corporation, she said that the
Japanese see their country on top now
in the steel industry and Americans in
the dump. But she felt that in another
10 years American firms will return to
their leading position in the steel in-
dustry. She said the Japanese are
preparing for the change now.
In addition, she learned to com-
municate with the Japanese effec-
tively, by understanding the way they
think.
Campbell says the Asian business

Former employee sues MichCo,
uncovers destroyed records

DETROIT (UPI) - A former
Michigan Consolidated Gas Co.
executive said MichCon destroyed
documents when it fired 300 em-
bloyees in 1983, altered some person-
nel records and hired a private in-
vestigator to follow a dismissed
worker who sued the company for age
discrimination.
The Detroit Free Press reported
yesterday that Susan Keller, a former
PUT US TO THE
TEST!

MichCon executive personnel director
who helped carry out the dismissals in
January 1983, described the firings in
a deposition given in a age
discrimination lawsuit filed by Dante
Bianco against MichCon.
BIANCO, who was 58 when he was
dismissed, had been with the com-
pany for 18 years as the employee
recreational activities director. His'
suit is underway in Wayne County
Circuit Court.
In an Aug. 1 deposition, Keller said
BLODM COUNTY
Watch for it in,

she and other executives who planned
the firings understood that the
documents related to planning the
dismissals, "that could be
damaging," would be destroyed.
She said MichCon purchased a
paper-shredder for that purpose.
KELLER SAID MichCon also
rewrote documents that explained the
reasons why some employees were
fired. She said the firm's fear of being
sued prompted that action.
In testimony, Keller also said that
MichCon hired a privated investigator
to follow Bianco, in an effort to
determine whether Bianco had
"vulnerabilities" in character, credit,
whatever" that could be questioned
by MichCon lawyers during a
deposition by Bianco.
MichCon stopped the investigation,
Keller said, on the advice of one of its
lawyers, but that another detective
was later hired to again follow Bian-
co.
The former executive personnel
director said the reason for the firing
was "simply money. The ratio of
labor costs to sales was inappropriate
for MichCon's profit protections."
A MichCon spokesman said the
company has no comment on the case
because it is under litigation.
I UO-

and language training in the double
masters program prepares a student
or American executive in Asian
business techniques that can be ap-
plied to American business.
The funding for this program comes
from the School of Business Ad-
ministration and from the Center for
Chinese Studies in conjunction with
the Michigan Department of Com-
merce.
Career Planning &
Placement
Recruiting Schedule
The follo wing employers and
representatives from
graduate/professional schools
will be on campus to conduct in-
terviews. The following is the
schedule for the next three
weeks.
September 30 and October 1
Inmont
October 3
National Starch & Chemical Co.
October 3
Arby's Inc.
LimitedExpress
October 7
Kennedy School of Gov't/Public
Policy Program
Michigan Citizens Lobby
October 8
Atlantic Richfield
National Bank of Detroit
Signal Research Center, Inc.
Texaco
October 9
Michigan Citizens Lobby
Monsanto
October 10
Chevron
Cullinet
Electronic Data Systems
Monsanto
Procter & Gamble
October 11
Chevron
Procter & Gamble
October 14
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology/Lincoln Laboratory
Mutual of Omaha
Upjohn
Contact the Career Planning
& Placement Office for more
information.
'Because you never
get a second chance ...
to make a
first impression. "
CAREER
DIMENSIONS
COMPLETE RESUME SERVICE
M.A. CAREER COUNSELING
JANET B. ROBINSON
761-2458
321 South Main
Suite 210

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
Hurricane death toll rises to 11
Hurricane Gloria's death toll climbed to 11 yesterday and millions of
dollars in damage to New England's apple crop was added to the storm's
legacy of destruction as crews worked to restore power to more than 1
million customers.
Among those killed was a Rhode Island man who was struck by the
boom of his 30-foot sailboat at anchor during the storm, police said.
Some businesses, already hit with property damage in scattered cities
in Rhode Island and in Cape May County, N.J., reported incidents of
looting. Officials reported 10 arrests in Rhode Island.
Over 600,000 customers on the East coast remained without power two
days after Gloria roared from North Carolina to Maine.
"The power thing is really the problem," said Larry DeBear,
spokesman for Conn. Gov. William O'Neill. "It really has a ripple affect
that involves almost every aspect of life you can think of and that's what
the real problem is.
Ship spills oil on Del. River
MARCUS HOOK, Pa. - A Panamanian tanker went aground south of
here, opening a hole that spilled oil over the surface of the Delaware
River for more than eight miles, officials said yesterday.
Crews were busy yesterday cleaning up the spill from the Grand Eagle,
a 761-foot tanker, U.S. Coast Guard and Sun Oil Co. officials said.
The ship lost about 435,000 gallons, or the equivalent of 10,376 barrels, of
crude oil after running aground about 11:30 p.m. Saturday near
Claymont, Del., U.S. Coast Guard spokesman Lt. Robert Mitchell said.
The oil first stretched shore-to-shore for up to three miles, then broke up
into narrow strips over an eight- to nine-mile stretch of the river from
near Marcus Hook to the Delaware Memorial Bridge, south of
Wilmington, Del., the Coast Guard said.
Mitchell said any spill of more than 100,000 gallons is considered a
major spill, but he said the environmental impact of the accident was un-
clear.
The ship proceeded to its destination, the Sun Oil Co. refinery in Marcus
Hook, and was no longer leaking oil by 4:30 a.m., Coast Guard officials
said.
Cleanup, monitored by the Coast Guard and other agencies, will take
days, Mitchell said.
Coast Guard Capt. Edward Roe established a "safety zone" in the area
of the spill yesterday meaning no vessels could enter the area without his
permission as captain of the Port of Philadelphia, Mitchell said.
U.S. cracks down on espionage
WASHINGTON - Fueled by recent spy cases, pressure is building on
the Reagan .administration to crack down on espionage by reducing the
number of Soviet bloc officials allowed to live in the United States, and
the number of security clearances given to U.S. military personnel.
Of the approximately 2,500 Soviet and East European officials in
America, former FBI officials estimate that 33 percent to 40 percent are
spies.
"The other 60 percent would cooperate if called on to do so," said
Raymond Wannall, former assistant FBI director in charge of intelligen-
ce operations.
The armed services and defense contractors appear to be meeting
Defense Secretary Caspar Weinbergr's three-month goal of reducing
security clearances by 10 percent.
Final figures on the crackdown, which grew out of a Navy spy scandal,
are not expected until next month. But Weinberger's deadline for an
across-the-board, 10 percent reduction in clearances expires today and
some preliminary figures have been compiled.
When the cuts were ordered June 11, there were 4.3 million Pentagon
employees, congressional aides and contractor employees with clearan-
ces ranging from Confidential to Top Secret.
S. African mob kills black man
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - A mob burned a black man to
death yesterday in the second straight day of clashes between rival black
groups near Durban, and anti-apartheid violence spilled into white areas
for the third day in a row, police said.
Police also reported they shot and killed a black man heaving a
gasoline bomb in Dordecht in eastern Cape Province.
An explosion that police believed was caused by a bomb went off in the
men's room of a hotel near Durban where about 150 black youngsters
were guests at a "children's day," but no one was injured.
Peter Davidson, owner of the Executive Hotel in Umlazi, a black town-
ship west of Durban, told The Associated Press: "We don't know who
would have done it. Iam not involved in politics."
However, local Zulus and sources within Inkatha, the million-strong
Zulu political movement, said Davidson is one of the more than 100 mem-
bers of the Inkatha central committee, which advises hereditary Zulu
Chief Gatsha Buthelezi. The sources spoke on condition of anonymity.
Sikhs take office in Punjab
CHANDIGARH, India - Punjab's new chief executive and five other
Sikh Cabinet ministers took the oath of office yesterday wearing bullet-
proof vests and pledging to "heal the wounds" of terrorism and

repression.
Thousands of armed police and paramilitary troops sealed off the
governor's mansion as Chief Minister Surjit Singh Barrala and the other
ministers were sworn in for days after their Akali Dal party swept to vic-
tory in the most heavily guarded state election in Indian history.
The election restored local administration in this Sikh-dominated state
after two years of federal rule imposed when local authorities failed to
curb terrorism.
CZ r £*thpan ? ai g
Vol XCVI - No. 18
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the Fall and Winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April - $18.00 in Ann Arbor; $35.00 outside the city. One term -
$10.00 in town; $20.00 out of town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and Sub-
scribes to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles
Times Syndicate, and College Press Service.

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THE W O R L D

THINKING ABOUT A
BUSINESS
DEGREE?
IF SO, COME TO-
AN INFORMATIONAL SESSION
PRESENTED BY
THE BUSINESS SCHOOL
Place:
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Study around the world, visiting Japan, Korea,
Taiwan, Hong Kong, Sri Lanka, India, Egypt,
Turkey, Greece and Spain. Our 100 day voyages sail
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The S.S. UNIVERSE is a 500 passenger American-
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i

Editor in Chief ................... NEIL CHASE
Opinion Page Editor...........JOSEPH KRAUS
Managing Editors..........GEORGEA KOVANIS
JACKIE YOUNG
News Editor...............THOMAS MILLER
Features Editor ...:..........LAURIE DELATER
City Editor ................ ANDREW ERIKSEN
Personnel Editor ..............TRACEY MILLER
NEWS STAFF: Jody Becker, Laura Bischoff, Nancy
Driscoll, Carla Foz, Rachel Gottlieb, Sean Jackson,
David Klapman, Vibeke Laroi, Carrie Levine, Jerry
Markon, Eric Mattson, Amy Mindell, Kery Mura-
kami, Christy Reidel, Stacey Shonk, Katie Wilcox.
Magazine Editor ............. RANDALL STONE
Arts Editor .................... CHRIS LAUER
Associate Arts Editors.............JOHN LOGIE
Movies....................BYRON L. BULL
Records ..................... BETH FERTIG

Sports Editor ................... TOM KEANEY
Associate Sports Editors............. JOE EW ING
BARB McQUADE, ADAM MARTIN,
PHIL NUSSEL, STEVE WISE,
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha, Eda BenjakulMark
Borowsky, Emily Bridgham, David Broser, Debbie
deFrances, Joe Devyak, Rachel Goldman, Skip
Goodman, Joh Hartmann, Steve Herz, Rich Kaplan,
Mark Kovinsky, John Laherty, Scott Miller, Brad
Morgan, Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis, Mike Redstone,
Scott Shaffer, Howard Solomon.
Business Manager...........DAWN WILLACKER
Sales Manager ............ MARY ANNE HOGAN
Assistant Sales Manager...............YUNA LEE
Marketing Manager..........CYNTHIA NIXON
Finance Manager.............. DAVID JELINEK
DISPLAY SALES: Sheryl Biesman, Diane Bloom,
Gayla Brockman, Debbie Feit, Jennifer Heyman,
Greg Leach, Debra Lederer, Beth Lybik, Sue Me-

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