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September 23, 1985 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-09-23

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4

The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 23, 1985 - Page 6

Comic books and th-th-that's not all

By MONICA WARDEN
Robin: "Holy superheros, Batman. I've never seen so
many comic books in all my life."
Batman: "My bat sensors agree with you, boy wonder. I
guess that's why they call this the King Kon Comic and
Fantasy Convention."
NO, THE MASKED marvels didn't really make an ap-
pearance at this weekend's extravaganza in Eastern
Michigan University's McKinney Union. In fact, they
probably didn't revvv up the Batmobile or even leave the
Batcave.
But if they weren't there in body, they were definitely
there in spirit, and in comic books.
Comic-crazed devotees waded through the stacks of vin-
tage Richie Rich, Spiderman, and Bugs Bunny. There was
nary a Time or Newsweek to be seen.

Who ever said comics were for kids? Most of the collec-
tors browsing through the books were college-aged an4;
up. They were actually there to do busines - buying,
trading, and selling magazines at prices that could put
some through college. Would you pay $60 for a Bugs Bun-

I

ny bonanza?
But comic collectors weren't the only ones having fun.
Dungeons and Dragons players picked up a few games.
Videos of those old Saturday matinee serials our parents
grew up with - Dr. Who and Dick Tracey - were shown
throughout the weekend. o

_y

- A
And it wasn't all superhero adventure. There were some
pretty serious discussions on topics such as "Shou1C
comics have high moral standards?"
Well, should they? Maybe the dynamic duo could
provide some insight on that question.

sf

Swiss revise marria

Daily Photo by ANDI SCHREIBER
Gorillas "Dave" and, of course, "Dave" hang out in the Diag.
Ambitious apes make curious comeback

By MARY CHRIS JAKLEVIC
Dave and Dave the friendly
gorillas returned to campus Friday
to welcome students and faculty
back to school and to encounter
some celebrated University figures.
The Daves are part of an improm-
ptu trio of warm-hearted an-
thropoids who appeared on campus
twice last winter semester to lift the
spirits of everyone who crossed their
path.
SADLY, though, the Daves retur-
ned minus their better third, Dave
the gorilla, who they said was in
Paris for the semester but would be
back to his usual antics with the
other Daves next term.
But Dave's absence was quickly
forgotten Friday afternoon, when
the other two Daves showed up on
the Diag.
At 2 p.m. the gregarious, gorillas,
emerged, prepared for the hot
weather in shorts, sneakers, and t-
shirts. But their furry heads and
hands were pure gorilla garb.
AS USUAL, they went ape, at-
tacking students with unreserved
gorilla greetings. They climbed
trees, told forgettable jokes, and
even sang Let's Go Blue.
After minglingon the Diag, the
Daves romped ove- to greet Jim, the
latest preacher to grace the Diag
green. Jim was lecturing to several
hundred students about the
sacrilege of homosexuality.
DAVE AND Dave's arrival on the
scene evoked cheers and applause
as the Daves shook hands and
saluted the members of the crowd.

who shouted, "Darwin! Darwin!"
Finally the playful primates ap-
proached Jim himself, but the over-
zealous intruders did not quite hit it
off with him. "That's what you get
for masturbation," Jim told the
crowd when offered Dave's fur-clad
hand.
But Dave and Dave were undaun-
ted by the put-down. "We're too
simple to have religion on our min-
ds. We're just interested in having a
good time," Dave said.
NEXT DAVE and Dave brought
their monkey business to Angell
Hall, where they descended upon an
Art History 101 lecture in
Auditorium A. They wer a bit disap-
pointed with the reaction of the
class, though. "The students were
too shocked. They were unwilling to
accept new ideas," Dave said.
The apes decided to go where they
would be better received. They
visited the LSA offices on the first
floor, where they were recognized
by workers who remembered them
from their visit last spring.
Monica Dillon, a clerk in the coun-
seling office, pulled out a cloth rose
from her desk drawer which the
apes had given her on their previous
visit. "They're nice guys," she said.
THE GORILLAS prowled from of-
fice to office, greeting old friends
with back massages and pawshakes.
The afternoon ended with a visit to
President Shapiro's office. Unfor-
tunately, the President was tied up
in a regent's meeting, and even the
Daves' charming monkeyshines
could not disarm the receptionist in
his office.

Dave and Dave are friendly with
everybody, but they pay special at-
tention to the women. Could they be
in it for the girls?
"SURE, WE'RE swinging
gorillas," Dave said.
"Girls like us because we're dif-
ferent," added Dave.
One female senior confirmed
Dave's assertion. "I think he's
really cute," she said. "I don't
usually like guys that hairy, though.
I'd like to know what he's doing
tomorrow night."
ASKED when they would return,
the Daves said, "We'll be back when
we feel the public really needs us,
when people seem down and tense."
Mystery still shrouds the origin of
this new species of campus creature.
The Daves are fearful of revealing
too much about themselves, but did
admit they are LSA juniors, and also
the only gorillas not in captivity in
North America.
What about their long term
aspirations?
WHILE DAVE wants to be a
physician and a rock star, Dave said
he is interested in politics and law.
and thinks the words "Senator
Dave the Gorilla" have quite a ring
to them.
They said the third Dave is in-
terested in screen writing.
For now the Daves are content to
run a successful campaign against
melancholia on campus. "We know
we have a lot of fans," Dave said.
"We want to start a Dave the Gorilla
fan club, and we will be producing t-
shirts." Can Dave the Gorilla lunch
boxes be far behind?

BERN, Switzerland (AP) - Swiss
voters yesterday approved a new
marriage law to replace 78-year-old
legislation that the government
described as "incompatible with
female dignity" because it gave the,
husband sweeping legal power over
his wife.
Official returns from Switzerland's
26 cantons showed 921,593 voters, or
54.7 percent, approved the law and
762,962, or 45.3 percent, opposed it.
About 40 percent of Switzerland's
nearly 3 million voters cast ballots.
Sunday's approval came 14 years
after Switzerland became the last
Western democracy to grant women

the right to vote and four years after
an equal rights amendment was
passed.
The old marriage law made the
husband the legal "head of the
family" with the wife automatically
losing her surname upon marriage,
allowed the husband to prevent his
wife from working, and gave him the
right to manage his wife's pre-
marriage savings and whatever she
inherited.
To replace it, a package of
measures stressing "partnership in
marriage" was approved by
Parliament in 1984. It dropped
references to the husband as head of

oe laws r
the family, decision-maker and finan-
cial manager. r1
Thenew law pledges husband ahde1
wife to "harmonious cooperation."
Spouses are to agree between ther-
selves how to divide financial and
other responsibilities. l;j
It also obliges each partner to given
the other information on incorre2
property, and debts. Children still are
required to take the father's surname,,
but the wife may put her maidenri
name before her husband's name..
Opponents forced a nationwideZ
referendum on the legislation -by-
collecting 86,000 signatures in sijx
months,

Hospital head resigns, will

(Continued from Page 1)
HIS ACCOMPLISHMENTS here
were cited by E. Don Walker,
President of Administration of the
Hermann Hospital Estate, as a major
factor in the hospital's desire to hire
him.
"Dr. Dalston is the right man at the
right time," Walker said in a
prepared statement. "He is one of the
outstanding chief executive officers in
the country, and carries with him a
reputation of sound leadership and ef-
fective management."
A native of Longview, Texas,
Dalston, was out of town for the
weekend and could not be reached for
comment.
Dr. George Zuidema, University
vice provost for medical affairs, said
that Dalston "felt he had completed
his job here, with the approval and
construction of the RHP. I don't
believe he was dissatisfied with
anything here."
"There are a lot of changes going on

in the whole health industry'
Zuidema said.
Julian Byrd, a department director
who served on the committee that
selected Dalston, said that the Texas
hospital is hoping Dalston can make
significant improvements in its public
relations and its ties with the Univer-
sity of Texas Medical Center.
Dalston was one of four hospital
administrators chosen by the Texas
hospitals to be interviewed for the
position of chief executive officer, and
their first choice to take the job after
the interviews were completed in
July.
"His tremendous record attracted
us to him initially, but when he was
here for the interviews, his ability to
relate to everyone on the committee
was very important," said Byrd.
"His maturity and charm were cer-
tainly part of the decision," Byrd
said.
Byrd said the committee did not
know Dalston was a native Texan

go to Texas:
before they selected him, but "now,
that we have chosen him, i i
something we are happy about."
Dalston was offered the position
several weeks ago, but final
negotiations were not completed unti
last week, Byrd said. 72
Hermann Hospital is a private, ot-
for-profit teaching hospital which. is
closely affiliated with the University,
of Texas Medical School.
Zuidem a will recom mend ..
replacement for Dalston to Shapvi'oy
and the Board of Regents. He said no
decision has been made as to howsr i c
search will be conducted.
In a prepared statement, Dalsjgt f
stated, "Being at the University of
I ichigan has been one of the greatest
opportunities of my life. It has been a
marvelous experience to work withl#
bright, energetic, dedicated people at,
the hospitals, the Medical Center,,the.
University and with the volunteers,_
alumni, and the many strong suppor-
ters external to the University."

111IE

I

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

PERSONAL

HELP WANTED

1977 TOYOTA CORONA - 4 door, automatic,
power brakes, 62,000 miles. $1400. 662-4044.
98B0927
TECHNICS 35 WATT/CHANNEL stereo receiver.
Excellent condition, barely used. Two bookshelf
speakers included. $150. Call Sharon at 662-4044.
99B0927

HONDA AERO - Must sell. $650 or best offer.
973-1220. 55B0927
'78 CHEVETTE. '79 engine, automatic. Runs well.
$900. 485-2148. 64B0923
ROUND TRIP FLIGHT to PHOENIX. December
24 to January 7. ONLY $250. Call 662-9146. 87B0926

WANTED: Inexpensive, used printer. Call Bill
761-9234 leave message. 79B0925
1978 RENAULT Le Car. 50,000 miles. Little
rust. Runs great, looks good. Gas saver. $900.00
995-2494 after 5:00. dBtc
BIKE - Red Raleigh. New wheels, grip, lock and
cable. Small bike $50 or reasonable offer. Cindy
761-6545 after 5 p.m. NCB0925
1977 CHEVY IMPALA - Power brakes and
steering, air. Roomy and reliable. $625. Call
994-5815. 84B0927
IS IT TRUE You Can Buy Jeeps for $44 through
the U.S. government? Get the facts today! Call 1-
312-742-1142. Ext. 1137A. 7711101
1979 FORD MUSTANG v6. AC, AM/FM 50,029
miles. $2,900.761-9108 after 4:30 p.m. 76B0925
1973 BUICK must sell $300 or best offer. Karl
761-6740. 74B0924

DAILY CROSSWORD PUZZLE
Edited by Trude Michel Jaffe

ACROSS
1 Fountain order
5 Squeal
9 Writer's
problem
14 Bauxite and
hematite
15 Painter
Bonheur
16'Young
Montague
17 Sachs of
Nurnberg
18 Kiln
19 Liner's domain
20 In a position of
eminence
23 Clarets
24 Very old: Abbr.
25 Trattoria
specialties
28 Gas guzzler
30 Greek peak
34 Willow
35 Artist Thomas
- Benton
36 Letter on a key
37 Standing
between
extremes
41 Daisy-
42 Club funds
43 Task
44 Linemen
46 Govt. org.
47 Does a kitchen
job
48 EDT follower
50 Certain bog
contents
51 Way to the
top?
59 Uncanny

3 Fender blemish
4 Various
5 Sulks
6 Dawdles
7 Helper,
for short
8 English spa
9 Tiara's cousin
10 Elaborate art
style
11 USA
12 Dinner
13 "On Golden
21 Singer Bailey
22 Planet
25 French apple
26 Chinese, e.g.
27 Did a construc-
tion job
28 Sidewalk spots
29 Crafts'
companions
31 Part of a place
setting
32 Glass fragment
33 Paraprofes-
sionals
35 Time of day
38 Novelist
Wharton

39 Brilliance
40 Aristotle work
45 Descendant of
Shem
47 Common
comparative
49 Beef on the
hoof
50 Social grace
51 Notable
achievement

52
53
54
55
56
57

Depend (on)
Certain exam
Fold dwellers
Cotton quantity
Encore!
"It Came

a Midnight
Clear"
58 Confined

FOR RENT

1979 CAMARO BERLINETTA. Asking $3,600 or
best offer. v-8, automatic, 8-track, AC. Call
995-0320 after 6 p.m. 37F0926
WORKSHOP FOR SINGLE MEN AND WOMEN.
September 27-29. "Creating New Relationships."
Residential experential skill - practice weekends
with Bob Blood Ph.D., Margaret Blood M.A. $35
registration plus sliding scale professional fee.
769-0046. 52F0926
YOUR ORGANIZATION
NEED MONEY?
Campus group needed to sell 1985-86 Student
Directories.
Liberal Commission
Easy Selling
Call Nancy McGlothlin at Student Publications,
764-0550, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., M-F.
WRITERS' BLOCK
CURED
Send $2 for catalog of over 16,000 topics
to assist your writing efforts and help you
defeat Writers' Block. For info., call TOLL-
FREE 1-800-621-5745. (In Illinois, call 31 2-
922-0300) Authors' Research, Rm. 600-N
407 S. Dearborn, Chicago, IL 60605.
STUDENT SERVICES
BIKE REPAIR - Tired of leaving your bike at
other shops for weeks at a time? We guarantee
One Day Repair Service. Student Bike Shop 607
S. Forest at S. University. 662-6986 next to
village Corner. 33G0926
FOREIGN STUDENTS: Recently Published,
GUIDE TO GREENCARD FROM F/J/H/M VISAS.
Free details: Immigration Publications, P.O. Box
515991, Dallas, TX 75251. 02G0925

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
R AJ AS R IG A W A RE
ELUDE ARAP I FAT
MAN ON TELEGRAPH
SIGNALED ALERTS
LITA OREL
G RE SE S A SL EEP A T
ROD STORM SHIA
A U R A ST AS S RT
S TU B TA N TE N EA
S E ME ST ER AC CE S S
T H AR F LA T
P HO0TO0N DE F IN IT E
H E L IOG RAM PO0S E R
SR AN N M NI S E T T
TO0N G S A AR E S SE S
9/21185

THE FOREST APARTMENTS - One efficiency
now for rent. Includes heat and water. Completely
furnished. For more information 483-7232 or
996-3582. 54C0930
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED. Share double in
3 bedroom bi-level apartment. 3 blocks from both
Medical and Central. $179/month. Call evenings
357-3219. 82C0925
DORM DOINGS
Off Campus
Students
consider the advantages of on-campus dining in UM Resi-
dential Halls...
" THREE MEAL PLANS TO CHOOSE FROM!
" TEN CONVENIENT LOCATIONS TO CHOOSE FROM!
" SPECIAL DISCOUNTS WITH ENTREE PLUS!
We have a meal plan for your style. Come to
11 3 SAB (the Entree Office) today. or
phone 763-4632.

ARE YOU FRENCH? Do you like children and
need part-time work? Couple seek in-house help
with two bi-lingual children from December 1985 -
June 1986. Details: 995-2053. 02H0927
PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANT - male
quadriplegic. Weekday mornings, supper time,
weekend mornings. Must be punctual. Some
medical experience. Beginning now. Paul, 662-4619
(after 4p.m.) 97H0927
FOREIGN STUDENT needs tutoring assistance
in compositional writing on diverse topics for
graduate level course. Price negotiable. Reply:
P.O. Box No. 3536, Ann Arbor, 48106. 03111004
SITTER WANTED: 3:30-5:30 Mondays and Wed-
nesdays. Burns Park area. Car preferred. Call
994-5219. Pays well. 94H1004
CREW COACH - part time novice women's
coach. Coaching experience helpful. Strongrowing
background is a must. Afternoons and weekends.
Salary negotiable. Call 663-5786. Leave a message.
96H0925
WANTED: A group of students to help with
national fund raising campaign. Pick-up extra
cash. Will fit any schedule. Meeting at Angell #2231,
Sept. 24, 8:00-9:00 p.m. 70110924
WANTED - Bus boys for luncheon/dinner at the
mudbowl. Call Scott 668-8949. 68H0924
MEDICAL ASSISTANT. Physician's office, family
practice and weight reduction. Nursing major or
minor preferred. Part time, Ypsilanti. 483-8338.
73111001
HOUSECLEANING. 1 year experience. 761-9040
Caren. Graduate students preferred. 71H1001
BUSBOYS NEEDED by sorority lunches and/or
dinners. Call 761-1220. 83H0925
BUS HELP WANTED in Sorority House. Set up
and waiters. 5-7 p.m. 996-8313. 80H1002
"HARDEE'S, HIRING for all shifts. $50 bonus
for day employees after 30 days of work when you
'bring in this ad. Benefits include free uniforms,
paid breaks, discount meals, and terrific working
environment. See manager at 175 N. Maple for
more details." 43H0926
MAUDE'S RESTAURANT seeking energetic,
hard working individuals for part time line cook,
pantry and dish positions. Will pay for experience
or train the right person. Please apply between
2-5 p.m., 314 S. Fourth Avenue, Ann Arbor.
39H0927
WANTED - 2 high energy seniors or juniors to
sell customized sportswear to fraternities and
sororities, can earn $150/evening. CallHBecky
484-4768. 61x0923
SUMMER JOBS! National Park Co.'s. 21 Parks -
5,000+ Openings. Complete Information $5.00.
Park Report. Mission Mountain Company 651 2nd
Avenue WN, Kalispell, MT 59901. 74H0927
PEOPLE LOOKING for PART TIME jobs. 16 to
32 hours a week. Call State Security at 668-0447
for information. Excellent for students. 13H0925
DELIVERY DRIVERS NEEDED - part time
shifts available, days and nights. Call China on the
Run at 994-3151. 36H0925
nrnnv om.. vv- TT. \'¢T_ . .... ..i., t . -

MUSICAL MDSE
STEREOS, ETC.

STEREO: Technics turntable, Sansui receiver,.-
micro-acoustic speakers. Only $250. Call Katie
662-8607. 00N1001

BUSINESS SERVICES&
PARKING-CAMPUS: South University and Forestx
761-9635 or 761-7400. 95J0104
A CUT ABOVE HAIR DESIGN - Special $5 off
any service, first visit only. Call 662-2544 for ap-
pointment. cJtc
SANDI'S TYPING & WORD PROCESSING
:" 20% Discount - 1st paper! !
Fast & accurate. Papers, briefs, resumes, letters,
theses. Campus pick-up & delivery. 426-521'
THE NEW SCHOOL OF PIANO '
First lesson complimentary. 994-0371
cJ1211
TYPING - ALL KINDS - Fast, efficient service.
Reasonable rates. Laurie, 973-1592. cJtc,'
Papers/Resumes/Coverletters
EXECU-TOPS Word Processing 663-7158 '."
c tp

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

u .

MISCELL ANEOUS
FREE HIDE-A-BED couch. Yellow, vinyl. 6'4 4
You musthaul. 995-0636. 78M092O
SPARE ROOM? Student-artist needs compli-
mentary studio. Will consider any offer. John
761-8048. 48M0M ,

[17JI

6 7 8 91
16
19
22
24

110 11 12 13

TICKETS

HELP WANTED

21

PERSONAL

WANTED: Student to "baby sit" our van during
home football games. Call after 6p.m. 626-0048.
93H0103
1I I lI IA UT1n I

M VS. MARYLAND! 2 seats together, section~27
Call John 764-3670, noon-midnight. Best offer by
Friday night wins. NCQ0927 *
a
WANTED: Football tickets for Maryland game.
Call NOW - Jim 663-3873. 86Q0926 '
SELLING: Maryland - Michigan football tickets.
Reasonable prices. Call JIM 663-3823. 5Q0926
FACE VALUE tickets for sale - Maryland,°
Wisconsin.Indiana.Purdue ONLY. 973-9582.

Z7

i

M 1S Z9
35

STUDY IN PEACE and quiet - get ear plugs at
the VILLAGE APOTHECARY, 1112 S. University.

Is4~ I I

I

-.'- I I

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