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September 20, 1985 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-09-20
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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V V V V 3 3

The s
(Continued from Page 3) haQ
invented prior to its composer's win
crafty instrumental arrangement, sea
yet McCoy claimed that he had
never even seen anyone do it until he
wrote the song.
Although "The Hustle" wasT
clearly the pinnacle of its com-
poser's short-lived career, Van Mc- yea
Coy had been an extremely active son
music industry figure for many tun
years, writing and producing hits for of b
such artists as Gladys Knight and fro,
the Pips, The Shirelles, Peaches and sold
Herb, David Ruffin, and Melba "Is
Moore. ran
Backed by "The Hustle's sales of lice
six million, McCoy launched an do.
enormous global tour in 1975 with his i
Soul City Symphony. He was joined Ter
by several of his former colleagues, "Se
such as Ruffin, Moore, and Faith, hiti
Hope & Charity. a p
Van McCoy died of a cardiac spe
arrest on July 6th, 1979; he was 38- hea
years-old. Tan

-IF

A ~ AAAA.AW..i

V

IWWW WWKK
We had joy, we had fun/we
d seasons in the sun/ but the
ne and the song, like the
sons, have all gone.
Ti'S 1985 and Terry Jacks is
cutting his first album in over 10
ars. Of course, the Canadian
gwriter has been extremely for-
ate in that he has had the luxury
being able to take such a hiatus
im his career. "After 'Seasons'
d 11 million copies," he explains,
said 'screw this noise.' I bought a
ch, a fishing boat, got a fishing
nse and did the things I wanted to
I you haven't guessed by now,
rry Jacks is the man behind
easons in the Sun;" a number-two
in 1974. The song was derived from
poem by Jacques Brel about a
nt old miner dying of a broken
art, written in a whorehouse in
ngiers. Jacks worked from an

types of songs. The '70s were
economically much fatter times,
and people ... they'd think more."
"Seasons in the Sun" was not the
first Jacks collaboration to hit the
pop charts. In 1970, he enjoyed a
number-one hit, "Which Way
You Going Billy," as the Poppy Family
- a duo composed of Jacks and his
wife, Susan. This song evoked the
fear and despair over the Vietnam
War.
When "Seasons in the Sun" was
first composed. Jacks intended it for
the Beach Boys. Jacks got in touch
with Al Jardine and went to Califor-
nia to stay at Brian Wilson's house.
They tried a few takes of the piece,
but as Jacks explains, "Brian
Wilson just wasn't into it. He went a
little crazy ... there was no guidan-
ce."
When asked how he feels about the
music of today, Jacks replied,
"We've gone too far ahead elec-
tronically. I think people are going
to want to get back to feeling. It's
nice to have fuck-ups. Things are too
constant now, it's really hard on you.
You used to be able to listen to it for
hours."

Jacks
... he had joy, he had fun

English translation by Rod McKuen,
changing the chorus and adding a lost
verse to make the song about a per-
son dying of leukemia from the per-
spective of a close friend.
When asked what could make such
a depressing theme an enormous
pop hit, Jacks suggested, "Those
were the '70s. People liked those

gr

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Of his material now being prepped
for solo release, Jacks said, "I've
utilized the electronics of today. It's
quite wild, quite neat.'" He adds, ",No
tear-jerkers."
Jacks will be appearing in the lead
role of a made-for-TV movie,
"Seasons in the Sun," for which he
has also composed the score.
Come a little closr/a little closer
now/when you gonna give me
some time, Sharona...
THEY WERE the next Beatles.
Everyone knew it. It just had to be.
For in the summer of 1979, The
Knack suddenly burst upon the
scene with one of the hottest singles
ever, "My Sharona." With its
twangy bassline and sharp rhythm,
the number-one single helped propel
their debut album, Get the Knack to
a gold record in 13 days, platinum in
seven weeks, and sales of five
million copies.
In time, though, the legend wore
thin. Their follow-up album, But the
Little Girls Understand, sold a
discouraging 600,000 copies. After
one more unsuccessful release and
constant bickering, the band broke
up in 1982.
But there's much more to the story
of the Knack than an initially im-
pressive bunch of statistics.
Singer/guitarist Doug Fieger star-
ted off in his native Detroit with a
band called Sky, which made two
albums on RCA. Fieger moved to
Los Angeles in 1971 where he got
caught up in the local music scene
and eventually assembled The
Knack out of some of his musical
associations.
The Knack became a favorite of
the L.A. club scene. During their live
shows The Knack were often joined
on stage by such names as Bruce
Springsteen, Tom Petty, and Ray
Manzarak. According to Scott
Bergstein, an original co-manager
of the band, the combined effect of
turn-away crowds and a general
hype about town led to bidding from
14 record companies. And it was
Capitol Records that eventually won
the goose which laid but one golden
egg.
When asked why The Knack was
able to make it so big, Bergstein
said, "It was a reaction. People
were real tired of disco. It was just
reaction against disco, dance music,
the whole progressive rock - people
wanted something real and fresh.
They were tired-of bands like Jour-
ney, Styxx, Emerson Lake and
Palmer-that whole progressive
rock scene."
Assto the downfall of the band,
Bergstein can see several factors at
play. "They probably couldn't han-
dle the success," he siad. "They just
did everything wrong. Not talking to
the press, TV or radio-it caught up
with them."
He explained, "You have to be
careful you don't alienate the rest of
the music industry like the Knack
did. This is a much more business-
like age. I would hope musicians
See page 8

1 m 1~ ---- -m
P7:VILLAGE1
tate St. CN
1no S. Forest at S. University 1
ng ton 1
Bring in this 1
coupon for 20%
1 off on the purchase
1E of a package of1
FRESH MEA T 1
NOT VALID FOR SALE ITEMS. 1
1 ( One coupon per purchase.'
Void after Sept. 26, 1985
9 .995-1818 I
.,PN: Sam 'til midnight every dayl
-now open until lam Fri &Sat nights I
mm=m==mm=mm m m -=mm mmmm - m -=- m

DESPERATELY
SEEKING SUSAN'S
FUTONS?
call her at
761-7858
EVENING STAR FUTONS

__C

In search o
A middle-aged woman wearing
three-inch rainbow high-heeled
shoes, explosive red pants, and
giant cookie-sized earrings walked
from table to table at Olga's Kitchen
(on State Street) last Friday telling
customers to put each of Olga's
three seasonings on their san-
dwiches. Now if some strange
woman came up to me and told me
how to season my Original Olga
(which is made with slices of lamb
on a special thick pita with lettuce,
tomato, and cheese) I'd tell her
exactly where she should stick a few
seasonings. But when the middle-
aged woman is Olga, and you're
about to bite into a sandwich she in-
vented, you don't stop to ponder your
relative like and dislike of the
restaurant's three sandwich flavor
enhancers; you simply shrug your
shoulders and follow orders. After
all it is Olga 'sKitchen.
Olga Loizon, the Olga, the lady
whose name you probably see three
or four times a day as you walk down
State Street, made a quick stop at
her Ann Arbor kitchen to provide a
bit of her own peculiar brand of
public relations, which included of
course, talking customers into
tryingsher three seasonings and
special Olga sauce. Public relations
for Olga means personal discussion
with the customers regarding the
restaurant's food and service, as
well as giving away free food.
On Friday Olga gave away three
Olga hot-dogs and an Original Olga
to a woman who, as Olga later ex-
plained, had recently arrived from
Mexico and was applying for a job at
the restaurant. The woman's three
children, each the proud recipient of
an Olga-dog, smiled and thanked
Olga. In fact, they smiled a lot, and
Olga smiled a lot, and our Daily
photographer took lots of pictures.
Swell. Now that's P.R. Olga also
begged me to have a sandwich and
after four no thank you's I succum-
bed to an Original Olga myself. I
smiled, Olga smiled, no pictures.
While wandering around the
restaurant to talk with customers
Olga came upon a couple that had
eaten at the original Olga's
restaurant in Birmingham,
Michigan back in 1970. Olga smiled,

Catch o
theP Day

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BOERSMA
TRAVEL
Call the
FRIENDLY
AGENT
Ask about our
Halloween trip
drawing.
BOERSMA TRAVEL
DOMESTIC
14 NICKELS ARCADE
Rte.994-6200

G.

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o o ,fiil
IIIIIM
Ilillll
IIIIIN
11@q
$125.OQ p k

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at the Michigan Theater

$125.00 '.x:

For today's active lifestyle.
Rugged as can be and water resistant also.
Two-tone case and bracelet.
Note sporty placement of crown.
OCITIZEN
The smartest engineering
ever strapped to a wrist.

Fri., Sept. 20
Sat., Sept. 21
7:30
9:30
Sun., Sept. 22
4:00
7:00
9:00

STOP MAKING SENSE (1984)
Dir. - JONATHAN DEMME
Back by popular demand! A fine con-
cert film showcasing the intellectual
rock group the Talking Heads, culled
from a trio of performances at Holly-
wood's Pantages Theatre, staged ex-
pressly for this film.
COUNTRY (1984)
Dir.-RICHARD PIERCE
Academy Award winner Jessica Lange
courageously fights to keep her family
united in the midst of the government's
forced foreclosure of their farm.

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WOLVERINES - THE
ONLY THING YOU NEED
TO KNOW ABOUT QUALITY
STEREO IS HIFI BUYS!

RALPH'S
MARKET
The Mini-Mart
Where you buy smart
FOOTBALL
SPECIALS
Kegs of Beer
our keg prices meet
or beat any in town
and
Party Trays
for 8 or more only
48 hr. notice, please
709 PACKARD
Open 10 a.m - 12a.m. Sun -Th
10 a m - 2 a.m. F-Sat
Football Saturday hrs 8a.m. - 2 a m

~ADS~
ALPINE.
car audio systema
Bang&Olufsen
CARVER
DCMA
GENESIS
Mintosh

Fri., Sept. 27 TWO FRIENDS AMONG FRIENDS
8:00 A special benefit performance by Con-
stance Barron and Judy Dow with the
Ann Arbor Chamber Orchestra. Tickets
are $25 per person. $20 for current
Michigan Theatre Members. Proceeds
go towards the Michigan Theatre Res-
toration Fund.
See all these great films projectea on the large screen in the historic
Michigan Theater. call 668-8397 for more information. Admission to
films is $3.00 for a double bill and $2.50 for a single bill. Admission
to the last film on a double bill is $2.50. Tickets go on sale one-half
hour before showtime.

NAD
Nakamichi
ortloon
signet
STAX
STEREO*
W SALES & SERVICE
618 S. Main
Ann Arbor
769-4700

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4 Weekend/Friday, September 20, 1985

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