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September 20, 1985 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-09-20

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OPINION

__

Page Friday, September 20, 1985 The Michigan Daily
MSAcontinues working tofillvacancy
In the wake of Michigan Student Assem- communication between internal commit- many as three varsity football games The dorm residents, as expected, were
bly Vice-president Micky Feusse's tee heads, and, as has been proposed recen- before they knew where their libraries hopping mad.
resignation two weeks ago, MSA has spent tly, overseeing the Committee on C hquips were. So now the University's housing office has
most of this week establishing a procedure Reorganization which is responsible for formed a committee to review its policy.
to replace her. suggesting and implementing structural He also expressed disapproval of a plan decide to ban kes
Although there was originally no means in .changes within MSA. Michigan athletic director Don Canham currently underway at Eastern Michigan fromth residencmmittee halls s dewho wins?
the MSA constitution to replace an In allowing Josephson to nominate two a veritable University institution himself, University in which raises for varsity f resdnce suwno w ins?
executive officer, the Assembly passed a people to fill the role, the Assembly con- confessed that he had once smoked coaches are determined by their teams Surely not the students, who will live inr
siderably widened the number of potential a , won and loss records. He noted that factors fear of their resident advisors and the beer
candidates. ampu Megeresd such as injuries and recruitment, which are Gestapo. Nor will the resident staff. Ask the
Former MSA representative Philip Cole In the sometimes candidsometimesear- beyond a coach's ability to control, can ob- housing staff if they'll enjoy patrolling par-
is considered one of the leading candidates. nest interview, Canham claimed that while scure an otherwise well-coached effort. ties to find kegs. Wrong again.
He has the backing of minority groups on illicit drug use was clearly present to some
campus. degree in the University athletic programs
Beyond Cole, Rackham student and for- it was certainly minimal in comparison to Keg purge 'Today next month
mer MSA representative Bruce Belcher ap- the degree of usage in the general com-
pears to be a leading candidate. Belcher munity.
resolution in its Sept. 10 meeting which has a great deal of experience with the He said that University athletes are sub-
permitted President Paul Josephson to Student Legal Services board, and has ser- jected to random "spot checks" for drug Roll out the barrel. . . Seriously, folks, In a curous demonstration of the
nominate a replacement who would be sub- ved on the Committe on Reorganization all usage anywhere from one to three times a roll out those barrels (or kegs if you prefer). paradoxes of time, Today show producers
ject to a two-thirds confirmation vote by the summer. Belcher said previously that he year. You see, the University's at it again. spent last week on campus filming the
was uninterested in the position because he yer
full Assembly.s d itothave the n satio b see Kegs, those wonderful fountains of malted background for a special to run next month.
This week, however, brought a new did not have the time necessary to serve as He added that he believed the bulk of the beverages that serve as the center of most A week ago, Today kicked of its college
wrinkle to the matter. At its Sept. 17 the sole vice-president. On Wednesday, athletes who used drugs did so for "ex- dormitory parties, seem to have fallen from extravaganza, which also features Brown
meeting, the Assemble passed a resolution when the possibility of a dual vice- perimentation" rather than as a habit. "It's grace with housing officials. University, by following LSA freshman
that would allow Josephson to select a pair presidency arose, he said, "I feel that I am mostly alcohol and marijuana being used, Past University policy has specified that Cindy Brown around campus.
of nominees who would together assume the well-qualified for the post." He added that not the most sophisticated drugs in there be no alcohol in public places. What Next month - that is, October 17- Today
vice-presidential duties. he would be willing to work 35-40 hours a America, he said. went on in a person's room was his business, will show some of last week's footage (and
The vice-president is responsible for week on MSA's behalf. He also said he would be in favor of retur- even if that business involved a keg of beer. presumably some of next week's) with
chairing the Board of Directors of Student itned as possible halves of a vice- ning to an NCAA-wide policy which would But a new policy at Couzens Hall that Bryant Gumbel himself calling the shots
Legal Services, overseeing the day to day incy include MSA pes enatves prohibit freshmen from playing in varsity bans kegs from the dorm could change from Ann Arbor.
operations of the MSA offices, ensuring presidency Nisd Darepresentatives competition. Noting that the former NCAA everything. Any poor lout found with a keg There's no official word on the rest of the
Lawrence Norris and Darryl Thompson' restriction was repealed largely through the in their room will be in trouble (except that shooting schedule, but Today will probably
Week in Review was compiled by and Rackham representative Daniel efforts of smaller schools, he pointed out nobody really knows what kind of trouble be here throughout the next month, if niot
Melendez. fot fsalrshos epitdot nbd elykoswa ido rul
Daily editors Neil Chase, Joseph Kraus, Josephson is scheduled to announce his that freshmen at schools such as Ohio State because the dorm has yet to specify the con- tomorrow, which never seemed to get in on
and Thomas Miller. nominee this fternoon, or Michigan State might have played in as sequences.) the act and always seems to be a day away
nomiee tis aternonanyway.

Edited and managed by students at The University of Michigan

AIL SMNE;

Vol. XCVI, No. 12

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Editorials represent a majority opinion of the Daily's Editorial Board

Missed opportunity

W HEN THE United Nations
turns 40 next month, the
organization won't have much to
celebrate. Once again, the U.N. is
being sadly proven as one of the
giant missed opportunities of the
20th century.
Created in the post World War II
spirit of international cooperation
and diplomacy, the U.N. suffers
tremendously due to the lack of
sincere, enthusiastic participation
of many powerful nations and,
now, big business.
This week, the U.N. held four
days of public hearings regarding
the involvement of multinational
corporations in South Africa. 1,068
multinational corporations iden-
tified by the U.N. as having a
minimum of 10 percent equity
holdings in South Africa were in-
vited to attend the hearings; all
declined.
The potential for information ex-
change and education on the issues
of apartheid, divestment, black
labor and the Sullivan principles,
and the impact of economic san-
ctions was tremendous, and is
exactly the type of forum the U.N.
was designed to facilitate.
Unfortunately, however, like so
many U.N. activities, the con-
ference was rendered a sort of
ideological silent movie - lots of
frenetic activity that no one will

ever hear about.
Clearly, big business seems to be
taking a cue from the attitude of
the Reagan administration which
has reinforced the idea among
western nations that the U.N. is
more trouble than it's worth.
During the Reagan Ad-
ministration, the United States has
pulled out of the U.N.'s
Educational, Scientific and
Cultural Organization, refused to
participate in the World Court's
Nicaraguan proceedings and has
recently announced to further
withdraw financial support.
Indeed, the U.N. has largely
deteriorated into an arena for Nor-
th-South/East-West bickering: the
advanced industrial nations vs.
the Third World, the Soviet bloc vs.
Western nations, and "everyone"
condemning South Africa and
Israel, and as President Reagan
sees it, the U.S.
The South Africa issue only ser-
ves to underscore a reality that has
haunted the promise of the U.N.
throughout the past four decades:
instead of having direct and vital
impact on exploring, mediating
and resolving the volitale issues of
our era, the U.N. is becoming an
increasingly irrelevant and im-
potent international body.
It's a say way to prove that a
body is a terrible thing to waste.

ROD CAW

57

LETTERS
Jordanian arms sale t

4192. HITS
N
210000000000,000
NATION AL r7xBt dE
hreatens region
s more likely due to AWAC-type fight on Capitol Hill
mon fear of Syria than should also realize that the U.S.-
esires for a negotiated Israel relationship will be un-
h Israel. Weapons to necessarily strained by pushing
11 not help to define who the combination arms sale/peace
considered legitimate process, which would be
tatives of the especially untimely as you have
ns for peace talks as an Israeli leader in office like
een an issue ever since Shimon Peres, who for many
on of the PLO by Egypt years has been considered a
in 1964 and is currently "dove" when it comes to
obstacle to future negotiating with the Arabs.
ns.
ally, in the 1970's, the There is no crime in wanting to
d until after Egypt en- advance the peace process and
nto direct peace secure relations with Middle
ns with Israel before Eastern nations, but arms sales
arms to the Egyptians. should not be looked at as ex-
arms are provided to pedience means for getting
before that country people to the negotiating tables,
ace with Israel, it would particularly if it goes againsti
nd incentive for King sound and consistent foreign
to enter into peace policy. While these weapons
ons. The Ken- might do a lot of politic
inz resolution, which "talking" for some people i
natures in the Senate, Washington, they would do a lot
this same principle more than "talk" on the bat-
be applied to Jordan - tlefields of the Middle East.
s without peace
ns. - Jeffrey Parness
people like Richard September 19
nd George Schultz who
ing up for another
by Berke Breathed

To the Daily:
I commend your equating of
the upcoming Jordanian arms
sale and President Reagan's visit
to Bitburg in your editorial en-
titled "Hollow Gesture" (Daily,
September 11). Both cases truly
are foot-in-the-mouth scenarios
as the President "swallowed" his
foot in visiting Bitburg and where
there is still time remaining to
"remove" the foot from his
mouth regarding the future arms
sale.
However, the editorial fails to
fully highlight the danger of the
pending arms sale to Jordan,
another case in which weapons
have become tools of diplomacy.
Administration advocates for
the sale of F-20 fighter-bombers,
mobile I-Hawk anti-aircraft
missiles and (the much talked
about) Stinger shoulder-fire
missiles to the Jordanians, have
to their convenience, argued that
these weapons are necessary to
both meet Jordan's security
threats and also to help bring
about developments in the
"peace process." Both of these
claims should be looked at more
carefully.
In terms of Jordan's security
needs, the sale of advanced air
defense systems will do little to

burden by forcing Israel to im-
plement costly countermeasures.
" Increase Jordan's war-
making ability and therefore the
likelihood of its participation in
another war.
Lastly; the Stinger missiles
would be the ultimate prize for
Palestinian terrorists residing in
Jordan, as they are easily tran-
sportable and highly accurate.
Considering the fact that the bor-
der with Jordan is both their
longest and the most difficult to
defend, if these Stingers were to
fall into the hands of terrorists,
the Israelis would not be able to
insure the safety of military and
especially civilian aircreaft
flying in Israeli air space.
It is also interesting to consider
the "peace process" aspect
behind the reasoning for the sale.
The U.S. is desperately grasping
for short-sighted accomplish-
ments in the negotiations in-
volving the Jordanians.
Wanting to be as much of a
partner in the process as we were
in Camp David, Administration
officials have been blinded to the
fact that the recent marriage of
convenience between Arafat and
BLOOM COUNTY

Hussein i
their com
to their df
peace wit
Jordan wi
shoule be
represent
Palestinia
this has b
the creati(
and Syriai
a major
negotiatio
Addition
U.S. waite
tered i
negotiatio
supplying
If these
Jordan t
makes pea
remove a
Hussein
negotiati
nedy-He
has 73 sig
highlights
that must1
no arm
negotiatior
Finally,
Murphy ar
are gear

;:

I

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