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September 16, 1985 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-09-16

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Page 10 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 16, 1985
Harbaugh's hack; hard luck for Irish

By BRAD MORGAN
It was halftime of Saturday's
Michigan-Notre Dame game. The
Irish held a 9-3 lead, and the fans were
getting restless.
While the Wolverine defense was
playing tough, the offense was
showing signs of the same
sluggishness that plagued it all last
season. Michigan had managed ten
first downs, all rushing, and a
sustained drive was as easy to find in
the stat book as a four-leaf clover on
the Michigan Stadium carpet.
EVEN MORE worrisome, though,
was the play of quarterback Jim Har-
baugh. All eyes were on the senior
signal caller in his first game since a
broken arm ended his 1984 season.
Only the Irish eyes were smiling. Just
two of ten for 16 yards passing, Har-
baugh had failed to get the offense
going. In fact, on Michigan's lone first
half scoring drive, only two of the
eleven plays were passes, and only
one was completed, good for seven
yards.

Then came the second half.
Michigan got a gift touchdown after
Alonzo Jefferson fumbled the opening
kickoff. Following a Notre Dame field
goal, the Wolverines took over on
their own 20 trailing 12-10. Out came
Harbaugh and the offense, and out
flew all doubts about Harbaugh's
ability to lead the team.
Passes on first and second down
started the drive, and from then on,
Harbaugh's confidence seemed to
grow with every play. Michigan
methodically marched the 80 yards
dowpfield for a touchdown as Har-
baugh took charge, mixing the run
and pass beautifully. In that span of
7:02, a quarterback was born.
"HE STARTED to become con-
fident he was going to win this game"
said head coach Bo Schembechler. "I
wasn't concerned with his stats, he's a
heady kid and he'll get better."
By going five for seven in the second

Poised 'M' quarterback
leads second half attack

but I don't know what part I played in
it.

"NO ONE guy moves a team 80
yards," he continued. "I'm just glad
we had a good offensive effort."
While Harbaugh downplayed his
own role in the victory, the Palo Alto,
CA native couldn't hide his happiness
at scoring his first touchdown at
Michigan, a ten-yard scamper on a
quarterback draw.

half, Harbaugh finished the day seven
for 17 for 74 yards. Also, Harbaugh
showed good scrambling ability,
rushing for 60 yards and keeping the
Irish off balance.
s"He did agreat job," said Notre
Dame coach Gerry Faust. "He sure
hurt us on a few of those scrambles."
SCHEMBECHLER KNEW the
value of Harbaugh's running ability.
"I hope teams worry about it," he
said. "If they do, it will give Jim more
time to pass (because of the added
threat)."
Harbaugh also earned the praise of

the defensive unit for conducting the
long drives that gave the defense time
to rest.
"He's a smart guy, just the type of
man who can lead a team," said
defensive tackle Mike Hammerstein.
"HE'S ALWAYS thinking and he
knows how to get the job done."
With such praise coming from all
directions, Harbaugh demonstrated
the verbal scrambling ability that is
the mark of a true veteran.
"We were happy we could move the
ball," he said. "Our offensive line
hasn't gotten the credit it deserves. I
think our whole offense has improved,

A

"It feels great," he said with a
smile. "We caught them in a man-to-
man defense, and (quarterback coach
Jerry) Hanlon called the play from
the press box.

"Anyone could have scored on that
play, but I'm just thankful he called
it."
As for Wolverine fans, they're
thankful Michigan has found a quar-
terback. '

Harbaugh
... "a heady kid"

'M'shames lame Notre Dame

The University of Michigan
has a national reputation
for excellence.
THE COLUMBIA SCHOLASTIC
PRESS ASSOCIATION
awards this
FIRST PLACE CERTIFICATE
to
Cao iMu llt ndLi taton 'r Nes ritin
Given at Columbia University in the City of New York,
in its Gold Circle Awards for 1985.
Fo r therue ce s rinled
cSo do we.
First place award for college news wri tin g 1985

(Continued from Page 1)
about." The 267-pound lineman,
known as "Hammer" by his team-
mates, had 13 tackles.
Linebackers Andy Moeller and
Mike Mallory had 15 and 10 tackles
respectively.
THE GAME remained close the en-
tire first half with Notre Dame
leading 9-3, but the key play came
when Michigan kicked off to start the
second half. Alonzo Jefferson fumbled
the catch and Dieter Heren streaked
to the ball and recovered it on the
Notre Dame 10.
Two plays later, Jim Harbaugh
executed a perfect quarterback draw
and ran 10 yards untouched to put
Michigan ahead for the first time, 10-
9.

philosophical "It (the fumble) was
one time the Lord looked down on
somebody other than Notre Dame."
The Michigan offense had problems
in the first half. It was able to move
the ball, but could only muster a 21-
yard field goal off the foot of freshman
Mike Gillette, who beat out three
others for the starting job.
But in the second half, everything
came together. Under Harbaugh's
leadership, the Wolverines had two
long drives - one for a touchdown and
another -for a field goal - that ate up
over 14 minutes.
"I KNEW we were going to drive
the ball," Harbaugh said. "It was just
a matter of getting a few breaks.
Those were typical Michigan drives."

Wolverines led 17-12.
Insurance came in the fourth quar-
ter on a 23-yard Gillette field goal to
end the scoring.
TAILBACK JAMIE Morris was theE
workhorse for Michigan's offense,
piling up 119 yards on 23 carries. He
also caught three passes for 24
markers. "He's a scrappy little guy
and I think he's a lot like Pinkett,"
Schembechler commented. "The
good thing is he's durable."
Opening holes for Morris was an of-
fensive line that gelled even with
some recent changes. Center Bob
Tabachino, who was moved from the
guard spot a week into practice, said
that he was comfortable at his new
-position. . "It's a little different
having someone on your nose," he ad-
ded.
The line also protected Harbaugh,
not allowing a sack. "We worked real
hard at that," Tabachino noted. "We
didn't want Jim to get sacked. The
key is, we got to keep getting better.
We can't be satisfied with that."
Morris, though, had no complaints,
"The offensive line did a great job,"'
said the sophomore. "Last year we
got used to cracks, this year we got
used to holes."
And Harbaugh, who finished the
day with 60 yards on the ground and 74
in the air was wholly pleased.
"This was everything we could have
wanted in an opening game - TV, the
great tradition of Notre Dame, and
their being nationally ranked. All
those made this game great."
Big Ten Standings
Conference Overall
WL W L

Daily Photo by DAN HABIB
A joyous Bo Schembechler and his son Shemy leave the field after Bo's
Wolverines upset Notre Dame Saturday.

"We had the fumble and they went
and scored seven," said Beuerlein.
"That changed the philosophy a bit.
Some guys might have had a change
in attitude - they got frustrated, like,
'Here we go again."'
SCHEMBECHLER, now 3-3 against
South Bend rivals, also waxed

The touchdown came late in the
third quarter when Michigan drove
from its own 20 on a series of short
gains. The big play was an interferen-
ce call in the endzone on a pass to tight
end Eric Kattus, which moved the ball
to the Notre Dame 13. Bob Perryman
ran in the score from the one and the

MICHIGAN .........
Ohio State.........
Michigan State .....
Iowa .............
Indiana .............
Minnesota........
Wisconsin........
Northwestern.....
Illinois .............
Purdue .............

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0

SEPTEMBER 16th to SEPTEMBER 20th
STATE STREET GIVEAWAY

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SW1
B'
IMAG
COMI
ISLA
INTO
STEPS TO TAKE:
1. Pick up a "giveaway bag" (stuffed with mini gifts
from any participating State Street Area store or
restaurant.
2. Then ask any participating State Street Area mer-
chant for a registration form to enter the drawing.
3. Stop by the Michigan Theatre Saturday, September
21 st at 3 p.m. for the final drawing.
REGISTER NOW AT
ONE OF THESE LOCATIONS:

in a trip
to the
ahamas.l
INE YOURSELF AND YOUR CHOICE
PANION UNDER THE GRAND BAHAMA
ND SUN ... TURNING SPRING BREAK
A TROPICAL ADVENTURE.
GAME RULES:
1. Student I.D. is required to register.
2. Registration may be in person or by mail to the
State Street Area Association, P.O. Box 4128, Ann
Arbor, MI 48106.
3. No purchase or other consideration is required to
enter.
4. Only one entry per person is permitted.
5. Prize drawing will be held at the Michigan Theatre
on September21, 1985.
6. Entrants need not be present to win.

l100144... You'll drive the revolutionary Dodge
Daytona Turbo through a competition rally course set up right
here on campus. Your lap will be electronically timed and the
student with the best* official score wins a trip to Daytona
Beach to compete in the National Grand Finals. Other prizes
will be awarded to 2nd and 3rd place finishers and each hour
spectators and drivers alike will win great campus prizes.
Absolutely no purchase is necessary... it's all free fun.

14P... Over $125.000 in prizes will be awarded in the
3rd Annual National Collegiate Driving Championships brought
to you by Dodge and other participating sponsors.
National Grand Finals Awards
1st Place -- $5.000 cash scholarship and use of a Dodge
Daytona Turbo for 1 year
2nd Place -- $3000 cash scholarship and use of a Dodge
Daytona Turbo for 1 year
3rd Place - $2000 cash scholarship and use of a Dodge

mo xmN

60

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