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September 13, 1985 - Image 17

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-09-13
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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Page 10 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 13, 1985

w U U V U U

The Michigan Daily - Friday, Se
Jokisch will be a man in m

DINING AND DRINKING

By BRAD MORGAN
With the passing of this year's
senior class, the last group of fans
who saw Anthony Carter play in
Michigan Stadium will finally be
gone, a fact that has to bring a sigh of
relief from the Michigan receiving
corps.
Ever since the Carter Ad-
ministration (Anthony, that is), anyi
new receiver entering the program
seemed to be billed as "the new An-
thony Carter." The scenario that
usually followed was that talented
receivers such as Triando Markray
and Gilvani Johnson would play well,
but of course could never fill the shoes
of the man called "a once in a lifetime
player" by receiver coach Bob Thor-
nbladh.
THE RESULTING pressure and
fan response served to hide the fact
that Michigan's receivers were
almost always above average, a fact
that holds true again this season.
The key man to watch this year is
split end Paul Jokisch. The senior
out of Birmingham wavered between
basketball and football during his
previous years, but now that he's
decided on the gridiron, the ex-
citement created by his 6-8 frame
is considerable.
Down ten pounds to 230, Jokisch will
have an 8-10 inch height advantage on
nearly every defender, a fact that will
make him "a factor on the bomb by
pure virtue of his size," according to
Thornbladh.
TO GO ALONG with that size,
though, is deceptive speed. Jokisch

runs the 40-yard dash in a quick 4.5
seconds.
"It's like watching a jet in the sky
and thinking it's barely moving," said
Thornbladh. "He's got that longer
stride that makes it look like he's not
running hard at all, and then he's by
you."
Jokisch himself knows the value of
speed.
"I LIKE A lot of room to operate,"
he said. "I like to get man-to-man
because people don't anticipate me
having that kind of speed."
Head coach Bo Schembechler
summed Jokisch's talents up best.
"He's a dangerous guy. It's simply
difficult to defend a 6-8 receiver who
can run fast," commented Schem-
bechler.

SEI
in the
Camp
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defens
repla
In
bump
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char
coach
sprin
giver
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stren
As
passi
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a sm
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di
Campbell
... a new position CAF

Daily Photo by CAROL L. FRANCAVILLA
Paul Jokisch should have many more occasions this season to display this
kind of excitement as the speedy, 6-8 receiver will see plenty of action as
the starting split end.

PERRYMAN, WHITE LEND DEPTH TO FULLBACK POSITION:
Morris will ignite 'M' backfield a

By BRAD MORGAN
It's still too early to tell if the 1985
Michigan backfield will rival the
great Wolverine backfields of old or if
it will produce a patented Michigan
1,000 yard back, but the speed and.
size necessary to build such a unit and
produce such an individual is cer-
tainly there.

Speed will be provided by now-you-
see-him-now-you-don't tailback
Jamie Morris. Morris made Michigan
history last year by becoming the fir-
st freshman to lead the Wolverines in
rushing since 1945, and the 5-7 178-
pounder out of Ayre, Mass., should
produce even better numbers with a
year of experience under his belt. His

size is occasionally a detriment, but
the speedster still managed to elude
tacklers to the tune of 573 yards
rushing last year.
"MORRIS AMAZES you with his
ability to play a big man's game,"
said head coach Bo Schembechler.
"Every spring practice except for the
Spring Game, he broke one or two

Backfield
depth chart
QUARTERBACK
Jim Harbaugh (Sr)
Chris Zurbrugg (Jr)
FULLBACK
BOB PERRYMAN (Sr)
Gerald White (Jr)
TAILBACK
JAMIE MORRIS (So)
Thomas Wilcher (Sr)
CAPS indicate returning starters

long ones."
Although only a sophomore, Morris
knows the pressure is on for him to
perform and provide leadership after
last year's numbers.
"I look at myself as a quiet, quiet
leader," he said. "Sophomores are sup-
posed to be quiet, so I'm just going to
let my actions on the field speak out as
much as I can."
BACKING MORRIS up is still more
speed. Thomas Wilcher (6-0, 185) is a
sprinter for the Michigan track team
in the off season, and after finally
overcoming injury problems that
have plagued his football career, he
should see plenty of playing time.
Size will be provided at the fullback
position in the form of veterans Bob
Perryman (6-2, 225) and Gerald White
(6-1, 210). Perryman, a senior, rushed
for 388 yards a year ago and led the
team with a 5.1 yards per carry
average.
White ran for 358 yards last season,
and while he is listed behind
Perryman on the depth chart, the two
will alternate quite often and both will
see a good deal of playing time.

AL
perin
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Po
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play
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yet t

White
... the challenger

Perryman
... the starter

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