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September 13, 1985 - Image 15

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-09-13
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Page 12 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 13, 1985

The Michigan Daily - Friday,
The riht stuff: Size and attitudem
-aleader by example o

September 14: Notre Dame

COACH: Gerry Faust, Notre Dame (1981-84)
25-20-1
LAST YEAR'S RECORD: 7-5
LAST MEETING VS MICHIGAN: Notre
Dame 23, Michigan 17 (1982)
SERIES LEADER: Michigan, 11-5
OFFENSIVE STARTERS RETURNING: 6
DEFENSIVE STARTERS RETURNING: 8
PLAYERS TO WATCH: Tim Scannell (00),
Steve Beuerlein (QB), Allen Pinkett (TB),
Tom Doerger (OT), Mike Griffin (NG), Wally
Kleine (DT), Tony Furjanic (MLB), Mike
Larkin (LB), Hiawatha Francisco (DB).

You heard it here: the winner of
this titanic opening clash between
Michigan and Notre Dame will go
on to have a banner year. With
both teams having so much to
prove after mediocre '84 seasons,
this is bound to be one of the most
hard-hitting games of the year.
The Fighting Irish have been
preparing for this one all summer
with rumors going around that
they have shaved a "Wolverine
stripe" on their forearms. Star
tailback Allen Pinkett was quoted
in the Sporting News' College
Preview as saying, "When we get

lazy, that strip reaffirms our
committment to a national title."
THE NOTRE Dame offense is
anchored by the record-setting
Pinkett, who now holds 12 season
and career school records. He
needs only 441 yards to pass Vagas
Ferguson's record of 3,472 career
yards set in 1979.
Steve Beuerlein will again be the
signal caller after producing the
highest individual pass completion
percentage in school history hit-
ting 60.3 percent of his aerials. He
will have several talented
receivers to throw to including
senior Milt Jackson and sophomore
Reggie Ward. Three offensive line
starters return in Tim Scannell,

John Askin, and Mike Perrino.
With eight starters returning on
defense, the Irish may not give up
the 212 points they yielded last
year. Mike Griffin and Wally
Kleine will anchor the front line
and will be aided by defensive cap-
tains Tony Furjanic and Mike
Larkin at the linebacker spots. The
only new face in the secondary is
Joe Johnson, who also has con-
siderable experience.
As sure as anything, all eyes will
be on head coach Gerry Faust, who
is entering the final year of his con-
tract. A win over Michigan would
undoubtedly take some pressure
off the embattled coach.
-PHIL NUSSEL

By PHIL NUSSEL
Youth, inexperience, mistakes,
immaturity - these are all factors
that contribute to a losing football
team. These are all the terms used
when a team is in a rebuilding year.
To some extent, the Michigan'
defense is undergoing a rebuilding
year, but not completely. While there
will be some new faces on the squad,
major problems with inexperience
could be avoidable because of a few,
very talented players that return
with much-needed experience and

Pinkett
... leading rusher

September 21: at South Carolina

COACH: Joe Morrison, South Carolina (1983-
84) 15-8
LAST YEAR'S RECORD: 10-2
LAST MEETING VS MICHIGAN: South
Carolina 17, Michigan 14
SERIES LEADER: South Carolina, 1-4
OFFENSIVESTARTERS RETURNING: 5
DEFENSIVE STARTERS RETURNING: 6
PLAYERS TO WATCH: Mike Hold (QB),
Thomas Dendy (RB), Eric Poole (SE), Tony
Guyton (DE), Joe Brooks (SS), Chris Major
(CB).

Despite the loss of the entire
starting offensive line and three
out of four defensive linemen,
South Carolina coach Joe Morrison
is optimistic about his Gamecocks,
which finished the 1984 campaign
with a 10-2 mark and a Gator Bowl
bid.
"We had a good season and feel
that one of the strong suits we will
have this year is the tremendous
carry over from last year,"
Morrison said. "But, we can never
forget how we got where we did -
with a lot of hard work and effort."

THE ENTIRE fate of the offense
will lie with the all-new line. If they
do well, the Gamecocks could be
the best team in the country
because the backfield is loaded
with depth and talent. Two quar-
terbacks - Mike Hold and Allen
Mitchell - are experienced and
capable of leading the team.
Starting running backs Thomas
Dendy and Kent Hagood combined
for over 1200 yards last season, but
will be pushed by juniors Raynard
Brown and Anthony Smith. Brown,
who averaged five yards a crack
last year, is the fastest runner on
the team and is the strongest for
his size (5-9, 185).
South Carolina's defensive
rebuilding job is similar to
Michigan's with a front line

needing lots of new blood. Ends
Willie McIntee and Tony Guyton
will be sorely needed to produce.
The secondary is very strong with
returning linebackers Carl Hill and
Chris Morris.
Strong safety Joe Brooks is
perhaps the most talented player
on the defense. The junior out of
Warner Robbins, Ga. had 84
tackles and three interceptions in
'84 to earn him All-South Indepen-
dent honors.
The Gamecock kicking game is
solid with placekicker Scott Hagler
and punter Tom O'Connor retur-
ning. Hagler was 45-45 in point af-
ters while O'Connor averaged 40 4
yards a punt.
-PHIL NUSSEL

he has been named the Defensive
Champion or Defensive Hustler by
the coaching staff.
After being a third team All-
America and a second team All-Big
Ten selection in '84, the Royal Oak,
Mi. native is a consensus preseason
All-America candidate.
"IT'S A PERSONAL goal, it's an
incentive," Cochran said. It's a nice
thing to have, but you just got to play
well to get it and even then it's up to
how they vote."
At 6-3, 220 along with 4.4 speed,
Cochran has the type of physical
credentials that coaches rave about.
Assistant head coach Gary Moeller
certainly did when he said, "His
physical abilites are the key thing.
He can run well, he's over 200 pounds,
he's 6-2, and he can just make plays.
"Physical ability is one thing, and
he's also had the playing experien-
ce."
LIKE MOST seniors, Cochran will
be needed for leadership ability and
he is also expected to improve. "We
expect Brad, obviously, to be a very
positive influence," Moeller ad-
ded."The key to his success is how
well he improves."
Cochran is quick to say that he is
still strictly concerned with college
football. The lure of pro money, con-
tracts, and agents has not affected
him. Unlike other Big Ten football
stars like Keith Byars and Pepper
Johnson of Ohio State, the Wolverine
cornerback does not have an insuran-
ce policy that would pay him for
receiving a career-ending injury.
"I thought about it," he noted, "but
I don't have one. I'm playing to win
the Big Ten. I try to stay away from
that sort of stuff."
WHEN ASKED if a lot of players
look too far ahead to pro ball, Cochran
said, "Sure, it's hard when you have
all that money flashed in your face. I
think that going out and playing your

IL/

Brooks
... leads secondary

Cochran
... one of the best
leadership.
ONE OF THESE players is senior
Brad Cochran, who is among the most
talented defensive backs in college
football today.
For over two years, Cochran has
been a highly-reliable product in the
Michigan secondary. He has started
every game for the last two seasons
and has led the team with five inter-
ceptions each campaign. Five times

Cornerback Brad Cochran shows Illinois receiver David Williams why he was
last year. Cochran is a concensus pre-season All-American this season.

butt off and having a great year for
your team and for your school will
help you more in the long run than go-
ing out and dancing around for a pro
scout."
It seems pretty obvious that the
only thing Cochran wants to do is help
Michigan win - that's it.
"I'm just ready for the season," he
remarked. "More so than ever, I'm
looking forward to it. I want to do well
and leave on a winning note. I like
Michigan and I want the program to
stay up there.
"AND I want to go to the Rose
Bowl."
Defensive backfield coach Lloyd
Carr has worked with Cochran exten-
sively over the last few years and
talked about his cornerback's at-

titudes saying, "I think it (Cochran's)
attitude) is indicative of a very
mature guy. Anyone with maturity
realizes that if you want to be a high
draft choice, you have to have a great
senior year."
In order for Michigan to return to
the Rose Bowl, the defense will have
to improve. And, with an untested
front line, Cochran and his team-
mates in the secondary could be
pressured to hold in some of the ex-
ploding offenses that highlight many
of the '85 Big Ten teams.
"THERE'S A lot of pressure on the
secondary," Cochran observed, "and
when you don't have a really good
pass rush, it's kind of hard to play
man to man and that's why we've
gone to the zone."

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September 28: Maryland

COACH: Bobby Ross, Maryland (25-11) 1982-
84
LAST YEAR'S RECORD: 8-3; first in ACC
LAST MEETING VS MICHIGAN: This is the
first meeting between the two teams.
OFFENSIVE STARTERS RETURNING: 8
DEFENSIVE STARTERS RETURNING: 9
PLAYERS TO WATCH: Rick Badanjek
(FB), Tony Edwards (OT), Stan Gebaugh
(QB), Bruce Mesner (MG), Al Covington (SS),
Chuck Faucette (LB).
Michigan's 1985 schedule is
perhaps the toughest docket it has
ever had.
The toughest team on that
schedule could very well be the
Maryland Terrapins, a team
ranked third in the Gameplan an-
nual college football poll.

AND IT'S NO wonder the defen-
ding ACC champs are so highly
touted - they return 17 starters
from a team that won its last seven
games including an incredible
comeback win over Miami (Fla) in
which the Terrapins trailed 31-0 at
half. Maryland also beat Ten-
nessee in the Sun Bowl, 28-27.
On offense, eight starters are
back led by fullback Rick Badan-
jek who had 832 yards and 15
touchdowns. Alvin Blount and
Tommy Neal also return in the
backfield. They combined for
almost 1400 yards and had 11
touchdowns last year. The only

loss on the line was at center, but
that's not expected to be a
problem.
Stan Gelbaugh, who started five
games last season, looks to be the
top quarterback. He passed for
1,123 yards and five touchdowns
giving up only four interceptions.
Middle guard Bruce Mesner and
safety Al Covington are certain to
be the leaders of the tough
Terrapin defense. The two were
All-ACC picks last season. Another
top player is Chuck Faucette, the
team's second leading tackler with
120 in '84. Six others return on
defense.
Maryland has a difficult early
season schedule facing Penn State,
Boston College, and West Virginia
all before travelling to Ann Arbor
to meet the Wolverines.
-PHIL NUSSEL

Line is big on

bulk, low on expej

By PHIL NUSSELa
When Bo Schembechler opened
spring practice, one of the top
priorities on defense was rebuilding
the defensive line, which lost two top-I
notch performers in middle guard Al1
Sincich and tackle Kevin Brooks.1
This was no easy task since thesel
two stalwarts started for a combined
18 games and together piled up 132
tackles.
ALTHOUGH the new line has not]

been tested, it could turn out to be a
successfully-rebuilt position.
The main reason for this is the
return of fifth-year senior Mike
Hammerstein, who has now bulked up
to 267. The lineman registered 54
tackles last season and is being
looked at for leadership in the tren-
ches this year.
"We expect good play out of him."
said defensive coordinator Gary
Moeller. "His experience and leader-

ship will help us up front."
ANOTHER REASON for the op-
timism is the return of a much
heavier Mike Reinhold at middle
guard.The senior, who was converted
to being a lineman after a critical leg
injury in 1983 when he played
linebacker, has yet to play the
position in a game, but with his
weight up to 255 after a good spring,
the Muskegon, MI. native could have
a good season.

COLLEGIATE CLEANERS'
wishes theWolverines
SUCCESS IN THE
1985 FOOTBALL SEASON
Have your laundry
" picked up
w professionally cleaned
" folded
" delivered the next day
For more information, call
996-0894
Services available to all university and off-campus housing

Defensive line depth chart

Adding to the depth at middle guard
is Billy Harris, who, like Reinhold,
also put on weight over the summer
and now checks in at 250. Harris saw
limited action last season and will
certainly get more time this year.
The other tackle position is up for
grabs between sophomores Mark
Messner (6-3, 245) and Dave Chester
(6-2, 248). "Those two guys are going
to have to come forward this season,"
said line coach Jerry Meter. "They
could be the difference on the defen-
sive line this season." Neither player
saw action last season, but both looked
good in the spring.
MESSNER, WHO Schembenhler
called the "most impressive" fresh-
man on defense a year ago, will
probably get the nod to start. '
Both Moeller and Meter agreed that
the line will improve from game to
game. It will most likely suffer from a
lack of experience.
"We think we can be pretty good,"
Moeller said. "It's a time-teller type
thing. We think, and hopefully it's
gningta &be characteristic of our whole

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LEFT TACKLE
MIKE HAMMERSTEIN (Sr)
Dave Folkertsma (Jr)

MIDDLE GUARD
Mike Reinhold (Sr)
Billy Harris (Jr)

RIGHT TACKLE
Mark Messner (So)
David Chester (So)
CAPS indicates returning starter.

Hammerstein
... the veteran

wisps s IIY II YYI Iw I IY

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