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September 11, 1985 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-09-11

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 11, 1985 - Page 3

Students suffer with
back-to-school stress;

I

By SUSANNE SKUBIK
You waited in line at CRISP for an hour, then the com-
puter broke down. You can't get any of the classes you
need for your major, and you haven't slept in days. And to
top it all off, you find out that your newest roommates are
cockroaches.
Ah, those welcome-back blues - September stress.
Though most everybody gets them, some students seem to
deal with campus chaos better than others.
"DON'T EXPECT to be a super-person," said Doreen
Murasky, senior counselor at University Counseling Ser-
vices. "Plan your time realistically and plug away at
things slowly."
"Don't leave a lot of things hanging over your head.
Complete them one at a time and feel good about it,"
Murasky said. When you're caught in red tape, and
there's no one to blame, Murasky suggests a long walk or
a bike ride.
Of the many stressful situations facing students,
registering for classes is clearly one of the worst. But ac-

cording to Rhodes Murphy, an LSA academic advisor,
much of the stress of dropping and adding can be avoided.
"MOST THINGS can wait. There aren't any penalities
at Drop/Add until the third week," Murphy said. "Relax
and shop around. Register for four classes, but attend five
or six. Then if you need an override, you can choosf
wisely."
Besides CRISP, roommate problems are also likely to
surface during the first few weeks of class Murashy
suggests that roommates open the lines of communication
to talk about their differences.
"Sit down with your roommate and make all your ex-
pectations clear," she said. "Say, 'it really bugs me when
you play your stereo when I'm studying' and 'I really get
mad when you don't do the dishes."'
Adding to students' stress are poor eating and sleeping
habits, Murasky said. Neglect your body, and "sooner or
later you'll feel fatigued and irritable."
Drinking can also bring more pressure, because "when
a student goes to a party, he or she is worrying about fit-
ting in and measuring up," she said.

*AUDITIONS*
OPEN CALL!!
RESIDENCE HALL REPERATORY THEATRE
-----BE PART OF A NEW CONCEPT IN THEATRE----
---EXITRESS YOUR CONCERN WITH SOCIAL ISSUES---

Associated Press
Looney Tunes
In honor of the 50th anniversary of Warner Bros.' Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons, the Museum of
Modern Aft in New York is running a special exhibit titled, "That's NOT ALL, Folks!" Standing by their
creations are animators Chuck Jones, left, and Fritz Freleng, right.

Reagan has chance
F ederal Reserve Boa

WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Reagan is being presented with a
chance to shape economic policy for
the next decade with two appointmen-
ts to the Federal Reserve Board.
But the president also faces a
dilemma - should he go with a sup-
ply-sider interested in economic
growth or someone more concerned
about the battle against inflation.
SINCE the term for a Federal
Reserve Board governor is 14 years,
Reagan's choices will be influencing
economic policy long after he leaves
dffice.
In making the decision, the
president will not be faced with a

shortage of candidates willing to ac-
cept a prestigious appointment to the
central bank's seven-member board.
Reagan will actually have two ap-
pointments to make to the Fed in
coming months. One vacancy exists
already with the resignation last mon-
th of Lyle Gramley to accept a job as
chief economist of the Mortgage
Bankers Association.
THE OTHER ONE will occur in
January when the term of J. Charles
Partee expires.
With those two appointments,
Reagan will have nominated a
majority of the board. His two earlier
choices came from the supply-side

o shape
rd policy
camp. Vice Chairman Preston Martin
and Martha Seeger, both of whom
have often dissented from the anti-in-
flation policies pushed by Federal
Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker.
Supply-siders believe in sharp cuts
in tax rates and an easy monetary
policy to stimulate the economy.
MONETARISTS, on the other hand,
advocate steady money growth as a
way of guarding against inflation.
The Reagan administration has of-
ten been pulled in opposite directions
by these two economic philosophies.
In his first term, the president
pushed for the deep tax cuts that sup-
ply-siders favored.

AUDITIONS WILL BE HELD ON SEPTEMBER 10 and 12, 7-9 p.m. IN THE WEST LOUNGE--SOUTH QUADRANGLE
The Residence Hall Reperatory Theatre will be available to the campus as a
resource for educating students in a creative and innovative fashion. The
company will be developing a series of dynamic presentations or "eprncs
dealing with issuessuch as sex roles, racism,idrug abuse, and stress. Poetry,
original material, music, scripted work, and dance will all be combined to
create programs to be performed in the Residence Halls and elsewhere on campus.
If you have additional questions please call Scott Weissman, Artistic Director,
764-1126 or 764-1137.
Scott Weissman, M.F.A., is a graduate of The University of Michigan's Professional Theatre
Training Program. He has performed, taught, and directed in the Ann Arbor area over
the past three years.

--------------HAVE AN

I M PA C T!" mm--------------

MSA asks Josephson to nominate VP

(Continued from Page 1)
Josephson said.
HE SAID the assembly plans to con-
tinue a review of the constitution and
hire a historian to compile MSA's
history "so we can have a precedent

to fall back on, which we don't now."
MSA representatives expressed
disappointment at Feusse's depar-.
ture, but seemed convinced that she
made the right decision.
"I'm sorry she resigned, but if she

,HAPPENINGS
Highlight
The Galliard Brass Ensemble will perform Pachelbel's Canon in D live
on the diag at noon as part of a campus "dedication to the service of
humanity" sponsored by several University spiritual centers.
Films
MTF - Call Northside 777, 7 p.m.; Anatomy of a Murder, 9 p.m.,
Michigan Theater.
Speakers
Russian and Eastern European Studies - Brown Bag Lecture, William
Rosenberg and Joseph Placek, "Resources at the University of
Michigan," noon, Lane Hall Commons Room.
Meetings
Marketing Club -4p.m., Hale Auditorium.
Commission for Women - noon, 2002 LSA.
Dissertation Support Group -1:30 p.m., 3100 Michigan Union.
Science Fiction Club - Stilyagi Air Corps, 8:15 p.m., Michigan League.
Miscellaneous
Career Planning and Placement - Business Intern Program meeting,
6 p.m., Rackham Auditorium.
Chemistry - Seminar, Walter Opdycke, "The Development of
Catheter-Type Potentiometric Sensors for Ammonia & Carbon Dioxide
'Detection," 4 p.m., 1200 Chemistry Building.
Industrial and Operations Enginerring - Seminar, Stephen Pollack,
"Approximate Ion Analysis for Open Tandem Queues with Blocking: Ex-
ponential & General Service Distributions," 4 p.m., 241 IOE.
Biological Sciences - Seminar, "Photosynthetic Oxygen Evolution," 4
p.m., MLB 2.
Department of Statistics - Seminar, "A Limit Theorem for Random
Walks in Random Environment," Professor Steven Lalley, 4:00 p.m., 451
Mason Hall.

thought she didn't have enough time
then I have no problem with it,"
Krawczyk said, "if the vice president
can't put in enough time it would
greatly hurt the assembly.
FEUSSE SAID she resigned
because she didn't have enough time
to be both vice president and a
resident fellow in East Quad.
Mary Ann Nemer, an MSA
representative from LSA, wanted to
know "who stipulated that Micky had
to put in 40 hours every week?"
"Forty hours is a lot of time for a
student who isn't even amn RF. There's
no doubt she should have been an ef-
fective vice president without 40 hours
a week," Nemer said.
Engineering college representative
Mike Sovel agreed that "40 hours is
too much of anything when you have
to go to school. There should be plenty
of people to spread the work around so
Micky doesn't have to work that
much."
CORE COMMITTEE member
Kris Van De Kerkhove, however
thought Feusse "didn't plan well for
the position."
"She wasn't too familiar with the
assembly before she ran,". Van
DeKerkhove said. "The bare
minimum just isn't enough for a vice
president.
"Just because Micky resigned
doesn't mean we should be rendered
impotent all year," Josephson said.
He added that Thursday's
scheduled meeting of student gover-
nment representatives to discuss a
budget research committee had been
delayed because of Feusse's depar-
ture.
But the assembly does not expect
delays in any other projects as the
search for Feusse's replacement con-
tinues, Josephson said.
In other action last night, MSA
unanimously reappointed Ingrid Kock
to the position of military researcher.

The Financial Expert!
These days, every expenditure should be considered
an investment. And you don't have to be a big
investor to own one of the world's finest financiIal
calculators - the HP-12C. Try one today it the
university cellar.
The HP-12C. An investment for today, and tomorrow.
]#HEWLETT
PACKARD
*Plus the University Cellar's
one year warranty!

Main Campus-
341 E. Liberty, at Division
769-7940

North Campus:
In the Commons Bldg.
994-9012

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