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April 24, 1985 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-24

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, April 24, 1985 - Page 3

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-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
The Center for the Continuing Education of Women will present the 15th
annual CEW scholarships for University women at 8 p.m. at Rackham.
Films
MTF-Liquid Sky, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Performances
Ark-Bim, 8 p.m., 637 S. Main St.
School of Music-Recitals: trombone, Drew Convery, 6p.m.; piano, Robin
MacMillan, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Major Events-Hank Williams Jr., 8 p.m., Crisler Arena.
Speakers
Afroamerican & African Studies-Robert O'Meally, "Black Tales, White
Collector: The Masks of ECL Adams," 7:30 p.m., E. Conference Room,
Rackham.
Anatomy and Cell Biology-A Kent Christensen, "The Search for
Testicular GnRH, with an Albumin Sidetrip," noon, Rm. 5732 Med. Sci. II.
Developmental Biology Training Grant-Thomas Kaufmann, "The Com-
plexities of Antennapedia-a Homeotic Gene in Drosophila Melanogaster," 4
p.m., Lec. Rm. 2, MLB.
Chemistry-Wladyslaw Koziol, "Conductive Based Detectors," 4 p.m.,
Rm. 1200; Francis Pei-Kang Liu, "Cycloaddition of Allylic Cations With 1, 3-
Dienes: Its Application in Syntheses of 7-Membered Rings," 4 p.m., Rm.
1300 Chemistry Building.
Institute of Gerontology-T. Franklir Williams, "Medical Myths &
Realities of Aging," 3:30 p.m., Rm. 3121, 400 North Ingalls Building.
Geological Science-Miriam Kastner, "Origin of Dolomite & Its Spatial &
Chronological Distribution-A New Insight," 4 p.m., Rm. 4001 C.C. Little
Building.
Human Values in Medicine-Sumer Pek & Carl Cohen, "When Is Consent
Genuinely Informed?" noon, North Lecture Hall, Med. Sci. II.
Industrial & Operations Engineering-Woodrow Barfield, "Cognitive &
Perceptual Issues in Computer Aided Design," 4 p.m., Rm. 241 IOE.
Psychiatry-Philip Resnick, "Defrocking the Fraud Detection of
Malingered Mental Illness," 10:30 a.m., Children's Psychiatric Hospital
Auditorium.
Meetings
LSA Student Government-5:45 p.m., 3rd Floor, Union.
Ann Arbor Support Group for Farm Labor-5:30 p.m., Rm. 4318, Union.
Science Fiction Club-Stilyagi Air Corps, 8:15 p.m., League.
Muslim Students Association-noon, Rm. D, League.
Dissertation Support Group-8;30 a.m., Rm. 3100 Union.
Michigan Gay Undergraduates-9 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe St.
University Council-1:15 p.m., Union.
Black Student Union-7 p.m., Trotter House.
Miscellaneous
Atmospheric & Oceanic Science-6th annual slide show, 7:30 p.m.,
Chrysler Auditorium.
Microcomputer Education Center-workshop, Intro to the Macintosh, 10
a.m., Rm. 3113 School of Education Building.
Near Eastern & North African Studies-annual award potluck, noon, Rm.
3050 Frieze Building.
MENSA-Dinner & conversation, 7 p.m., Holiday Inn, 3750 Washtenaw
Ave.
Student Wood & Craft Shop-Power tool safety class, 6 p.m., Rm. 537
Student Activities Building.

(Continued from Page 1)
intimidating us," Weinstein said, of the
police. He said police officers harassed
the protesters and beat some of them.
"THE MOST important thing for me
is that we were doing it (civil
disobedience) to liberate the peoples of
the world. .' The pain we went through
was nothing compared with what's

been going on in South Africa."
Also on Monday, protesters at
Columbia University called off their
blockade of the school's administration
building but said the fight for divest-
ment is "definitely not over."
"We thought that we've stated our
message 20,000 times over and we've
already accomplished our goal, that is

Court date set

for protesters
to get people thinking about apartheid, to Hamilton Hall as cause for
and to get people to associate the name the blockade. Goliner
of Columbia with apartheid," said Dave protesters' decision had b
Goldiner, a student leader of the 19-day before they learned of the rul
protest. Smaller protests will
Goldiner dismissed the ruling of Goldiner said, and will incl
Justice George Sherman of the New "to make sure that the comm
York State Supreme Court on Monday the administration has plann
that the protesters had to allow access go off the way they want it."

Students callfor changes in class syllabi
(Continued from Page 1)

that professorswere generally recep-
tive to the handouts.
There were exceptions, of course.
One protester said a history professor
had given the leaflet back to her with
the comment "Are you willing to
sacrifice quality for equality?"
THE GROUP said their next move is
to go to the curriculum meeting in the
fall. The meeting is a forum for debate,

and covers issues such as syllabi for more blacks and women."
new courses.PRFSO JonKotEgls
Brenda Flanagan, an English PROFESSOR John Knott, English
teaching assistant and winner of a 1985 department chairman, said he felt
Hopwood award, said she supports the there is a lot of variation in women and
rapiers'efforts. minority representation in English
class syllabi.
"I think it's a good thing they're The ralliers were "trying to sensitize
doing this," Flanagan said. "I think the people to what they see as omissions,"
English department really needs to hire he said.

Knott said he thought the groups's
decision to voice its concerns at a staff
curriculum meeting was a good idea,
but that it was "unlikely they would try
to legislate anything on the matter."
Visiting English Prof. Donna Landry,
who teaches at Princeton university,
said "Michigan is more progressive
than other institutions I've seen, but
they've got a long way to go."

r an end to
said the
een made
ing.
continue,
ude efforts
nencement
ned doesn't

Scholarship money is available for the bizarre only

(Continued from Page 1)
allowed to be married to benefit from
the award.
"Sometimes they're irate," Papish
said of the inquirers, "But I say,
'Here's the will - what can wedo?"
Papish speculated that Stone was
thinking of women who had to battle
financial and social barriers to go into
research when she set up the
fellowship.
"AT THE TIME, even more so than
now, it was financially difficult for un-
married female scholars to devote
themselves to research," Papish said.
"(Stone) must have felt that unmarried
women between 25 and 35 were the ones
who needed help."
The 1984 Mary Isabel Sibley
Fellowship went to Maura Daly, a post-
doctoral student at Notre Dame, who
says the restrictions "didn't bother me
at all, since it was perfect for me."
The fellowship has allowed Daly to
take a leave of absence from her
teaching position at Notre Dame in or-
der to write a book about a French
philosopher. She said she saw a bulletin
board announcement publicizing the
fellowship and decided to apply.
"THE LESS well-known the scholar-
ship is, the better," Daly said.
Scholarships like Daly's may not be
well publicized, but they aren't im-
possible to find if one is willing to spend
a day browsing through books con-
taining lists of private funding sources.
Such books can be found in the
Graduate Library, the Undergraduate
Library, and the Office of Career Plan-
ning and Placement.
Money is available for the average
undergraduate students, though the
scholarship provider usually stipulates

that a student have a related interest.
The National Rifle Association, for
example, doles out scholarships to
students who are interested in resear-
ching hunter safety or sports medicine.
And the International Atlantic Salmon
Foundation will give up to $3,000, but
asks that the recipient be a North
American resident "seeking to improve
their knowledge or skills in Atlantic

salmon biology, management, or
related fields."
BUT A LARGE number of the grants
listed are targeted exclusively at post
graduate and older students.
The trick here again is to seek out the
scholarships. The Simmons School of
Embalming and Mortuary Science in
Syracuse, New York, for instance,
rarely advertises its grants in high

schools because most mortuary science
students are in their late 20s, according
to Janece Lafferty, an instructor at the
school.
Rather than advertise, she said
school administrators wait for in-
terested students to inquire. Mortuary
science, she added, "is a career choice
made mostly by people more mature -
as you can imagine."

To submit items for the Happenings Column; send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

{

PREPARE FOR:

1

From the U-M Tsh Fi&e on Sexiw Onentation
A Call to the University of Michigan
Community to Join in Preventing
Discrimination on the Basis of
Sexual Orientation
On March 21, 1984, President Harold Shapiro issued the following
Presidential Pblicy Statement as the official position of
The University of Michigan:
Policy Statement on Sexual Orientation

EDUCATIONAL
CENTER
TEST PREPARATION SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938
Call Days, Eves & Weekends
662-3149
203 E. Hoover
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Permanent Centers In Mare Than 120 Major US. Cities & Aboad
For information about olter centers
OUTSIDE N.Y. STATE CALL TOLL FREE 800.223-1782
In New York State Stanley H Kaplan Educational Center Ltd.

The University of Michigan believes that
educational and employment decisions should be
based on individuals' abilities and qualifications
and should not be based on irrelevant factors or
personal characteristics which have no connection
with academic abilities or job performance.
Among the traditional factors which are generally
"irelevant" are race, sex, religion, and national
origin. It is the policy of The University of
Michigan that an individual's sexual orientation be
treated in the same manner. Such a policy ensures
that only relevant factors are considered and that
equitable and consistent standards of conduct and
penformance are applied.
Any University of Michigan employee having

a complaint of discrimination because of sexual
orientation should notify her/his immediate
supervisor or the Staff and Union Relations Office
in the appropriate personnel service center. A
student should notify the Affirmative Action
Coordinator in her/his school or college or the
Ombudsperson in the Office of the Vice President
for Student Services. At any time, a student or
employee niay call the Affirmative Action Office
or the Human Sexuality Office for counseling and
advice.
It should be noted that this policy does not
apply to the University's relationships with outside
organizations, including the federal government,
the military, and ROIC.

To insure that this policy is known, understood, and implemented
throughout the University, a U-M Task Force on Sexual Orientation
was created recently by the president with twenty members
appointed from the University community.
Students, faculty, and staff members
may communicate any information,
ideas, or proposals
on how to prevent discrimination on
the basis of sexual orientation at.
The University of Michigan, as follows:
You may communicate with the U-M Task Force on Sexual
Orientation by letter, informal note, or telephone call to Brian
Clapham, 764-3423, Affirmative Action Office, 108 Fleming Building;
or to Laura Sanders and Jim Toy, 763-4186, Human Sexuality Office,
3116-3118 Michigan Union. Your ideas may be presented anonymously.
NEED ADVERTISING EXPERIENCE

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