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April 21, 1985 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-21

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The Michigan Daily - Sunday, April 21, 1985 - Page 3

Jackson
leads
or Reagan
protest
(Continued from Page 1)
Ipess," he said.
Earlier, Columbia University
graduate student Danisa Baloyii and
Tony Glover, a Columbia senior -
leaders of Columbia's anti-apartheid
protest - spoke before the demon-
strators. "South Africa's government
has begun harassing the mother and
sisters of Jose," a South African
student at Columbia involved in the
protest, Glover told the crowd. "They
were arrested and questioned and war-
ned that Jose would be arrested," he
added.
BALOYI said that protesters at
tolumbia are still blockading the
school's administration building and
are determined to continue the
"blockade. "We've been doing it for
┬░seventeen days, we're not going to stop
until they divest," she said.
o Glover and Baloyii, were part of
several speakers and performers -- in-
"-cluding folksinger Pete Seeger - who
entertained the crowd at a pre-rally
festival at the Ellipse.
The demonstrators then began their
march, dividing up into groups which
included an Ann Arbor contingent con-
eisting of more than 150 University
r students.
THE RALLY, part of four days of
protest, called April Action, is a "get-
ting together of different factions op-
posed to Reagan's policies." said Dar-
silla Smith, a protest coordinator.
"There's no one issue," he said.
As a result, the march seemed to be a
hodgepodge of anti-Reagan groups. At
times they competed with each other
for attention.
"Say death to apartheid, blow by
blow," chanted one anti-apartheid
-roup which was only to be outshouted
a by the National Puerto Rican Solidarity
Coalition, chanting "Reagan is a
fascist, an agent of the Imperialists," in
Spanish.
Jackson, wearing a blue and yellow
Texas A & M Aggies football jersey,
Avowed to fight the Reagan ad-
ministration with a "rainbow
.:coalition."

Professors search for historical

proof of Jesus and th

(Continued from Page 1)
tempted to deter people from attending
the symposium by shouting and
carrying signs. But the protesters
seemed to have little effect on those en-
tering the room, except for several
jokes made during the conference.
Many of the speakers complained
that trying to discover the real
historical truth about Jesus is ex-
tremely difficult, for they say most of
the historical documents are
questionable.
English Prof. Randel Helms of
Arizona State University said that
many of the Gospel "miracle"stories
in the New Testament are fiction,
because writers tried to make their
writings fulfill the prophecies in the Old
Testament.
"Evidence is bounced back and forth
in the two testaments like a tennis
balls," Helms said. The New Testament
tells us more about the writer, he said,
than about Jesus.
ONE MAN in the audience reacted
strongly to Helms' speech. "God does
exist!" the unidentified man shouted at
Helms until a University security of-
ficer escorted him and a woman with
him out of the room.

University religion Prof. Joseph Hof-
fmann said, "The Gospels cover rather
than illuminate (Jesus') character."
Hoffman said that the historical
Jesus taught that the Apocalypse - a
time when God would judge all men ,-
would occur during his lifetime. He said
that the first three out of four Gospels
covered up this fact. "The evangelists
wanted people to think that the things
Jesus said were true," he said.
SOME scholars say sources other
than the Bible can be useful in "finding
the historical Jesus." The Dead Sea
Scrolls, for example,bhave been
correlated with the Bible and the
Christian movement of Jesus' time.
Noel Freedman, a University
professor of the Old Testament, presen-
ted evidence as to why he thinks the
Bible and the Dead Sea Scrolls have ab-
solutely nothing to do with each other.
He pointed to the fact that the Dead Sea
Scrolls are written in Hebrew, while the
New Testament is in Greek. The style of
writing is very different, he said. The
Dead Sea Scrolls contain few names,
the New Testament has an abundance
of them, he said.
Freedman said the Essene
movement was a priestly one, while the

Gospels
Christian movement was a layman's.
"The only law the two groups had in
common was that they both said to love
thy neighbor," he said.
Ellis Rivkin, a Jewish history
professor at the Hebrew Union College,
said that we are so desperate for infor-
mation that we must explore unlikely
sources.
Rivkin said he suggests studying the
writings of Josephus. For though he
barely mentions Jesus, he said, ". . . he
does provide us with a highly reliable
framework of time, place, structure,
and circumstance which can be used as
a filter for separating out the historical
Jesus from the resurrected Christ in the
Gospel stories."
Many of the speakers expressed a
desire for the public to be more aware
of these views so their opinions on
Christianity will be based on fact.
"I've seen newspapers treat the
resurrection as a national event. People
reading this don't know there are other
views. I think our culture is in trouble
on these matters," said Stanford's
Harvey.

Subtle Rebellion

Doily Photo by DAN HABIB

Jason Staczek, an Engineering sophomore, and Mike Nino, an LSA
sophomore, carve their initials atop "The Cube," with the Fleming ad-
ministration building looming in the background. When asked what they
were doing, they replied: "Just taking a spin."

Correction
Rick Blalock, former vice president of
the Bursley Board of Governors (BOG),
was charged by the city with embez-
zling $535. The BOG had originally
charged Blalock with embezzling
almost $2,500. The Daily incorrectly
reported the charge in yesterday's
paper.

Saving
babies is
Support the
SMarchof Dimes
BiRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION

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-HAPPENINGS
Sunday
Highlight
Extension Service is sponsoring the ninth conference of the Michigan
Association for Infant Mental Health. The topic for the conference will be :
"Infants & Families: Going into the 21st Century." Registration for the con-
ference begins at 8:30 a.m. in the Michigan League.
Films
MTF-Charlotte's Web, 4 & 7 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Alt. Act.-Born In Flames, 7 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Performances
School of Music-Recitals: clarinet, Donald LePage, noon; violin,
Thomas Cappadona, 2 p.m.; violin, Hsiu Hsiang Yang, 4 p.m., Recital Hall;
University Band/Campus Band, 4 p.m., Michigan Youth Symphony, 8 p.m.,
Hill Auditorium. Faculty Dance, 3 p.m., Dance Building.
Residential College-Concert of original Compositions, Marc Bruell, Todd
Wyse and Milton Hill, 8 p.m., Residential College Auditorium.
Performance Network-Extremities, 6:30 p.m., 408 W. Washington St.
Ars Musica-concert, 8 p.m., Bethlehem United Church of Christ.
Miscellaneous
Museum of Art-Lecture/tour, The African Collection, 1:10-2 p.m.
His House Christian Fellowship-Dinner, 6:30 p.m.; Bible study, 7 p.m.,
925 E. Ann St.
Highlight Monday
The School of Natural Resources and the Wildland Management Center
will be sponsoring a lecture by Leo Ribuffo. The lecture is entitled
"Strategic Approaches to Conservation: International Activities." It will
be at 3 p.m. in room 1040 of the Dana Building.
Films
MTF-Das Boot, 7 & 9:40 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Performances
Guild House-Readings, Cherry Conrad & Janet Kauffman, 8 p.m., 802
Monroe St.
School of Music-Composers forum, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Performance Network-Pandora's Box, 7 p.m., 408 W. Washington St.
Speakers
Near Eastern and North African Studies-Shulamit Aloni, "The Status of
Women in Israel & Citizens' Rights"8 p.m., Rackham Auditorium.
Program in American Culture-Leo Ribuffo, "The New Fundamentalist
Right in Historical Perspective," 7:30 p.m., East Lecture Room, Rackham.
Scandinavian Studies Program-Birgitta Holm, "Female Creativity:
Recent Research in Scandinavian Feminist Literary Criticism," 8 p.m.,
West Conference Room, Rackham.
Meetings
Asian American Association-6 p.m., Trotter House.
Christian Science Organization- 7:30p.m., League.
The Reader's Theatre-8:30 p.m., Rm. 2013 Angell Hall.
Miscellaneous
Institute of Gerontology-Seminar, "Urinary Incontinence Among the
Aged." 1:30 p.m.. Rm. 3121. 400 North Ingalls.

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