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April 16, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i
9
4
R
t
a
r
C

Committee
callsfor
med tech
te en
By ROB FRANK
The University should discontinue its
medical technology program, accor-
ding to a recommendation made by a
special review committee. The discon-
tinuance has also been endorsed by the
University's central administration.
The Board of Regents is expected to
approve the proposal Thursday at its
monthly meeting.
THE DECISION by the peer review
committee ends a year of speculation
by faculty members and students about
what will happen to the program, which
despite acknowledged excellence has
consistently cost the University of
$180,000 to maintain.
A questionable demand for the
program was another reason the com-
mittee recommended its termination.
The need is diminighed because the
University's program is one of 23 in
medical technology programs in the
state.
. For Sandra Gluck, director of the
medical technology program, the
recommendation is difficult to accept.
She countered the claim that the
program is too expensive by pointing to
other related programs. "It is expen-
sive," she said, "but no more so than
any allied health program."
GLUCK DISAGREES with several
points of the committee's report.
Among these is a concern for freshmen
who came to the University planning to
enter the 'program after their
sophomore year.
While the recommendation will allow
students accepted in the program to
complete their studies, students who
have not yet applied will not be allowed
to begin.
Diana Slowiejko, a freshman from
Warren Mich., selected the University
over Wayne State and Michigan State
Universities because of the medical
technology program.
"I have to change my career
decision," she said. "At first I thought
about transferring but now I'm taking
it as an omen that maybe I should go in-
to something else."
Termination of the program will
mean Slowiejko will need to enroll for
an additional year to make up credits
she will need for her new program.
"It's really frustrating," she added. "If
I had known this I probably would have
gone to a different school."

Columbia

University

says

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, April.16, 1985- Page 3

police won't be called in

By KERY MURAKAMI
Students at Columbia University
gained some breathing room yesterday
when university President Michael
Sovern reportedly vowed to Rev. Jesse
Jackson that he would not use police
force to end the anti-apartheid protest
of 400 Columbia students.
The students who have been
blockading the entrance to the univer-
sity's Hamilton Hall-a building which
houses classrooms and administration
offices-have constantly been
threatened with police action since the
protest began 10 days ago.
But Jackson, speaking with student
leaders after his meeting with Sovern,
said that the university president had
assured him that he will not use police
force to disrupt the protest. The
president also agreed to set up a
meeting with Ivy League presidents
next Friday to discuss divestment of.
stocks in companies that do business
with South Africa, Jackson added.
"It is a victory in that we are no

longer threatened," said student leader
Tony Glover, a Columbia senior. "As
long as we can sustain the protest, we
do not have to worry about facing the
police."
When asked how the students would
do against a long waiting game, Glover
said that the students are extremely
committed: "We're pledged to stay
here at least until we graduate," he
said.
President Sovern was unavailable for
comment.
The protesters also received a legal
buffer yesterday when New
York State Appellate Court Judge Max
Bloom refused the university's request
to annul a restraining order New York
State Supreme Court justice Bruce
Wright had ordered last week. The or-
der prohibits the university from taking
police action against the students.
"Even if Sovern goes back on his
promise, we still have some security,"
Glover said.
"The trustees and President Sovern

have realized that with the national
support we've gotten, it would be un-
wise to call the cops in," said C. Vernon
Mason, one of the attorneys for the
protesters.
For the students, Jackson's presence
was a ''needed pump in the arm,"
Glover said. "Jackson being here puts
the focus of this protest nationally."
Rev. Jackson, speaking to the 400
protesters and approximately 2,500
spectators from the steps of Hamilton
Hall, praised the students saying that
"without protests, the university can
live proudly by day and sleep at night with an
economic prostitute."
Jackson also urged an escalation of
the protest to other campuses around
the country, said Columbia sophomore
John Clavens, a member of the protest.
The demonstrators are trying to per-
suade the university to divest its $39
million in stocks it has invested in 26
companies that do business in South
Africa.

Daily Photo by AIISA BLOCK
Garbage man
David Galvin talks about household hazardous waste yesterday at the
Chrysler Center on North Campus. The conference resumes today at 9:30
a.m.
'Exorcists' liberate bikes

M[SA condemns
By AMY MINDELL and void" due to i
Officials of the Michigan Student the elections and
Assembly said yesterday that they One-fifth of Bu
were upset with the chairman of the needed to sign ap
Student Organization Board for writing changes to the B
a letter that said the April 10 Bursley the ballot.
elections were fraudulent. Page said, how
The chairman, Homer Thiel, did not declared Thiel's1
have the authority to nullify the elec- til today's meetin
tions, according to outgoing MSA
president Scott Page. MSA does not
have the power to nullify a student U
organization's election, Page said. n L . I
Thiel wrote the letter in response to a
complaint from a Bursley resident.
Thiel proclaimed the elections "null21

unofficial
inadequte publicity for students in B
for a lack of petitions. complaints, th
rsley residents were another petitio
petition before placing tion," he said.
ursley amendment on
"I realize no
ever, that he officially said Thiel. "Bu
letter "unofficial" un- had a legitimat
ng. "If 20 percent of the feel the election

letter
ursley have legitimate
ey can go out and get
n to create a new elec-
ow that it was wrong,"
t I thought the residents
e complaint. They didn't
nwas fair."

t
t
e
t
t
r
A
0
*t
f
1
A

(Continued from Page 1)
"That's another part of it," Austin
said. "There will be a bucket drive
going on later today. They (Bikes Not
Bombs) play a really important role
because there's a real transportation
crisis there."
After the exorcism, the 16 green bikes
were turned over randomly to people on
the Diag. The recipients may use the
bikes as long as they want. But in
keeping with the cooperative spirit,
they will never actualy own the two-
wheelers. And, of course, locking the
bikes to a rack is out of the question.
LSA junior. Paul McNaughton, the
proud user of an olive-drab clunker,
vowed he will never clamp a lock on the
bike.
"No, No," McNaughton said, "the
green bike will not be locked."
The exorcism became passionate and
intense at times, especially when some
of the exorcists figuratively sucked the
dark spirits from the bicycles. But one
observer said he did not get anything

out of the ceremony.
"No, not really," said business school
senior Scott Kudialis. "The thing I en-
joyed about it was that it was a
celebration of spring. Everybody's out
just congregating at the Diag. That to
me is what it was all about."

INDIAN LAW DAY
April 16, 3p.m. - 6p.m.
Hutchins Hall, Rm. 150, U of M Law School
SPEAKERS, Film, Reception.
Sponsored by: M.S.A., L.S.S.S., N.L.G., N.A.S.A, Student Services, Rackham Graduate Students, A.I.L.S.A.

aU
su

new Classified
blet section!
Let us put a new
lease in your life.

p,

what the Daily has now .. .

TUESD VEDNE

'R.U

RD

V

-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
The School of Music will present Berlioz's symphony "Harold In Italy"
and the Prokofiev cantata "Alexander Nevsky" in Hill Auditorium at 8 p.m.
The performance features violist Donald McInnes, the University Symphony
Orchestra, Chamber Choir, University Choir, Men's Glee Club, and the Cen-
tral Michigan University Concert Choir. "Harold In Italy" will be conducted
by Gustav Meier; Patrick Gardner will lead "Alexander Nevsky."
Performances.
Ark - New talent night, Lui Collins, 8 p.m., 637 S. Main St.
School of Music - recitals: piano, Elizabeth Steen, 8 p.m., Recital Hall;
voice, Jennifer Hilbish, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
English Language & Literature - fiction reading, Mary Robison, 8 p.m.,
W. Conference Room, Rackham.
Speakers
Geological Sciences - Robert Folk, "Black is Beautiful on the Italian
Riviera," 4 p.m., Rm. 4001 CC Little Building.
IATA - Geo McRobie, "Choices in Technology Today: Is Small Still
Beautiful?" 7 p.m., Michigan Union Ballroom.
Computing Center - Forrest Hartman, "The Zenith Z-150 as a UMnet
Terminal," 1:30 p.m. & 3:30 p.m., Rm. Z-150ONUBS.
Chemistry - Vladmir Bondybey, "Laser Induced Fluoresence Studies of
Molecular Spectroscopy & Dynamics," 4 p.m., Rm.i1300 Chemistry
Building.
Chinese Studies - Geo Huebner, "A Peek at Chinese Industry," noon,
bane Hall Commons Room.
School of Natural Resources - Nathaniel Reed & Al Hamilton, "Garrison
Diversion," 3 p.m., Rm. 1040 Dana Building.
Psychology - Morris Eagle, "Psycholanalysis & the Personal," 8 p.m.,
Rackham.
Eclipse Jazz - Michael Jewett, "The Harlem Renaissance," 7:30 p.m.,
Crofoot Room, Union.
Meetings
University Alanon - noon, Rm. 3200, Union.
His House Christian Fellowship-7:30 p.m., 925 E. Ann St.
Ann Arbor Go Club - 7 p.m., Rm. 1433 Mason Hall.
Michigan Student Assembly - 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3909, Union.
Turner Geriatric Clinic -10 a.m., 1010 Wall St.
AIESEC-5:15 p.m., Rm. 131 'Business Administration Building.
Society of Minority Engineering Students - 7:30 p.m., Rm. 311 W.
Engineering.
Alanon - no smoking men's group, 6:30 p.m., First Baptist Church, 512 E.
Huron St.
Center for Eating Disorders - 7:30 p.m., Human Growth Center, 2002
Hogback Rd.
Miscellaneous
Beta Alpha Psi - Diane Camp, CPA Review - Business Law, 4 p.m., Rm.
1018, Paton Center.
Program in American Institutions - workshop, 3 p.m., Pond A & B, Union.
Continuing Medical Education-two-day program, William McCune,
"Rheumatoid Arthritis & Lupus," Towsley Center.
Microcomputer Education Center - workshop, Microsoft Word (session
N 0- 13A - - . trX21.704, l,.. .. . 4 - - .

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Ford is back on campus with FORD
GREAT START DAY! Come see, kick, and

feel the latest cars and trucks from Ford Div]
sion and ask about the special values availably

i-
le

- to your campus community.
0-
Win a
' Saillboard

"

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M &FMI

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Fill out the entry form below and drop
it off at FORD GREAT START
°. DAY. The winning entry will be

F o
o ,

CO-SPONSORED BY

UAC

EDIATRICS

IWIN,
(Compi
I Name
I Addres
IPhone

drawn at the end of your school's
GREAT START DAY event!
4
mmm mmm
iliu

A SAILBOARD FROM FORD!
lete this form for a chance to win. Please print.)

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