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April 13, 1985 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-13

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Ninety-five Years
EI rof
IEditorial Freedom

cl be

L it 4

i3Iai1j

Shucks
Mixed clouds and sunshine with
scattered showers in the after-
noon. High in the low 60s.

Vol. XCV, No. 154 Copyright 1985, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan-Saturday, April 13, 1985 Fifteen Cents Eight pges

Heatley
promotes
. 'U'police
department
By STACEY SHONK
Women who want to improve campus
safety should lobby for a state Senate
bill that would make it easier for
universities to deputize their security
personnel, the University's Director of
Safety told the Academic Women's
Caucus yesterday.
"If you're interested in campus
safety, particularly women's safety,
this is something we need," Leo
Heatley told a group of about 20 faculty
members. He asked them to contact
their representatives and support the
measure.
THE BILL, introduced in February to
the Senate Education Committee by
Jerry Hart (D-Saginaw), would gave
universities the option of establishing
their own police departments without
the permission of city or county police
agencies.
Similar versions of the bill have been
proposed in previous years, but have
either died in committee or been
defeated on the Senate floor.,
But Keith Molin, assistant to the
University's vice president for state
relations, speculated that this year's at-
tempt to get the bill passed would be
successful.
"THERE IS reason to believe that it
may pass this year, he said. "The
universities that want this bill have got-
ten together, and they realize that
they'll have to rework what (the op-
ponents) don't like to get it passed."
The University has a contract with
the Ann Arbor police department to
provide police protection. Three
* security systems - medical campus
See SAFETY, Page 3
Altern
By CAROLINE MULLER
For some people, having a career
means a 9 to 5 job and making money.,
But for others there is an "alternative"
approach to both working .and living.
About 50 students gathered in East
Quad last night to hear three speakers
talk about career choices that involve
no bosses and no bureaucracy.
THE EVENT CALLED The Alter-
native Career Fair, is the fourth annual
event of its kind. It will continue today
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and will feature
workshops hosting professionals in law,
medicine, education, art, and business
who have opted for an alternative

S.

African

exile

urg9es
By NANCY DRISCOLL
A member of the African National Congre
called for the violent overthrow of the South A
nment, and appealed to University students a
join in the movement against apartheid.
David Ndaba, a member of the African Natio
delegation to the United Nations, told a crowdo
Rackham.West Conference Room that "each a
son opposed to apartheid must become a fight
- politically or a fighter militarily."
NDABA, A 31-YEAR-OLD South African exile
experienced the government's policy of racial d
first hand, and called the system a "policy of ger
"People are being killed day in and day out
workers go on strike, the police open fire," he
than 1,000 people are arrested every day in pr
theid laws."
Ndaba said the time had come for people to pr

overthrow
against the system. "People's patience is not endless. There
ss yesterday comes a time when people have to choose to submit or to
frican gover- fight. We shall not submit. We need to pick up arms," .he
nd faculty to said.
nal Congress Ndaba attacked the Reagan administration's policy of
of about 50 at "friendly persuasion" toward the government of South
nd every per- Africa. "We are told as far as Reagan and (British Prime
er-a fighter Minister Margaret) Thatcher are concerned, they are op-
posed to violent change in South Africa, when all these years
e, said he has violence has been unleashed against the African people," he
iscrimination said.
nocide." "If each and every American today knew what the gover-
. When black nment is supporting, they would be up in arms against
said. "More Reagan," he said. "There hasn't been any system in the
otest of apar- world so condemned excepted Nazism. The U.S. did not have
otest violentl See APARTHEID, Page 3

l V~aL ivllIILy

Columbia sit-in gains support

By KERY MURAKAMI
Special to the Daily
NEW YORK - An anti-apartheid
protest at Columbia University con-
tinued to gain momentum yesterday as
protesters thwarted efforts to remove
them from the steps of Columbia's
Hamilton Hall.
The blockade of one entrance to the
hall began eight days ago when 20
students chained the doors of the ornate
builiding and held a sit-in on its steps.
SUPPORT FOR the protest continued
to grow, and yesterday nearly 500
protersters - mainly students - lear-
ned that New York Supreme, Court
Justice Bruce Wright had refused to
cancel a restraining order he issued
against Columbia Wednesday.
The order prohibits the University

from taking police action against the
supporters until late Monday afternoon.
"It's Columbia zero, the people vic-
tory !" students' attorney Randolph
Scott-McLaughlyn proclaimed last
night as he told the jubilant crowd of
Wright's decision.
McLaughlyn warned the crowd that it
is now facing an "angry beast" even
though "it is highly likely they will not
take any action until Monday."
MCLAUGHLYN said the fact that the
University tried to reverse the order,
showed that they wanted to use police
force. He said police probably would be
called in after the order ends Monday at
4 p.m.
He added that it would not be in
violation of the order if University
security guards were called to' break
I... -

the chains.
Shortly after waking up in the their
sleeping bags on the steps of Hamilton
Hall, the protersters learned of a rumor
that university security officers plan-
ned to gain access to the hall and cut the
chains on the door.
BUT INSTEAD, associate d.ean
Michael Rosenthal asked the students
to '"clear a path." Receiving no answer,
he left as students flashed "peace" and
"Black Power" signs.
After hearing that security guards
might break the chains, the demon-
strators entered heated discussion.
They agreed unanimously to sit on the
steps of the hall, offering no active
defiance to whoever' tried to get

Lilliput Daily Photo by STU WEIDENBACH
Lp
Architecture school senior Kate Hauserman displays her final design
class project yesterday in the Diag.

ative jobs offer success

v

career.
One speaker, former University
student Kim McReynolds, said she was
"restricted" and "didn't fit in" during
her days on campus. But when she
joined the Community Action Coalition
of Englewood in Chicago two years ago,
she "put (her) beliefs where (her)
mouth and feet and stomach were."
She refused to let anyone be her boss
and now organizes private and sub-
sidized housing for tenants.
MCREYNOLDS SAID "there is no
one way" of social change. "This isn't
the 1950s anymore-confrontation is-
important." She says the purpose of her

job is to create conflict..
The most important quality in her
work, she explains,.is having "common
sense." Book smartness doesn't help.
To John Weber, who is a student at
the Queens College Law School, an
alternative lifestyle could mean being a
janitor, mopping up toilets and
listening to loud music.
"BY THE TIME I was a junior," he ex-
plained, "I had a fantastic grade point
average, but was incredibly unhappy."
Weber, who also graduated from the
University, is in the first class at the
recently-opened school which stresses
law as a means of servicing human

needs.
The school has no grade point
average criterion for admissions, and
Weber only had to write a few pages
illustrating why he wished to become a
lawyer.
WEBER IS involved in a work/study
program in Queens, where half of his
week is spent volunteering for legal
services in New York City. His average
client has an annual income of $4,000 or
less.
Weber described the typical law
school as teaching the student for three
years "to learn that there is a certain
truth that only lawyers can have."'

f
f
c
t
.
i

Speaker defends proposed anti-porn law
ByBARBARA LOECHER "the graphic sexually explicit subordination of MacKinnon said she doesn't consider her proposal
Debate over a proposal that would provide a basis women" and includes a provision under which a incompatible with the United States Constitution's
forsuingorngraprhsthassplituld idertariasns woman victimized while appearing in pornography First Amendment protections guaranteeing
for suing pornographers has split libertarian, can file suit against pornographers involved in coer- freedom of expression "Coercion, force, assault are
feminist, and fundamentalist Christian groups. cion, trafficking and force. activities and trafickiing in female sexual slavery is
"You split everyone and then you hear that this is a "In porn we see women and children bound, bat- not speech because it is a business," she said.
right-wing thing," Catherine MacKinnon, co-author tered, tortured and killed," she noted. "To the women Absent from the ordinance is the provision
of the proposal which was introduced in Minneapolis, and children, being in the film means being bound, prohibiting the dissemination of pornography.
told an audience of about 150 gathered at the Law battered tortured and, sometimes, killed." But omission of the provision has not calmed the
School yesterday. "THIS IS not morals legislation," MacKinnon nerves of many civil libertarians and feminists who
MACKINNON has been criticized by many who say have different views of trafficking. "I consider it a
the proposal has a conservative - even moral - argued. "If the subhuman status of women were great first step to even be talking about (pornography
flavor. regarded as debatable, it would be moral legislation)," said Women's Studies student Jennifer
The proposed ordinance defines pornography as legislation."SeSPAEag3
r ~... .. .......,.....

Women a
opting for
sex before
marriage

WASHINGTON (AP) - Only about
one Amerian woman in five waits until
marriage to begin sexual activity, ac-
cording to government statistics
disclosed yesterday.
This was a decline from an earlier
figure of nearly half who postponed
sexual intercourse, a survey said.
The decline, which appeared to occur
most sharply between 1965-69 and 1970-
74, was reported as part of the National
Survey of Family Growth, a study of
childbearing, contraceptive practices,
and maternal health conducted in 1982

but the National Center for Health
Statistics.
The statistics do not include figures
for men because the survey is designed
to analyze fertility and childbearing,
and thus seeks information only from
women in the childbearing ages of 15 to
44, said Marjorie Horn, who wrote the
study with Christine Bachrach.
"The proportion of women who
delayed sexual intercourse until
marriage declined from 48 percent
among women marring during the
period 1960-64, to 21. percent among

women marrying in the years 1975-79',"
the authors wrote.
The largest decline appears to have
occured between 1965-69, when 42 per-
cent of women marrying for the first
time had not previously had intercour-
se, and 1970-74, when only 28 percent
had delayed intercourse, the study said.
Trends in marital and premarital bir-
ths in the United States reflect
changing patterns of marriage, divor-
ce, and premarital sexual behavior, the
study concluded.

Doily Photo by STU WEIDENBACH
Doggie bag
Chico the Dog sits outside a Nickels Arcade store yesterday.

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TODAY
Kudos to South Quad
T HAT TOWERING monolith at the corner of
Madison and Monroe Streets known as South Quad
often sends out conflicting reputations. It has the
rentation nf being an "animal house." vet studen-

South Quad Chronicles, a six to ten page newsletter which
appears regularly every two weeks and which even has
paid advertising, and the high attendance records and ac-
tive participation by the dormitory's three representatives
to RHA James Marchant, Jana Steiger, and Mike Ross.
Moreover, South Quad fits what Greenwald calls "not just a
place where you live. It's a place where you develop in-I
tellectu.11v nia11v land nertmnnllv_ "Toard that Pnd the

Fix-up time
Question: Where can you see as many as 25 bikes at once
of all makes and ages? Answer: Not at a bike shop, but
behind one. And none are for sale. Owners of The Bike Shop
on S. Forest have set up a mini do-it-yourself-fix-it behind
their store for students. Jim Loy, owner of The Bike Shop,
savs hes ets nut the tnool and air nmn durin hiuiness

out here working on their bikes," Loy says. Just one word of
warning: Watch out for the mechanics and tanners from
the leather store next door, who frequently throw a few
hoops during their lunch hour-smack in the center of Loy's
fix-it lot.
On the inside..

i

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