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April 11, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MSA election draws
more voters to polls
(Continued from Page 1 of name recognition (in the dorm). But
MSA election official Noreen Ball two of my members are at (fraternity
claimed the 1985 elections were the functions) so we're a little short han-
niost successful of the past decade in ded. I'm glad its almost over."
terms of voter turnout and election Paul Josephson, VOICE presidential
organization. She attributed this to in- candidate said his campaign is going
creased enthusiasm among' the can- well, but it all depends on "which
didates, voters and election staff. people voted." Josephson said he had
Ball said she anticipated topping last stationed VOICE members at the
years' voter turnout of 5,000. Rob remaining polling locations.
Markus, MSA's Election Director Kevin Michaels and Thomas Salvi,
estimated the number around 6,000 to the executive candidates for the MUM
7,000. party also rallied at South Quad. They
ALL THREE presidential candidates were joined by zealous MUM party
were on hand at South Quad yesterday members who actively solicited votes
appealing to hungry residents on their from each passer-by.
way to dinner. Alex Diana, presidential Though Michaels felt good about the
candidate for the MOVE party had race, he won't mind losing.
previously pledged to "mobilize South "We've already won a significant vic-
Quad" into voting the MOVE ticket into tory by bringing the matter of the
office. proper role of a student government to
'Diana said MOVE had gained "a lot the student's attention," he said.
g - HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Tonight the Ark brings two folk favorites to town. David Mallet and Bon-
nie Raitt will perform for two shows, at 8 and 10:30 at the Ark, 637 S. Main
Street.
Films
MED- Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, 7:30 p.m.; A Streetcar Named Desire, 9:30
* p.m., Nat. Sci. Auditorium.
AAFC-Gentleman's Agreement, 7 p.m.; To Kill A Mockingbird, 9 p.m.,
Aud. A, Angell.
Romance Languages/Russian and East European Studies-Virtues of
People from Bucovina; Avram Iancu; Ceramics-Millenary Art; Philip the
Kind, 7:30 p.m., Aud. B, Angell.
Performances
Department of English Language and Literature-George Garrett, fiction
reading, 4 p.m., East Conference Room, Rackham Building.
Performime-Der Bersuch der Alpen Dame, play by Friedrich Deurren-
matt, 7:30 p.m., Auditorium, East Quad.
School of Music-Nancy Hueber, piano, 6 p.m.,; Laura Bird, cello, 8 p.m.,
Recital Hall, School of Music; William Ransom, piano, 8 p.m., Rackham
Assembly Hall; Jazz Band, 8 p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall, Rackham
Building.
PTP- Cloud Nine, 8p.m., Tureblood Theater, Frieze Building.
Performance Network-Extremities, 8 p.m., 408 W. Washington Street.
Music at Mid Day-Jane Carl, clarinet, 12:15 p.m., Pendleton Room,
Union.
y ,
Speakers
Center for Japanese Studies-Mike Thornton, "Konketsuji- Amer-Asian
Children in Japan," noon, Lane Hall Commons.
Department of English-Kathryn Gravdal, "Semiotics of Medieval
Scatology: Poetic Language or Cultural Discourse," 8 p.m., West Conferen-
ce Room, Rackham Building.
Department of Near Eastern Studies-Salma Jayyusi, "The Image of
_ Women As Depicted By Arab Women," 8 p.m., East Conference Room,
Rackham Building.
UM Computing Center-Bob Parnes and Forrest Hartman, "Telecon-
ferencing in MTS, Part II," 3:30 p.m., room 171, Business Administration
Building.
Chemistry- Paul Hung, "Path Integral Methods in Non-Equilibrium
Thermodynamics," 4 p.m., room 1200, Chemistry Building.
Museum of Zoology/Biological Sciences-Scott Lanyon, "Molecular Per-
spective on Higher Level Relationships in the Tyrannoidea," 4 p.m., lecture
room 1, MLB.
School of Business Administration-William Rukeyser, "Business and the
Press: A Strategic View," 4 p.m., Hale Auditorium, School of Business Ad-
ministration Buiding.
Ophthy/Psychiatry/Physiology/Bio-Engineering-John Ross, "Smooth
and Sampled Motion," 12:15 p.m., room 2055, Mental Health Research In-
stitute.
IEEE-Linus Cordes, "GaAs MMICs (Monolythic Microwave ICs),"

noon, room 1042, East Engineering Building.
Latino Sttidies Program-Fernando Penalosa, "Trilingualism in the
Barrio: Mayan Indians in Los Angeles," 7 p.m., Kuenzel Room, Union.
Medical Chemistry- Andy Kawasaki, to be announced, 4 p.m., room 3554,
-CC Little Building.
Kelsey Museum-Fred Albertson, "Cesnola and Cyprus," new exhibit
opening, 8 p.m., Aud. D, Angell.
Center for Research of Social Organization-Dan Steimetz, "Analyzing
Qualitative Interviews: A Report on a Study of Political Thinking," 12:10
p.m., room 4051, LSA Building.
New World Agriculture Group/Land, Food and Justice Community of In-
terfaith Council for Peace-Mark Richie, "The Farm Debt Crisis," 8 p.m.,
room 231, Angell.
Meetings
University AA-noon, room 3200, Union.
Center for Eating Disorders-7 p.m., First United Methodist Church, State
and Washtenaw.
Psychiatry-Anxiety Disorders Support Group, 7:30 p.m., 3rd floor Con-
ference Room, Children's Psych Hospital.
Baptist Student Union-7 p.m., room D, Michigan League.
Agape Christian Fellowship-6:30 p.m., S. Quad Minority Lounge.
Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, 7 p.m., Union.
School of Business Administration-Beta Alpha Psi, 4 p.m., Michigan
Room, School of Business Administration.
Miscellaneous
Scottish Country Dancers-Beginners 7 p.m.; intermeds 8 p.m., Forest
Hills Community Center, 2351 Shadowood.
League-International night, Thailand, 5 p.m., Cafeteria, Michigan
League.
CRLT-Paul Stemmer Jr., "Statistics on a Small Computer," workshop, 3
& 7 p.m., room 4212, School of Education.
Microcomputer Education Center-"Orientation to Macintosh,"
workshop, 3 p.m., room 3113, School of Education.
Tau Beta Pi-Tutoring, lower-level math, science, and engineering, 7
p.m., room 307, UGLI; 8 p.m., room 2332, Bursley; 7 p.m., Alice Lloyd Red

s Ns
Joe student fills out those foreboding financial aid forms, contemplating
whether to cut back on the stereos or the trips to the Bahamas.
Uedi

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, April 11, 1985 - Page 3
Students rush
to met dedlin
for fnancial aid

By RACHEL GOTTLIEB
Though April 15 is better remem-
bered as the day when income tax
returns are due, it is also the day when
students can submit their financial aid
applications.
The University's Office of Financial
Aid says that late applications will be
processed, but not until all others have
been handled.
ONE CHANGE from the past years is
that the federal governmeent will this
year require all students, not just those
from families with incomes exceeding
$30,000 to undergo a "need analysis" to
determine loan eligibility.
In the past, students whose families

earned less than $30,000 were
automatically eligible for federal loans.
In a newsletter from the University,
the financial aid office said that funding
for the Michigan Competitive Scholar-
ship is likely to increase for the 1985-86
school year.
Students may also have a better
chance of getting one of the awards
because the minimum ACT qualifying
score is going to be lower, the newslet-
ter said.
The deadline for Guaranteed Student
Loan applications for the fall term only
is July 5. Applications for the fall/win-
ter term will be accepted until October
25.

k

(Continued from Page )
science and engineering."
AMERICA must meet the challenge
of increasingly complex technology and
foreign competition by emphasizing
basic research, Bloch said. He added
that "greater attention must be paid to
coordinating the different parts'of in-
dustry, which he feels will "place ad-
ditional strains on the higher
education system."
To develop talent in higher education,
Bloch advocated a more multi- ~
disciplinary approach in engineering
and science education.
"As the nature of science and
engineering change, the social struc-
ture must change. Traditional
disciplinary boundaries are breaking
down in science and engineering.
Students should be prepared for life in a
wide range of fields."
Bloch said he anticipates resistance
Apartheid
protest
continues
(Continued from Page 1)
spired by your defiance."
Other speakers including Barbara
Ransby, formerly a leader of the
Columbia Coalition for Free Africa and
currently a graduate student at the
University .of Michigan, echoed the
message.
"I'm happy to see students acting in a
course of conviction," she told the
cheering crowd, "Involvement in this
movement is education in itself. For
once morality controls Columbia," she
said.
"What we do will encourage others to
do the same action," said Cathrine, a
Columbia student who wouldn't give
her last name.
Daily staff writer Kery Murakami
contributed to this story.
U. Council
addresses
safety issue
(Continued from Page 1)
Eric Schnaufer, a first year law
student on the council, said the system
would not be punitive in nature.
Therefore, he said, students who are
suspended should get a tuition refund.
Schnaufer also said any suspension
would not be noted on a student's tran-
scipt, and any decision about suspen-
sion could be appealed.
The plan, which was not formally ap-
proved, was an attemptto address a
complaint the University ad-
ministration has frequently voiced:
that it is virtually powerless to stop a
student suspected of committing a
violent crime from returning to cam-
pus.
Previous drafts of the proposed code
mandated that the University set up an
internal system to judge whether a
student violated the code.
The council, composed of three
students, three faculty members, and
three administrators, did not go into the
details of how the new plan would work.
Some questions that remain unan-
swered are who would decide to
suspend a student,, how the appeal
system would work, and whether to in-
clude faculty and staff in the plan.

from universities in offering a broader
education.
\ RESEARCH
Send $2 for catalog
N ~assistshe
of over 16,000 topics to
assyour research ef-
fortsor info., call toll-
free 1-800-621-5745 (in I-
linois call 312-922-0300).
Authors' Research, Rm 800N, .
i 407 S. Dearborn, Chicago, IL 80805

The University of Michigan Speech and
Hearing Camp will hold an information
meeting in Anderson Room A of the
Michpigan Union on April 11 at 7:00 p.m.
Persons interested in counselor,
art supervisor, :nurse, and secretary ,
positions are invited to attend.
Beverages will be provided. For further
information contact Colin A. Macpherson
at 764-4493.

im GEYER TDL. - Mil M , pw 1U

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