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April 09, 1985 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-09

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, April 9, 1985 - Page 3

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UAW head criticizes
U.S. auto import policy

GRAND RAPIDS (UPI)-The United States is now expor-
ting dollars instead of goods, United Auto Workers President
Owen Bieber told the Grand Rapids Economic Club yester-
day.
The over-valued American dollar is costing the country
millions in trade each year, Bieber said, and is the key factor
in the current $37 billion trade deficit with Japan.
BIEBER SAID the Reagan administration decision to
allow the voluntary auto-import restraint agreement with
Japan to expire will cost up to 200,000 "good-paying jobs,"
but will not translate into lower prices for consumers.
"Don't look for a bonanza in reduced car prices," Bieber
said. "The facts are just not there to support that contention,
and, in fact, small car prices rose only about half of the Con-
sumer Price Index under the voluntary restraints."
Bieber said a UAW-backed bill will be introduced in

Congress after the Easter recess aimed at attacking the
current $37 billion trade deficit with Japan.
"WE HAVE TO start ratcheting that figure down to a level
resembling fair trade," he said, adding that the proposed
legislation would apply "an X-factor" annually to reduce the
deficit, plus limit to no more than one-third the total trade
with any one nation in a single sector.
Of the recent decision by the Canadian UAW to split from
the U.S. arm, Bieber said about $36 million in Canadian
dollars would be set aside from the union's strike fund to
protect Canadian members against their employers and that
the Canadians will, in turn, repay about $23 million at
American rates for union buildings, local union mortgages
and per capita loans.
"It's about a wash and makes good common sense on this
side of the border, too," he said.

Opening day outdrawsclasses

(Continued from Page 1)
the ultimate sin. "I missed two classes
to watch this game," he said.
Similar hysteria was rampant
throughout campus-there were even
reports of teaching assistants can-
celling class to watch the game.
AT HAIR TRENDS Barber Shop,
employees showed their spirit by
bringing in a TV and setting a Tiger hat

next to it. Owner Bob Cantin ever
thought of "closing shop and bringing in
a keg" for the game.
At Charley's, Tiger fans showed up
for beer, pizza, and nine innings of
Tiger-Indian action. LSA junior John
Bacon explained that he wasn't able to
make it to a World Series. game last
year when the Tigers became world

champions, but he did "get a piece of
right field." LSA junior Mike Collins
skipped class to come to Charley's for
the game, but fortunately the class he
missed was "only French." His
brother, LSA senior Dave Collins,
agreed with Mike's attitude. "I don't
have class on Mondays, but if I did, I
wouldn't be there," he said. -

Cambridge prop oses

128 rebels killed, Nicaragua claims

.From United Press International
The Nicaraguan Defense Ministry
reported yesterday that government
troops killed 128 rebels and wounded 22
others in fighting during the last week
of March across the country's northern
provinces.
In El Salvador leftist guerrillas

trying to overthrow the U.S.-backed
government exploded three electricity
line towers cutting power to 50 towns in
three provinces, officials said.
SOME 15,000 rebels of the
Nicaraguan Democratic Force, or
FDN, concentrate their fighting in nor-
thern Jinotega, Nueva Segovia and

Highlight
The Center for Population Planning and the School of Public Health are
sponsoring a symposium to honor the late Dr. Leslie.Corsa Jr. The sym-
posium "Malthus Meets Marx in the People's Republic of China: Fertility,
Population Growth, & Economic Development in the World's Most Populous
State," will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Auditorium of the School of Public
Health II.
Films
Hill St. - 2001: A Space Odyssey, 8p.m.,1429 Hill Street.
Performances
Ark - New Talent Night, Andrew Calhoun, 8 p.m., 637 South Main Street.
K" School of Music - Campus Orchestra, 8 p.m., Recital Hall; viola recital,
Robert Michalowski, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
PTP - Cloud 9,8 p.m., Trueblood Theater, Frieze Building.
Speakers
Cellular & Molecular Biology - Jerald Feitelson, "Cloning & Charac-
terization of Streptomyces Genes Involved in Undecyloprodigiosin Biosyn-
thesis," noon, Room 1139, Nat. Sci.
Chemistry - John Bercaw, "Carbon Hydrogen Bond Activation With
Organometallic Derivatives of Scandium," 4 p.m., Room 1300, Chemistry
Building.
Chinese Studies - Kenneth De Woskin, "The Stone Age Hop & the Zhanuo
Jam," noon, Lane Hall Commons Room..
Computing Center - Bob Barnes & Forrest Hartman, "Teleconferencing
in MTS, Part I," 3:30 p.m., Room 171, Business Administration Building.
Germanic Languages & Literature - Hugo Steger, "Sprache Im Wandel
In Der Bupdersrepublik Deutschland," 8 p.m., Rackham, West Conference
Room.
Engineering - Stephen Lavenburg, "Probablistic Modeling of Computer
System Availability," 4 p.m., Room 2031, East Engineering Building.
Psychology - Howard Shevrin, "The Freudian Unconscious & the
Cognitive Unconscious: Identical or Fraternal Twins?" 8 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheater.
Meetings
Alanon-no smoking men's group, 6:30 p.m., First Baptist Church, 512 East
Huron.
Polish Student American Association - 7 p.m., Union.
Golden Key National Honor society - 7 p.m., Pendleton Room, Union.
Center For g0ating Disorders - Support Groups, 7:30 p.m., Human Growth
Center, Suite 13, 2002 Hogbeck.
University Alanon - noon, Room 3200, Union.
Ann Arbor Go Club-7 p.m., Room 1433, Mason Hall.
Michigan Student Assembly - 7:30 p.m., Assembly Chambers, Room
3909, Union.
Society of Minority Engineering Students - 7:30 p.m., Room 311, West
Engineering Building.
AIESEC-International Business Management Club, 5:15 p.m., Room 131,
Business Administration Building.
Miscellaneous-
His House Christian Fellowship - Bible Study, 7:30 p.m., 925 East Ann
street.
Sidda Yoga Dham - 8-week-class, 6 p.m., Siddha Meditation Ashram, 1522
Hill Street.
Men's Baseball - Wayne State, 3 p.m., Fisher Stadium.
Program in American Institutions - Workshop, "Decision Making in the
National Endowment for the Arts: A.Straight Talk On How To Get Fun-
ding," 3 p.m., Kuenzel Room, Union.
Turner Geriatric Clinic - women of all ages join the Intergererational
Women's Group, 10a.m.,1010 Wall Street.
CRLT - Workshop, Thomas Schwenk, "Group Discussion Teaching
Skills," 7p.m., 109 East Madison.
Ecumenical Campus Center, International Center - slide presentation,
"Reort from South Lebanon - A New Slide Show on South Lebanon," noon,
603 East Madison._

Esteli provinces in their bid to over-
throw the Sandinista government.
"Sandinista Popular Army troops
killed 128 rebels and wounded 22 in five
battles in the northern mountains
during the last week of March," a
Nicaraguan Defense Ministry
statement said.
"The mercenary forces have tried at
all cost to lay a beachhead in the nor-
th," the statement said.
SIXTY-NINE of the rebels were
killed in figiting near the town of
Murra, Nueva Segovia province, some
85 miles north of the capital and 40
others were killed in "fierce combat" in
an isolated section of Jinotega, the
report said.
The government is currently
relocating an estimated 50,000 peasants
from the area to create free-fire zones
and undercut rural support for the
FDN, which often retreats across the
Honduan border to regroup and resup-
ply.
Salvadoran guerrillas downed elec-
tricity line towers along the Northern
Trunk highway overnight, cutting
power to three provinces, officials said.
Some 50 towns in the provinces of
Chalatenango, Norrian and Usulutan
remained without power as of mid-day,
while crews from the government-
owned telecommunications company
tried to reestablish the electric grid.
On the battlefront, military officers
in Usulutan province reported sporadic
fighting late Sunday in the country's
central highlands, which left three
rebels and one soldier dead.
POLICE
N6TES
Student escapes rapist
Ann Arbor police are investigating
an attempted sexual assault, which oc-
curred late- Thursday evening when a
19-year-old female student 'was ac-
costed while jogging near the corner of
Shadford and Harding Streets. Sgt. Jan
Suomala of the Ann Arbor Police said
the woman was grabbed and thrown
against a wall, but was able to escape
before the assailant could remove any
of her clothing.
Cash missing
Sometime before opening on Satur-
day, employees at the State Street Deli
on 800 South State reported that $325 in
cash and food were stolen from the
store.
- Thomas Hrach

sanetuo
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) - Illegal
aliens from Central America and Haiti
who claim they are political refugees
would get moral and other support from
this university city under a proposal
before the city council yesterday.
Under the resolution, city agencies
and employees would not cooperate
with federal efforts to expel the
estimated- 5,000 illegal immigrants
from El Salvador, Gautemala and
Haiti who have fled to this university
city.
THE RESOLUTION also would ex-
tend city services to all Cambridge
residents, whether or not they are U.S.
citizens. Proponents of the measure say

try or nt
refugees worried they will be forced to
prove citizenship may not be seeking
medical treatment or education for
their children.
One purpose of the resolution is to
show support for the refugees, who fear
political persecution, torture, and
death if sent back to their native coun-
tries, said city Councilor. Alice Wolf,
who sponsored the measure.
"Many things start at the local level
and we can't wait for the federal gover-
nment to come around," she said. "I
believe we have an obligation to shelter
people who are being persecuted in
other countries."
The proposed resolution is modeled

on one passed in February by city
councilors in Berkeley, Calif., Wolf
said.
MODELS
NEEDED
For local promotion
Please call 761-5127
CAMPUS PROMOTIONS

The Universityof Michigan
ficeof
F i Clal
Aid

FALL & WINTER 1985-86
APPLICATION DEADLINE
MONDAY, APRIL 15, 1985

2011 Student Activities Building
To ensure equal consideration for financial aid* for the coming school year, continuing students
must submit their application materials by the priority deadline. The application must be re-
ceived by the.Office of Financial Aid and the 1985-86 Family Financial Statement mailed to
ACT by: MONDAY, APRIL 15, 1985
*University Grant, Michigan Opportunity Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, College Work-
Study, National Direct Student Loan, Health Professions Loan, Nursing Loan. The deadline does not apply to
Guaranteed Student Loans of Pell Grant applications.

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