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April 02, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 3

Honors speaker urges broad education

By KYSA CONNETT
"Jobs are tight in the nation's
economy today but we cannot allow
that to permeate our institutions to the
S extent that it discourages the develop-
ment of the whole person."
This was the message U.S. Circuit
Judge Damon Keith brought to a
packed house at the 62nd Annual
Honors Convocation last Saturday af-
ternoon in Hill Auditorium.
Over 3,000 undergraduate students
were honored for their academic
achievement.
KEITH SAID that college students
MSUto
purchase
new sports
act ities
EAST LANSING (UPI) - The
Michigan State University Board of
Trustees will receive Thursday a
proposed $38.5 million funding package
for new sports facilities which features
two student fee hikes.
U nder plan, student fees will be in-
creased by $1 per credit hour for. the
fall, 1985 term and by an additional $1
for the following fall.
The MSU athletic department will
contribute 10 percent of the project
cost, or $3.8 million, with the money
coming from a $2 increase in football
ticket prices and proceeds from the
recent Cherry Bowl football game.
All facilities are supposed to be com-
S pleted by 1988.

today have a strongly materialistic at-
titude, but he does not view the attitude
as totally bad.
"The fact that. our 17- and 18-year-
olds now place economics and upward
mobility at the head of the list as
reasons for attending college perhaps
only shows a healthy maturity not
present in earlier generations."
Yet he said he does object to "letting
this mood of practicality run wild."
Keith stressed studying to learn -
something he termed scholarship - as
opposed to using college merely as a
vocational school.
KEITH POINTED to William Du

Bois, a prominent black protest leader
in the first half of the 20th century who
helped to create the NAACP to em-
phasize the value of scholarship.
DuBois studied philosophy, ethics,
Greek, and German to satisfy his "bur-
ning desire for scholarship, not prac-
ticality," Keith said.
Because Du Bois lived in a time
period filled with dramatic change -
World War II and the rise of America as
a powerful nation - Keith said: "I do
not believe that Du Bois would have
been well served by this day's version
of practical baccalaurate education-
change became exceedingly too fast."

Keith warned: "We are simply not
smart enough to predict what changes
are not in store for us in the future, and
because of that the most fruitful course
for us to take is to elect broad and ever-
expanding scholarship."
During the ceremonies, 543 Angell
scholars - students receiving straight
A's for at least two consecutive terms
- were recognized. Ann Heil was the
only student to receive the award for
eight terms. Michigan alumnus George
Skurla, president of Grumman
Aerospace Corporation, was presented
with the Outstanding Achievement
Award.

Test yourself.
Which early pregnancy test is as
easy to read as red, no -white, yes?
Which is a simple one-step test?
Which has a dramatic color change
to make the results unmistakable?
Which is 98% accurate, as accurate
as many hospital and lab tests?
Which is portable for convenience
and privacy?
E
a)C mow
'Vl
ii SndaIa o

lso oDaily Photo by ALISA BLOCK
Lots ' balls
Students guess at the number of tennis balls in this Fiero yesterday. The winners could receive a color TV among other
prizes. The pontest is sponsored by Zeta Beta Tau fraternity to benefit the American Cancer Society. Tickets, selling for
$1, will be available on the Diag until Thursday.

-H A PPENINGS- RHA panel seeks penalties

- A. lL.AL. adi '4 ..i'14 v . II(Continued from Page 1)

Highlight
"Women, Family Planning and Development: Professional Women's Per-
spectives" will be the topic of a panel discussion at 1:45 p.m. in Rackham
Auditorium. Speakers will be Sharon Camp, executive director of the
Population Crisis Committee in Washington, D.C.; Susan Cochran, senior
economist at the World Bank in Washington; Myra Buvinic of the Inter-
national Center for Research on Women in Washington; and Judith Bruce,
research associate at the Population Council in New York. The panel
discussion is part of the "World Feminization of Poverty Conference."
Films
AAFC - On Dangerous Grounds, 7 p.m.; Johnny Guitar, 8:45 p.m., MLB
3; Straight Through The Heart, 7 & 9p.m., Angell Aud. A.
MFT - Risky Business, 7 & 9 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Performances
Ark - New talent night, Lynn & Liz Shaw, 8 p.m., 637 S. Main St.
School of Music - Arts chorale, 8 p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall; recitals
saxophone students, 8 p.m., Recital Hall; Cello, Karen Krummel, 8 p.m.
Rackham Assembly Hall.
Michigan Union - piano, Annette Lee, 8 p.m., Pendleton Room, Union.
Speakers
Northeastern & North African Studies - Leila Fawaz, "Role Reversals:
Beirut and Damascus in the Past Hundred Years," 4 p.m., E. Conference
Room, Rackham.
Natural Resources - David Hawkins, "Acid Precipitation," 3 p.m., Rm.
1040 Dana Building.
Biostatistics - Nathan Mantel, "Goodness-of-fit Issues in Toxicological
Experiments & Other Problems Relating to the Use of Chi-Square Tests," 4
p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Chinese Studies - Su Shaozhi, "The Future of the Economic Reform Ef-
fort in China," noon, Lane Hall Commons Room.
International Center - Richard Cleaver, "Lebanon's Crisis - A Quaker
Analysis of Facts, Fears, and Future," noon, 603 E. Madison.
Chemistry - William Klemperer, "Structure and Dynamics of van der
Waals Molecules," 4 p.m., Rm 1300 Chemistry Building.
Meetings
University Alanon - noon, Rm. 3200 Union.
His House Christrian Fellowship - 7:30 p.m., 925 E. Ann St.
Ann Arbor Go Club - 7 p.m., Rm. 1433 Mason Hall.
Michigan Student Assembly - 7:30 p.m., Assembly Chambers, Rm. 3909
Union.
Eating Disorder Support Group - 7:30 p.m., 2002 Hogback Rd.
Turner Geriatric Clinic - 10 a.m., 1010 Wall St.
AIESEC - 5:15 p.m., Rm. 131 Business Administration
Society Minority English Studies - 7:30 p.m., Rm. 131, W. Engineering.
Alanon - no smoking men's group, 6:30 p.m., First Baptist Church 512 E.
Huron.
Miscellaneous
Program in American Institution - workshop, 3 p.m., Pond Room A & B,
Union.
CRLT - workshop, Sharon Balius, "Computerized Bibliographic
Databases," 3 p.m., 109 E. Madison St.
English Language & Literature - Fiction reading, Laura Furman, 4 p.m.,
W. conference room, Rackham.
Plantresearch MSU - seminar, Susan Bartlett, "Transport of
Cytoplasmically Synthesized Proteins," noon, Rm. 1139 Nat. Sci.
CMB - seminar, James Walsh, "Evolution of Multigene Families," 4
p.m., Rm. 3056 Nat. Sci.
Oral biology - seminar, Gay Dunny, "Cell surface changes associated
with Streptococcus faecalis sex pheromone response," 4 p.m., Rm. 1100, 300
N. Ingalls.
Women's Law; Studies - forum, Patricia Blau Reuss, "How to Lobby
Congress on Women's Issues, or Whatever Happened to the Civil Rights Act
of 1984," 8 p.m., Faculty dining room, Law School.
Computing Center - lab, Forrest Hartman, "The Macintosh PC as an
MTS Terminal," 1:30 p.m., UNYN Terminal room.
Microcomputer Education Center - workshop, "MicroPro Word Star," 1
n m.- wnrkshnn "Tntrnduetion to Snreadsheetin : MultiPlan on the Macin-

dalism.
The Office of Housing was unable to
estimate the amount of money that
vandalism costs the University every
year.
MEMBERS OF the RHA fire com-
mittee expressed support for Mar-
chant's proposals, but emphasized that
they remain in draft form.
"It's just a petition, a suggestion of
action to the housing office," said
William Halverton, the committee's
chairman.
I just view this as a petition of
residents expressing their concern over
these issues to housing," Halverton
said.
Marvin Parnes, the housing division
assistant director of resident education,
said that he couldn't comment on the
specific RHA proposal because he
hasn't seen it.
HE DID SAY, however, that we look
seriously at any proposal from the
RHA, but this University is generally
more concerned with educative ap-
proaches than judicial ones."
The housing division's 1985 guidelines
entitled "Living at Michigan," state
that "tampering with fire equipment or
Correction
LSA faculty last year approved a set
of faculty guidelines. The Daily in-
correctly reported Sunday that the
guidelines had been rejected.
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ringing false fire alarms are violations
of state law which may result in
criminal prosecution and lease ter-
mination."
Housing Program Director of
Residence Operations Ed Salowitz said
that this constitutes an official housing
policy, and he questions the potential
success of a system of rewards.
"REWARDS GENERALLY haven't
worked on our society. Whether studen-
ts here are going to be any different I
tend to doubt."
RHA President Hegedus said
the committee exceeded its authority in
proposing a list of mandatory fines.
"My reaction to the fines is
negative," he said. "Who's going to
determine guilt? That's getting into a
much broader area than we wanted to."
"The committee was only supposed
to investigate the possibility of setting
up an RHA or Housing reward system. I
was surprised to see the systems of
fines."

The National Bureau of Standards, Department of Commerce has
one of the world's largest laboratories for research in
ROBOTICS
There are currently senior positions available at grades 13, 14,
and 15 in Computer Science, Electronics Engineering, and Me-
chanical Engineering. Salaries are competitive and based on pro-
fessional experience and accomplishments. ($37,599 - $67,940).
These positions are part of the NBS team working to implement in-
telligent and flexible robots for a wide variety of applications.
SOME SPECIFIC TASKS ARE:
-design of new sensor systems
-sensory processing systems
-world modeling databases
-world model interpretation
-robot manipulators
-robotic assembly
-CAD directed assembly
-real-time control systems
-artificial intelligence alogorithms for robotics
-robot programming languages
-robot simulation including real-time graphics
-specific robot applications including: military, manufacturing,
construction and space
-robot performance enhancement
-robot standards
Our program in robotics already has had significant impact on the U.S. appli-
cation of robots. We have the best equipment for research in robotics includ-
ing a full cale experimental factory dedicated to research in industraI'auto-
mation. If 'you would like to be part of this major effort to help revitalize U.S.
INDUSTRY, PLEASE CONTACT Dr. Leonard S. Haynes for technical informa-
tion at this number: 301 -921:2 381, re -pd a0pmprehensive resume to:
ROSEMARY HORMUTH
Room A-123, Admin. Bldg. - National Bureau of Standards
GAITHERSBURG, MD 20899
(301) 921-3711 . U.S. Citizenship is required.
The National Bureau of Standards is an Equal Employment/Affirmative Action Employer

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