100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 29, 1985 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Friday, March 29, 1985

Page 5

Video

festival puts stude'

Pictured above is part of the graphic design used in promotional posters for
the Michigan Media National Student Video Festival.
Musical tour delights

By Marc Taras
I'll put it to you briefly. It's about the
great time that you will have this
weekend as the Michigan Theatre hosts
the second annual Michigan Media
National Student Video Festival. Thds
is going to be top flight entertainment
and an exceptionally professional
production; only this gala affair which
runs Friday and Saturday nights will be
honoring the video art work of high
school and college "student
professionals" from coast to coast. Let
me tell you what I have learned.
The facilities at Michigan Media
(located on Fourth at William on the,
Old West Side) are extensive and state
of the art. The staff is less extensive,
but also state of the art. Alec Friedman,
the director of the festival, allowed that
he and his staff have been putting in
eighty hour weeks preparing for this
weekend's event. They have made
arrangements with cable networks
such as USA and MTV to promote the
festival and the winners will be broad-
cast in a special episode of Nightflight,'
the popular USA network nighttime
video program. Winners are being
flown in to Ann Arbor from all around
the country and will be receiving cash
prizes to boot. General Electric is
providing incredible projection equip-
ment for the festival. What I'm getting
at is thatAlec and his friends have
worked hard and made some heavy
' connections in promoting not only an
event, but first and foremost, the work
of the students.
This is the only venue of its sort
where students may compete solely
with their peers. There is high school
and college competition in each of five
areas: short subject fiction, documen-
tary, educational/instruction, music
video, and commercial/public service
announcement. This year the festival
more than doubled their entries from
last year. You may have seen the lovely
color posters around town or the mar-
velous commercials soliciting entries
and announcing the event on MTV. This
thing gives every indication of
snowballing.
Judges for this year's entries in-
cluded five time Emmy award winner
David D. Connell, vice-president of
Children's Television Workshop. Also
on hand were Hollywood writer Max
Hodge (Quincy, The Waltons, and
Mission: Impossible), and Robert Lar'-
son, general Manager of WTVS Channel
56 (PBS) in Detroit. Among the local
judges is personality and noted jazz
buff Hazen Schumacher. Yeah.

These people are heavyweights and
they are impressed with what they are
seeing. You will be too. I know that I
was amazed when Alec invited me over
to Michigan Media for some previews.
It was more like an a'ppetite-whetting
session. I saw bits and pieces of some
truly remarkable work.
O.K., I admit it. I have an aversion to
basketball. And to commercials. Why is
it, I ask myself. Why is it, then, that I
sat spellbound, heart pounding, wat-
ching a commercial about high school
basketball? Well this is some greattrt!
Perhaps I am all wrong about basket-
ball! No kidding. Commercials this
good would hold your attention better
than most entertainment programming
currently on the tube. How about a
music video with a source as exciting as
Laurie Anderson's "Let X = X." The
video is as bizarre and quirky as her
musical material. One of the entries in
the documentary division has me par-
ticular excited. It is -the story of the
release and "naturalization" of a
domesticated bald eagle. The scenes I
w 'i 1r Lr

LtsupI
previewed were fascinating and
touching. There was one particular
sequence of such unparalleled gran-
deur that it alone would be worth the
price of admission.
Friday night's program will feature
finalists in Short Subject Fiction and
the Educational/Instructional division.
Saturday night will feature the Music
Video, Commercial/Public Service,
and Documentary finalists. Each night
will offer highlights from the entire
range of finalists as well. Acting as co-
hosts for the Festival program will be
two very funny and exciting former
Michigan folks. Dave Coulier recently
appeared on the Tonight Show and is
currently the host of ,N'ickelodeon's
"Out of Control." Mark Cendrowski is
associate producer with the Cagney and
Lacey TV series. I have seen previews
of Coulier. Oh my! This guy is bizarre.
He works doing voices for Hanna-Bar-,
bera cartoons. Look out. Big fun.
The most important aspect of this
weekend's festival is the people who
generated the material. The students.

front
Yeah. Talking with Alec Friedman it
became obvious that his-enthusiasm for
this project was tremendous..His heart
is in the right place ("I haven't updated
my resume for three years!" he
laughs.) Ditto his hard working staff.
The object here is exposure for the
work and honoring the student artists
who are responsible. It's taking off this
Friday and Saturday nights at the
Michigan Theatre at 8 p.m. I'll be there
both nights. I'm won over, O.K.? I am
convinced.
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557
KERASOTES THEATRES
MOVIE DIRECTORY
WAYSIDE 1 & 2
3020 Washtenaw Ave., Ypsilanti, 434-1782
BABY
Fri., Mon.-Thurs.5,7 9
Sat.&sun.1,3,5,7,9
RETURN OF THE JEDI
Fri., Mon.-Thurs. 4:45, 7:05, 9:25
Sat. &Sun.1:30,4:00,6:50, 9:20
CAMPUS THEATRE
1214 S. University - Phone 668-6416
RETURN OF THE JEDI
Fri., Mon.-Thurs. 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
Sat. & Sun. 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
STATEI-~2-3-4
LOCATED IN THE HEART OF Az THEATRE DISTRICT
231 S. State - Phone 662-6264
TICKETS ON SALE 30 MIN. BEFORE SHOW TIME
FRIDAY THE 13th, PART 5
A NEW BEGINNING
Fri., Mon. Thurs. 5:25, 7:30, 9:35
Sat.&Sun.1:10,3:20,5:25,7:30,9:35
BREAKFAST CLUB
Fri., Mon thurs. 5 :25 7 :30 9 :35
Sat. &Sun.1:10,3:20,5:25,7:30,9:35
THE SURE THING
Fri., Mon Thurs.5:20,7:25,9:30
Sat. & Sun.1:05,31,5:20,7:25 930
1984
Fri., Mon-Thurs.5:15,7:20,9:30
Sat.&Sun.1:00,3:10,5:15,7.20,9:30
LATE SHOWS AT STATE
DOORSOPENAT11:45
ALL SHOWS START AT 12:00-ALL SEATS $2.00

By Andy Weine
Perhaps the only drawback to
George Winston's solo concert
Tuesday night at Hill Auditorium was
that the roof prevented you from en-
joying the moon and the warm breezy
night, too, for that. is the most ap-
propriate setting for Winston's
ultimately natural tunes..
Soft-spoken and mellow as the
changes of season he portrays with
piano, Winston delivered a warm and
meditative repertoire that was easily
familiar to any who have heard him
play before. He aroused in the large
hall the air of an intimate meditation
room, as everyone seemed to lapse into
a silent, reflective trance.
His first tunes included a Steven
Reich-influenced song that rung with
the absorbing repetitive quality of a
dulcimer, and another light wandering
of notes which was about looking up at,
aid being with the stars. Million-dollar
seats on the Space Shuttle may be well-
booked for decades, but with Winston's
tunes, well, I. feel I've orbited in space
already. It's an'incredible place to visit,
with Winston as musical guide.
But serene-natural settings are har-
dly the only places where Winston's
Fingers and his listener's minds tour.
On a more upbeat, rollicking note were
his wonderful Peanuts tunes. Exit
Schroeder and his tiny piano; enter
Winston with. a, mammoth grand. Both

create the same playful, upbeat air of a
Peanuts Christmas and of Snoopy dan-
cing on his skates, trying to catch
snowflakes on his tongue. (You can't
convince me that Schroeder didn't ac-
tually play those songs on the screen.)
It's'bound to make any yuppified adult
sentimental for his old cartoon buddies.
You didn't think George Winston
played rollicking swing tunes? Well of
course he can, as he deftly demon-
strated in a bluesy stride song with a
solid ragtime core that nearly became
schizophrenic in its manic middle. Also
in a unique, uncharacteristically Win-
stonian vein were some harmonica
tunes-one "a medley of some old yid-
dish piece" and another a traditional
Spanish folk song-and some fun blues
on a tinkly-sounding instrument that
was a cross between piano and
xylophone.
On the variety of tunes he played,
Winston commented: "I'm feeling ter-
minally eclectic tonight... I guess I'm
feeling kinda intellectual. I think it's
'cause I'm playing on a campus.
Y'know that Pavlovian thing? Well,
anytime I get near chalk, I start feeling
different, acting different!..."
That difference was welcome and
provided good contrasts in his choice of
songs. Still, someone like me who's
devoted to his meditative pieces
couldn't walk away disappointed. Soul-
opening, space-soaring, and Zen-
soothing, Winston's music is spiritual
delight.

SELECTED MEN'S & WOMEN'S STYLES
i INCLUDING LEVI'S, LEE, DEE CEE BRANDS & BIBS
I I I
i WHILE TH EY L AST.
Open 7 201 E. WASHINGTON
Days A
Week To At 4th Ave.
Mcr.,cara Serve You °994-3572
I I
I= I== = = = = == = = = =

1.
2.
3.
4.

FRIDAY THE 13th
BREAKFAST CLUB
THE SURE THING
LET'S SPEND THE NIGHT
TOGETHER

,, ;

9

SYMBOL... young men 16-35
"OF THE MAN WHO
RECEIVES IN GIVING"
FRANCISCANS'
~7iw/ Odzezee 1a'4z

SUMMER CAMP POSITIONS STILL
AVAILABLE AT TAMARACK CAMPS
Bunk Counselors " Specialists in Waterfront, Crafts, Nature,
Photography, Video, Computers, Horseback Riding, Song Lead-
ing " R.O.P.E.S. Course Instructors 9 Trip Leaders " Unit Super-
visors " Secretary " Food Service Staff " Nurse and Clinic "
Assistant " Social Worker " Bus Drivers.
Some positions available as trip leaders and counselors
at Camp Kennedy, Agree Outpost and Teen Adventure
Trips. Also opportunities to work with emotionally im-
paired children at Silverman Village.
FINAL U-M INTERVIEW DATES
APRIL 2 AND 17.
SIGN UP CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
Tamarack is the Jewish residents camp agency sponsored by
The Fresh Air Society of Metro Detroit since 1903

ii -mr, N

New!
Thicker, Juicier
Chop ed teak
Vailue Meals
2 f$or $599
, .,.... pmm~l innWITHCOUPON

' +"I'
1
' d

DIRECTOR OF VOCATIONS, FRANCISCANS, TOR
"20 EDGEWATER PARKWAY
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 20903
Please send me the free booklet at no obligation.
Name MDM
age
Address_

' . .,u111 .

,m II 4

rie for
free
boetj

City State.
(Check preference) Priesthood

Zip
Brotherhood

.1 , ; Id

II' l 11 ir

L 1985
The SUMMER
SESSIONS

Day or evening classes " Wide array of courses in Business, Arts and
Sciences, Education, Nursing " All summer courses applicable to regular
Loyola University degrees. Classes at the Lake Shore, Water Tower, and
Medical Center Campuses. Special this summer: Art and Archaeoiogy
in Mexico.

Ever dinerincude th Wold Biggest, Best Salad t
Bufet' bakned potato and warm roll with butter. ____
-_,; - TChopped Steak
Chopped Stea Value Meals
Value Meals 'I99
2to~99 I. fore5 ,w
~ ~~r ncludes the World's BiggestBs aa ult idO h ol igs Best Salad Bulfet
SIcue two ho dsoup gst(l , Bcnet akBetat-wihtwo hot soups (all you-ca-eat). baked potato 3
2 fwr owithbtsutt(al-rcanotbaediothohr ndwarm roll with butter. Cannot be used with other
an ar ol it h x bn t t r iCian t ingu s eath O ses 3' discounts. Tax n tin l At participating steakhouses.
g o d r n y p a t y s ~ 8 .C o u p o n g o o d o r n a l
ouogodfrValid until 511 2185.Vldutl5115
+ Breakfast special!
uLunch Specials!ThwrlsBigtet
Sand ichwthFenhFre Breakfast Buffets" with Coffee
1 WrdsBgest, Best Salad Buffet"A' o' I& n.E a
Wol t$.49 Al.l-Y. ,,thnt~ sountsBaxt i
11AM-4PM, Mon.-Sat. 7-11AM, Mon--F"I .
r-,Rmr -dwt ohrdscutTx o nn

FIRST SESSION
(6 weeks beginning May 20)
Registration by mail or in person:
MAY 13, 9:00-12:00 NOON
2:00- 6:00 PM

SECOND SESSION
(6 weeks beginning July 2)
Registration by mail or in person:
JUNE 17',-9:00-12:00 NOON
2:00- 6:00 PM

All in-person registrations in the Georgetown Room of the
Marquette Center, 820 North Rush Street, Chicago
Telephone 312/670-3011 or complete the coupon below to receive
a copy of the 1985 Bulletin of The Summer Sessions. The Bulletin

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan