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March 28, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Officials
consider
retaliation
to Soviet
'shooting

WASHINGTON (UPI) - Ad-
ministration officials acknowledged
yesterday that Maj. Arthur Nicholson
was photographing Soviet military
equipment before he was shot by a
Soviet sentry but insisted there was no
justification for the killing.
White House spokesman Larry
Speakes said, . meanwhile, the ad-
ministration is considering
"diplomatic-related steps" in response
to Sunday's shooting in East Germany.
HOWEVER, a senior administration
official said no serious economic or
political sanctions were being con-
sidered. "These are things that would
not exacerbate the relationship," he
said.
Two officials from the Pentagon and
State Department acknowledged
Nicholson, A U.S. military observer,
was photographing Soviet military
equipment on what was formerly

designated a restricted area before he
was killed.
But the officials, speaking on the con-
dition they not be identified, reiterated
the shooting was "completely un-
necessary" and said the fact Nicholson
had no medical attention for an hour
was "particularly inhumane."
"THEY HAD a right to detain him,
but not to shoot him," said one official.
At the White House, Speakes said
possible steps against Moscow are
being discussed, but State Department
spokesman Bernard Kalb had no com-
ment.
Deputy press secretary Bob Sims,
said, for instance, that the Soviet naval
attache, now touring the West Coast
with attaches from other nations, is
being called to Washington to be
delivered a protest.
But he characterized the diplomatic
steps as "no big deal."

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 28, 1985- Page 3
Academic probation
straightens up students

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HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Gene Roberts, executive editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer, will deliver
the fourth annual Kenneth Murray Lecture on the First Amendment at 3:10
p.m. in MLB 3. Roberts' subject will be "After Westmoreland and Sharon:
The Media, Public Figures and the First Amendment." The lecture is spon-
sored by the Department of Communications.
Films
MFT-Woodstock, 8 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Alt. Act.-Atomic Cafe, 7:15& 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Cinema Guild-Club De Femmes, 7 p.m., Les Enfants Terribles, 8:45
p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Performances
Alumni Association-Men's Glee Club,8 p.m., Orchestra Hall, Detroit.
Ark-Ken Whitely, 8 p.m., 637 S. Main St.
Performance Network-Elise Bryant, 8 p.m., 408 W. Washington St.
School of Music-piano recital, Fabia Smith, 8 p.m., Recital Hall; piano
recital, Laura Kargul, 8 p.m., Kerrytown House.
Nectarine Ballroom-band, Tool and Die, 10 p.m., 510 E. Liberty St.
Soundstage-band, The Affect, 8p.m., U-club, Union.
School of Music-Opera, Falstaff by Verdi, 8 p.m., Power Center.
Speakers
Near Eastern & North African Studies-Amal Rassam, "Political
Ideology, Cultural Constraints, & Women in the Arab World," 4 p.m.,
Rackham.
Museum of Art-Mary Kujawski, "Earth Magicians:An Introduction to
the Exhibition,"8 p.m.
Biophysics-TE Creighton, "Experimental Studies of Protein Folding &
Stability," 4 p.m., S. Lecture Hall, Med. Sci. II.
Chemistry-Edgar Westrum, "Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-Ag2S. The
Thermal Circus Tamed," 4 p.m., Rm. 1200 Chemistry Building.
Computing Center-Deb Masten, "Using the IBM-PC & Zenith Z-150
Micros with MTS," 10 a.m., Rm. 2346 School of Education Building.
Western European Studies-John Boyer, "From Cultural Hegemony to
Social Conflict: The Fate of the Germans in East Central Europe," 4:30
p.m., Lane Hall Commons Room.
Afroamerican and African Studies - Barbara Christian, "Trajectories of
the Self-Placing Contemporary Afro-American Women's Fiction," 7:30
p.m., Rackham.
IEEE - Art Burks, "The Chemstry of Ideas," noon, Rm. 1402 East
Engineering.
Latino Studies Program - Counsuelo Nieto, "Cultural Identity: Interac-
tion of Culture & Sex Roles,"7 p.m., Henderson Rm., League.
Japanese Studies - John Voorhorst, "The Japanese Disaster: A study of
Collective Behavior in High Stress Environments," noon, Lane Hall Com-
mons Room.
Meetings
University AA - noon, Rm. 3200 Union.
Anxiety Disorders Support Group - 7:30 p.m., 3rd Floor Conference
Room, Children's Psychiatry Hospital.
Baptist Student Union -7 p.m., Rm D, League.
Agape Christian Fellowship - 6:30 p.m., South Quad Minority Lounge.
Intervarsity Christian Fellowship -7 p.m., Union.
CEW - noon, League.
International Center - "Surviving & Thriving in Europe," 3:30 p.m., 600
E. Madison.
Eating Disorders Support Group -7 p.m., First United Methodist Church.
Miscellaneous
Scottish Country Dancers - Beginners, 7 p.m., intermediates, 8 p.m.,
Forest Hills Community Center, 2351 Shadowood Dr.
International night, Mexico, 5 p.m., League Cafeteria.
Civil Engineering - seminar, Niels Lend, "Perceptions of Risk & Accep-
table Risk," 4 p.m., Rm. 1013 Dow Building.
Women's Studies Program - Hamilton/McGuigan Awards, Jessie Ber-
nard, "Whither Marriage?" 4 p.m., Rackham.
Physiology - Vision lunch seminar, Janice Ackerman, "Dopamine &
Dopamine Receptors in the Retina," 12:15 p.m., Rm. 2005 Mental Health
Research Institute.
English Dept. - Colloquim, James White, "Law as Rhetoric; Rhetoric as
Law: The Arts of Cultural and Communal Life,"8 p.m., Rackham.
English Language and Literature - Reading, Barry Wallenstein, 4 p.m.,
Rackham.
Warner-Lambert & Parke-Davis - seminar, Hollis Wallenstein, "An-
thrapyrazoles: Design,, Synthesis, and Biological Activity of a Novel
Class of Broad-Spectrum Anti-Cancer Agents," 4 p.m., Rm. 3554 C.C. Lit--
tle Building.
Tau Beta Pi - Tutoring, lower level math, science, and engineering, 7
p.m., 307 UGLi, 8 p.m., Rm. 2332 Bursley, 7 p.m., Alice Lloyd.
Statistics - seminar, Davig Siegmund, "A Survey of Change-Point
Problems," 4 p.m., Rm. 451 Mason Hall.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Audit may
force med.,
loans into
banikruptcy
(Continued from Page 1)
Medical and dental students can
borrow up to $20,000 a year for four
years at market rates, with the gover-
nment guaranteeing to the lender that it
will pay if the student defaults.
THE PROGRAM now insures about
$500 million in outstanding loans, the
audit said. But the loans are quickly
becoming more popular, the audit said,
and may total $3 billion by the early
1990s.,
The program could have gone
bankrupt this year and left the gover-
nment with a $100 million debt over the
next five years if the Public Health
Service had not raised the insurance
premium on the loans during the audit,
he said.
That premium had been set to cover a
default rate of 2 percent, he said, while
the actual default rate was 8 percent
and default rates of 10 to 15 percent are
expected.
But the insurance premium now is at
the ceiling set by Congress, Kusserow
said, and cannot be raised unless the
law is changed. Unless that and other
reforms are enacted, he said, the
program still faces bankruptcy.

(Continued from Page 1)
Nissen. But often students make a good
case for being readmitted, he says.
LSA REINSTATES "about 50 per-
cent" of the people it has dismissed,
Nissen says. "We look for some in-
dication that the problem before is
resolved."
According to Elaine Harden, an
assistant to engineering Dean
Quackenbush, approximately one-third
of dismissed engineering students who
petition for readmittance are readmit-
ted into the school. She believes that,
"If they've fallen behind to the point of
enrollment withheld, odds are high"
that they won't be able to pull them-
selves out. She says that many students
like to start anew at another school.
LSA's Crafton says that the
petitioning forms are "tailor made to
an individual person's problems." For
her, seeing students get back into the
University is something she says she
enjoys, "otherwise this would be a
depressing job."
CRAFTON cited the case of one
woman who had been pre-med before
she was dismissed from LSA. After
taking a semester off to work in a
hospital, this woman found she liked
children and not medicine. She was
reinstated as a psychology major and
was very successful, Crafton says.
Though many students may simply
pick a major that is not catered to their
interests, others have some unusual
explanations for doing poorly in their
classes.
LSA freshman Kyle Nemit, who went
on probation last fall, says he felt com-
pelled to attend University basketball
games.
"YOU'VE GOT to go to the games,"
says Nemit vehemently, adding that
basketball games took priority over
school the semester he went on
probation. "Work isn't harder (than
high school) at all. (But) you have to
put in a lot more time than I thought."
Though "work comes first now" for
Nemit, he says early classes also posed
a problem for him. "I couldn't get up
for only 9 o'clock classes," he says. He
has since combatted his morning
lethargy and advises others facing
similar circumstances to simply "work
hard."
Most students interviewed felt that

the probation discipline process was a
fair one that gives students plenty of
warning. As Nissen notes, "Most
students are disappointed with them-
selves" and not the University.
LSA FRESHMAN Barry Echtman
agrees that he deserved a 1.8 G.P.A.
because he "just blew off" his classes.
He also says he understands that doing
well is really up to the individual. But
he also says the counseling he received
did little to help him straighten up.
"I bull-shitted with him (the coun-
selor)," Echtman says. "It's really up
to yourself."
But Charles Judge, head counselor
for LSA, says that the amount of impact
the counselor has on the student simply
depends on the situation in which the
student finds himself. From experien-
ce, Judge says the most receptive
students are those without a declared
major.
JUDGE ADDS that he feels a "2.0 is
not too much to ask of a student." The
average LSA freshman receives a 3.02,
he says.
Engineering student Matecun says
that he believes the University "could do
a lot more" with probation than they
'currently do. He says he thinks they
should "add more shock value.k h
One student,who asked that his name
be withheld, says that dismissal is not a
real solution to the problems of students
receiving poor grades.

ANOTHER student who wished to
remain anonymous was surprised at
the ease of improving her grades once
she had been put on probation. She says
that if members of the University ad-
ministration expressed more concern
about students' poor performance in
class, it would have a more positive im-
pact on the student.
Matecun and Engineering Dean
Quackenbush, however, see that the
major factor in the academic success of
a student is an effective use of time.
"If you can force yourself to spend
time at the library, anyone can get a
2.7," says Matecun. "Time
management is the most important
thing."
Says Quackenbush: "The truly good
students manage their time ... and fit
into this large system."
RESEARCH
Send $2 for catalog
of over 16,000 topics to
assistgyour research ef-
forts. For info., call toll-
free 1-800621-5745 (inIl
lnois call 312-922
i-, Authors' Research, Rm. 600"N,
i 407 S. Dearborn. Chicago. fl 60605
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