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March 26, 1985 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

No lights

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 26, 1985-- Page 11
l 'i

Judge pulls plug on 'night lights'

CHICAGO (AP) - There will be joy
in Wrigleyville, the mighty Cubs have
struck out.
' "Yes, you're out. O-U-T. The Cubs
.are out," Circuit Judge Richard Curry
said Monday in upholding state and city
laws that effectively ban night baseball
at Wrigley Field, America's only
major-league ballpark without lights.
CURRY'S RULING came in response
to a suit filed by the Cubs in December
seeking to have those laws declared un
constitutional.
The judge's ruling interspersed lyrics
'rom the song "Take Me Out To The
Ballgame" and concluded on a light
yhearted note: "Justice is a southpaw
and the Cubs just don't hit lefties!"
But it looks like this cutest will go in
to extra innings: The Cubs' attorney:
filed a notice of appeal with the Illinoi:
Appellate Court.
GENERAL MANAGER Dallas Greer
said in Mesa, Ariz., where the Cubs are
in spring training, that he was "very
very disappointed" with the ruling.
While he made no reference t<
_ rumors that the Cubs would move fron
Wrigley Field if they couldn't get lights
he said, "We consider this very, very
serious business."
"It means peace and tranquility" foi
the community, said Alderman Ber
nard Hansen, whose ward includes par
of the area around the 71-year-olh
ballpark.
MANY RESIDENTS argued nigh
= pgames would exacerbate existing
troubles like litter, noise, traffic and a
shortage of parking spaces.
"No one can seriously suggest... tha
the influx of 37,000 visitors into
residential community at night is no
quantitively different than those same
numbers during the. daylight hours,'
Arizona St.
5coach may
qit over
players
drug use

Curry said in a 64-page ruling.
The judge said the Cubs offered no
'correlation between daytime
television and nighttime television
revenue potential."
A LETTER FROM Peter Ueberroth,
baseball commissioner, to the Cubs last
December figured prominently in the
lawsuit.
In that . letter, Ueberroth said
baseball would take "drastic action"

unless the team resolved the problem of
night baseball at Wrigley Field.
Ueberroth's letter did not specify
lights as the only solution, but noted
television revenue lost because night
games cannot be played at Wrigley
could result in the Cubs' future home
playoff dates being shifted elsewhere.
The state law subjects stadiums to
strict noise pollution standards 'that are
monitored by the Illinois Pollution Con-

at Wrigley
trol Board. Chicago's two other large
stadiums are exempt because both held
night contests before the law was
passed.
The city ordinance prohibits
professional sporting contests between
the hours of 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. in open
stadiums containing more than 15,000
seats that are located within 500 feet of
100 or more dwellings.

Learn German
This Summer

f

t Associated Press
e Steve Wingis looks to the sun in Chicago after a circuit judge decided that it will be the only light that the Cubs will play
under. The judge's decision upholds state and city laws effectively banning night games at Wrigley Field.

June 24 -
August 2, 1985
The Fifth Annual German Summer School
of the Atlantic at the University of Rhode island
in co-operation with the Goethe Institute Boston.
German will be the sole language of communication, and German
life and culture the heart of this six week residency program of
intensive language study.
You may earn up to nine undergraduate or graduate credits while
living in the beautiful surroundings of our country campus, just
minutes away from Rhode Island's magnificent beaches and his-
toric summer colonies.
This program is ideally suited for anyone wishing to learn or
improve his or her German - from business people and travelers,
to students planning work or study abroad. Take advantage of this
rare opportunity to participate in this total German Language
experience.

TEMPE, Ariz. (AP)-Arizona State
University baseball coach Jim
Brock, who sidelined himself in distress
over his role in player use of a poten-
tially dangerous mood-altering drug,
says he'll decide by today whether to
T give up his job.
Brock, who has been head coach at
Arizona State since 1972, chose to watch
from the stands Sunday as Arizona
State beat Southern California.
HE BLAMED anxiety that was
caused by recent articles about the use
of Nardil by some of his players.
"I felt that in the emotional state I
was in, that I would have been a
detriment to the ballclub," Brock said.
"I wouldn't play a players who was so
upset-that he couldn'tperform well and
I didn't think a coach should coach un-

der those circumstances."
Reports published last week said Dr.
James Gough prescribed the drug, a
hydrazine derivative manufactured by
Parke-Davis Co., for two Arizona State
baseball players and suggested it to six
others.
BROCK, WHO said that until two
years ago he had used the drug under
prescription while being counseled by
Gough for depression, also has said it
has been used in other Arizona State
althletic programs.
Dr. Robert Voy, chief medical officer
of the U.S. Olympic Committee,
described Nardil as a "very, very
dangerous drug" to be used in cases of

depression only when every other drug
has been tried
Gough, who said he prescribed Nardil
for players to help them feel better
about themselves and thus improve
performance, said earlier he considers
it to be safe. He also said that in
prescribing it, he warns about potential
side effects that can occur in com-
bination with consumption of certain
food or over the counter medications.
Parke-Davis and some physicians
have been quoted saying that the drug
generally is given as a last resort to
people suffering severe neurotic
depression.

For details:
D

Dr. John Grandin
Dr. Otto Dornberg, Co-Directors
Department of Languages
University of Rhode Island
Kingston, RI 02881 (401) 792-5911

Concentrate.
8=1.
A Summer's worth of concentrated study
could earn you a year's worth of
Northwestern University credit in one of
these science or language courses...
... Calculus, chemistry, physics, Arabic,
Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian,
Japanese, Latin, Russian or Spanish.
To learn more about this unique, eight-week,
Intensive Study program or about all that
SummerSession has to offer, ask for our
Course Bulletin.
Call Toll Free, during normal business hours.
1-800-562-5200, Ext. 300
6-week session, June 24-August 3
8-week session, June 24-August 17
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
SummerSession, 1985
2003 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60201
(312) 491-5250
Academic Excellence in a Most Favorable Climate
a-
1 O1
Northwestern
NZOOIS725

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